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AUTHOR Nothdurfter, Daniel and Ploner, Christian and Coraça-Huber, Débora C. and Wilflingseder, Doris and Müller, Thomas and Hermann, Martin and Hagenbuchner, Judith and Ausserlechner, Michael J.
Title 3D bioprinted, vascularized neuroblastoma tumor environment in fluidic chip devices for precision medicine drug testing [Abstract]
Year 2022
Journal/Proceedings Biofabrication
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Neuroblastoma is an extracranial solid tumor which develops in early childhood and still has a poor prognosis. One strategy to increase cure rates is the identification of patient-specific drug responses in tissue models that mimic the interaction between patient cancer cells and tumor environment. We therefore developed a perfused and micro-vascularized tumor-environment model that is directly bioprinted into custom-manufactured fluidic chips. A gelatin-methacrylate/fibrin-based matrix containing multiple cell types mimics the tumor-microenvironment that promotes spontaneous micro-vessel formation by embedded endothelial cells. We demonstrate that both, adipocyte- and iPSC-derived mesenchymal stem cells can guide this process. Bioprinted channels are coated with endothelial cells post printing to form a dense vessel - tissue barrier. The tissue model thereby mimics structure and function of human soft tissue with endothelial cell-coated larger vessels for perfusion and micro-vessel networks within the hydrogel-matrix. Patient-derived neuroblastoma spheroids are added to the matrix during the printing process and grown for more than two weeks. We demonstrate that micro-vessels are attracted by and grow into tumor spheroids and that neuroblastoma cells invade the tumor-environment as soon as the spheroids disrupt. In summary, we describe the first bioprinted, micro-vascularized neuroblastoma – tumor-environment model directly printed into fluidic chips and a novel medium-throughput biofabrication platform suitable for studying tumor angiogenesis and metastasis in precision medicine approaches in future.
AUTHOR Habelt, Bettina and Wirth, Christopher and Afanasenkau, Dzmitry and Mihaylova, Lyudmila and Winter, Christine and Arvaneh, Mahnaz and Minev, Ivan R. and Bernhardt, Nadine
Title A Multimodal Neuroprosthetic Interface to Record, Modulate and Classify Electrophysiological Biomarkers Relevant to Neuropsychiatric Disorders [Abstract]
Year 2021
Journal/Proceedings Frontiers in Bioengineering and Biotechnology
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Most mental disorders, such as addictive diseases or schizophrenia, are characterized by impaired cognitive function and behavior control originating from disturbances within prefrontal neural networks. Their often chronic reoccurring nature and the lack of efficient therapies necessitate the development of new treatment strategies. Brain-computer interfaces, equipped with multiple sensing and stimulation abilities, offer a new toolbox whose suitability for diagnosis and therapy of mental disorders has not yet been explored. This study, therefore, aimed to develop a biocompatible and multimodal neuroprosthesis to measure and modulate prefrontal neurophysiological features of neuropsychiatric symptoms. We used a 3D-printing technology to rapidly prototype customized bioelectronic implants through robot-controlled deposition of soft silicones and a conductive platinum ink. We implanted the device epidurally above the medial prefrontal cortex of rats and obtained auditory event-related brain potentials in treatment-naïve animals, after alcohol administration and following neuromodulation through implant-driven electrical brain stimulation and cortical delivery of the anti-relapse medication naltrexone. Towards smart neuroprosthetic interfaces, we furthermore developed machine learning algorithms to autonomously classify treatment effects within the neural recordings. The neuroprosthesis successfully captured neural activity patterns reflecting intact stimulus processing and alcohol-induced neural depression. Moreover, implant-driven electrical and pharmacological stimulation enabled successful enhancement of neural activity. A machine learning approach based on stepwise linear discriminant analysis was able to deal with sparsity in the data and distinguished treatments with high accuracy. Our work demonstrates the feasibility of multimodal bioelectronic systems to monitor, modulate and identify healthy and affected brain states with potential use in a personalized and optimized therapy of neuropsychiatric disorders.
