REGENHU-Switzerland-3d-bioprinting-instrument-bio-3d-bioprinter-DevelopmentTeam-0006

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You are researching: Zurich University of Applied Sciences (ZHAW)
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AUTHOR Alave Reyes-Furrer, Angela and De Andrade, Sonia and Bachmann, Dominic and Jeker, Heidi and Steinmann, Martin and Accart, Nathalie and Dunbar, Andrew and Rausch, Martin and Bono, Epifania and Rimann, Markus and Keller, Hansjoerg
Title Matrigel 3D bioprinting of contractile human skeletal muscle models recapitulating exercise and pharmacological responses [Abstract]
Year 2021
Journal/Proceedings Communications Biology
Reftype Alave Reyes-Furrer2021
DOI/URL DOI
Abstract
A key to enhance the low translatability of preclinical drug discovery are in vitro human three-dimensional (3D) microphysiological systems (MPS). Here, we show a new method for automated engineering of 3D human skeletal muscle models in microplates and functional compound screening to address the lack of muscle wasting disease medication. To this end, we adapted our recently described 24-well plate 3D bioprinting platform with a printhead cooling system to allow microvalve-based drop-on-demand printing of cell-laden Matrigel containing primary human muscle precursor cells. Mini skeletal muscle models develop within a week exhibiting contractile, striated myofibers aligned between two attachment posts. As an in vitro exercise model, repeated high impact stimulation of contractions for 3 h by a custom-made electrical pulse stimulation (EPS) system for 24-well plates induced interleukin-6 myokine expression and Akt hypertrophy pathway activation. Furthermore, the known muscle stimulators caffeine and Tirasemtiv acutely increase EPS-induced contractile force of the models. This validated new human muscle MPS will benefit development of drugs against muscle wasting diseases. Moreover, our Matrigel 3D bioprinting platform will allow engineering of non-self-organizing complex human 3D MPS.
AUTHOR Laternser, Sandra and Keller, Hansjoerg and Leupin, Olivier and Rausch, Martin and Graf-Hausner, Ursula and Rimann, Markus
Title A Novel Microplate 3D Bioprinting Platform for the Engineering of Muscle and Tendon Tissues [Abstract]
Year 2018
Journal/Proceedings SLAS TECHNOLOGY: Translating Life Sciences Innovation
Reftype
DOI/URL DOI
Abstract
Two-dimensional (2D) cell cultures do not reflect the in vivo situation, and thus it is important to develop predictive three-dimensional (3D) in vitro models with enhanced reliability and robustness for drug screening applications. Treatments against muscle-related diseases are becoming more prominent due to the growth of the aging population worldwide. In this study, we describe a novel drug screening platform with automated production of 3D musculoskeletal-tendon-like tissues. With 3D bioprinting, alternating layers of photo-polymerized gelatin-methacryloyl-based bioink and cell suspension tissue models were produced in a dumbbell shape onto novel postholder cell culture inserts in 24-well plates. Monocultures of human primary skeletal muscle cells and rat tenocytes were printed around and between the posts. The cells showed high viability in culture and good tissue differentiation, based on marker gene and protein expressions. Different printing patterns of bioink and cells were explored and calcium signaling with Fluo4-loaded cells while electrically stimulated was shown. Finally, controlled co-printing of tenocytes and myoblasts around and between the posts, respectively, was demonstrated followed by co-culture and co-differentiation. This screening platform combining 3D bioprinting with a novel microplate represents a promising tool to address musculoskeletal diseases.
AUTHOR Raghunath, Michael and Rimann, Markus and Kopanska, Katarzyna and Laternser, Sandra
Title TEDD Annual Meeting with 3D Bioprinting Workshop [Abstract]
Year 2018
Journal/Proceedings CHIMIA
Reftype
DOI/URL DOI
Abstract
Bioprinting is the technology of choice for realizing functional tissues such as vascular system, muscle, cartilage and bone. In the future, bioprinting will influence the way we engineer tissues and bring it to a new level of physiological relevance. That was the topic of the 2017 TEDD Annual Meeting at ZHAW Waedenswil on 8th and 9th November. In an exciting workshop, the two companies regenHU Ltd. and CELLINK gave us an insight into highly topical applications and collaborations in this domain.
AUTHOR Rimann, Markus and Laternser, Sandra and Keller, Hansj{"{o}}rg and Leupin, Olivier and Graf-Hausner, Ursula
Title 3D Bioprinted Muscle and Tendon Tissues for Drug Development
Year 2015
Journal/Proceedings {CHIMIA} International Journal for Chemistry
Reftype
DOI/URL DOI
AUTHOR Rimann, Markus and Bono, Epifania and Annaheim, Helene and Bleisch, Matthias and Graf-Hausner, Ursula
Title Standardized 3D Bioprinting of Soft Tissue Models with Human Primary Cells. [Abstract]
Year 2015
Journal/Proceedings Journal of laboratory automation
Reftype
DOI/URL DOI
Abstract
Cells grown in 3D are more physiologically relevant than cells cultured in 2D. To use 3D models in substance testing and regenerative medicine, reproducibility and standardization are important. Bioprinting offers not only automated standardizable processes but also the production of complex tissue-like structures in an additive manner. We developed an all-in-one bioprinting solution to produce soft tissue models. The holistic approach included (1) a bioprinter in a sterile environment, (2) a light-induced bioink polymerization unit, (3) a user-friendly software, (4) the capability to print in standard labware for high-throughput screening, (5) cell-compatible inkjet-based printheads, (6) a cell-compatible ready-to-use BioInk, and (7) standard operating procedures. In a proof-of-concept study, skin as a reference soft tissue model was printed. To produce dermal equivalents, primary human dermal fibroblasts were printed in alternating layers with BioInk and cultured for up to 7 weeks. During long-term cultures, the models were remodeled and fully populated with viable and spreaded fibroblasts. Primary human dermal keratinocytes were seeded on top of dermal equivalents, and epidermis-like structures were formed as verified with hematoxylin and eosin staining and immunostaining. However, a fully stratified epidermis was not achieved. Nevertheless, this is one of the first reports of an integrative bioprinting strategy for industrial routine application.