AUTHOR Bouwmeester, Manon C. and Bernal, Paulina N. and Oosterhoff, Loes A. and van Wolferen, Monique E. and Lehmann, Vivian and Vermaas, Monique and Buchholz, Maj-Britt and Peiffer, Quentin C. and Malda, Jos and van der Laan, Luc J. W. and Kramer, Nynke I. and Schneeberger, Kerstin and Levato, Riccardo and Spee, Bart
Title Bioprinting of Human Liver-Derived Epithelial Organoids for Toxicity Studies [Abstract]
Year 2021
Journal/Proceedings Macromolecular Bioscience
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Abstract There is a need for long-lived hepatic in vitro models to better predict drug induced liver injury (DILI). Human liver-derived epithelial organoids are a promising cell source for advanced in vitro models. Here, organoid technology is combined with biofabrication techniques, which holds great potential for the design of in vitro models with complex and customizable architectures. Here, porous constructs with human hepatocyte-like cells derived from organoids are generated using extrusion-based printing technology. Cell viability of bioprinted organoids remains stable for up to ten days (88–107% cell viability compared to the day of printing). The expression of hepatic markers, transporters, and phase I enzymes increased compared to undifferentiated controls, and is comparable to non-printed controls. Exposure to acetaminophen, a well-known hepatotoxic compound, decreases cell viability of bioprinted liver organoids to 21–51% (p < 0.05) compared to the start of exposure, and elevated levels of damage marker miR-122 are observed in the culture medium, indicating the potential use of the bioprinted constructs for toxicity testing. In conclusion, human liver-derived epithelial organoids can be combined with a biofabrication approach, thereby paving the way to create perfusable, complex constructs which can be used as toxicology- and disease-models.
AUTHOR Ng, Wei Long and Ayi, Teck Choon and Liu, Yi-Chun and Sing, Swee Leong and Yeong, Wai Yee and Tan, Boon-Huan
Title Fabrication and Characterization of 3D Bioprinted Triple-layered Human Alveolar Lung Models [Abstract]
Year 2021
Journal/Proceedings International journal of bioprinting
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The global prevalence of respiratory diseases caused by infectious pathogens has resulted in an increased demand for realistic in-vitro alveolar lung models to serve as suitable disease models. This demand has resulted in the fabrication of numerous two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) in-vitro alveolar lung models. The ability to fabricate these 3D in-vitro alveolar lung models in an automated manner with high repeatability and reliability is important for potential scalable production. In this study, we reported the fabrication of human triple-layered alveolar lung models comprising of human lung epithelial cells, human endothelial cells, and human lung fibroblasts using the drop-on-demand (DOD) 3D bioprinting technique. The polyvinylpyrrolidone-based bio-inks and the use of a 300 mm nozzle diameter improved the repeatability of the bioprinting process by achieving consistent cell output over time using different human alveolar lung cells. The 3D bioprinted human triple-layered alveolar lung models were able to maintain cell viability with relative similar proliferation profile over time as compared to non-printed cells. This DOD 3D bioprinting platform offers an attractive tool for highly repeatable and scalable fabrication of 3D in-vitro human alveolar lung models.
AUTHOR He, Shaolong and Radeke, Carmen and Jacobsen, Jette and Lind, Johan Ulrik and Mu, Huiling
Title Multi-material 3D printing of programmable and stretchable oromucosal patches for delivery of saquinavir [Abstract]
Year 2021
Journal/Proceedings International Journal of Pharmaceutics
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Oromucosal patches for drug delivery allow fast onset of action and ability to circumvent hepatic first pass metabolism of drugs. While conventional fabrication methods such as solvent casting or hot melt extrusion are ideal for scalable production of low-cost delivery patches, these methods chiefly allow for simple, homogenous patch designs. As alternative, a multi-material direct-ink-write 3D printing for rapid fabrication of complex oromucosal patches with unique design features was demonstrated in the present study. Specifically, three print-materials: an acidic saquinavir-loaded hydroxypropyl methylcellulose ink, an alkaline effervescent sodium carbonate-loaded ink, and a methyl cellulose backing material were combined in various designs. The CO2 content and pH of the microenvironment were controlled by adjusting the number of alkaline layers in the patch. Additionally, the rigid and brittle patches were converted to compliant and stretchable patches by implementing mesh-like designs. Our results illustrate how 3D printing can be used for rapid design and fabrication of multifunctional or customized oromucosal patches with tailored dosages and changed drug permeation.
AUTHOR Asulin, Masha and Michael, Idan and Shapira, Assaf and Dvir, Tal
Title One-Step 3D Printing of Heart Patches with Built-In Electronics for Performance Regulation [Abstract]
Year 2021
Journal/Proceedings Advanced Science
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Abstract Three dimensional (3D) printing of heart patches usually provides the ability to precisely control cell location in 3D space. Here, one-step 3D printing of cardiac patches with built-in soft and stretchable electronics is reported. The tissue is simultaneously printed using three distinct bioinks for the cells, for the conducting parts of the electronics and for the dielectric components. It is shown that the hybrid system can withstand continuous physical deformations as those taking place in the contracting myocardium. The electronic patch is flexible, stretchable, and soft, and the electrodes within the printed patch are able to monitor the function of the engineered tissue by providing extracellular potentials. Furthermore, the system allowed controlling tissue function by providing electrical stimulation for pacing. It is envisioned that such transplantable patches may regain heart contractility and allow the physician to monitor the implant function as well as to efficiently intervene from afar when needed.
AUTHOR Kajtez, Janko and Buchmann, Sebastian and Vasudevan, Shashank and Birtele, Marcella and Rocchetti, Stefano and Pless, Christian Jonathan and Heiskanen, Arto and Barker, Roger A. and Martínez-Serrano, Alberto and Parmar, Malin and Lind, Johan Ulrik and Emnéus, Jenny
Title 3D-Printed Soft Lithography for Complex Compartmentalized Microfluidic Neural Devices [Abstract]
Year 2020
Journal/Proceedings Advanced Science
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Abstract Compartmentalized microfluidic platforms are an invaluable tool in neuroscience research. However, harnessing the full potential of this technology remains hindered by the lack of a simple fabrication approach for the creation of intricate device architectures with high-aspect ratio features. Here, a hybrid additive manufacturing approach is presented for the fabrication of open-well compartmentalized neural devices that provides larger freedom of device design, removes the need for manual postprocessing, and allows an increase in the biocompatibility of the system. Suitability of the method for multimaterial integration allows to tailor the device architecture for the long-term maintenance of healthy human stem-cell derived neurons and astrocytes, spanning at least 40 days. Leveraging fast-prototyping capabilities at both micro and macroscale, a proof-of-principle human in vitro model of the nigrostriatal pathway is created. By presenting a route for novel materials and unique architectures in microfluidic systems, the method provides new possibilities in biological research beyond neuroscience applications.
AUTHOR Afanasenkau, Dzmitry and Kalinina, Daria and Lyakhovetskii, Vsevolod and Tondera, Christoph and Gorsky, Oleg and Moosavi, Seyyed and Pavlova, Natalia and Merkulyeva, Natalia and Kalueff, Allan V. and Minev, Ivan R. and Musienko, Pavel
Title Rapid prototyping of soft bioelectronic implants for use as neuromuscular interfaces [Abstract]
Year 2020
Journal/Proceedings Nature Biomedical Engineering
Reftype Afanasenkau2020
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Abstract
Neuromuscular interfaces are required to translate bioelectronic technologies for application in clinical medicine. Here, by leveraging the robotically controlled ink-jet deposition of low-viscosity conductive inks, extrusion of insulating silicone pastes and in situ activation of electrode surfaces via cold-air plasma, we show that soft biocompatible materials can be rapidly printed for the on-demand prototyping of customized electrode arrays well adjusted to specific anatomical environments, functions and experimental models. We also show, with the monitoring and activation of neuronal pathways in the brain, spinal cord and neuromuscular system of cats, rats and zebrafish, that the printed bioelectronic interfaces allow for long-term integration and functional stability. This technology might enable personalized bioelectronics for neuroprosthetic applications.
AUTHOR Kleger, Nicole and Cihova, Martina and Masania, Kunal and Studart, André R. and Löffler, Jörg F.
Title 3d printing of salt as a template for magnesium with structured porosity [Abstract]
Year 2019
Journal/Proceedings advanced materials
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Abstract Porosity is an essential feature in a wide range of applications that combine light weight with high surface area and tunable density. Porous materials can be easily prepared with a vast variety of chemistries using the salt-leaching technique. However, this templating approach has so far been limited to the fabrication of structures with random porosity and relatively simple macroscopic shapes. Here, a technique is reported that combines the ease of salt leaching with the complex shaping possibilities given by additive manufacturing (AM). By tuning the composition of surfactant and solvent, the salt-based paste is rheologically engineered and printed via direct ink writing into grid-like structures displaying structured pores that span from the sub-millimeter to the macroscopic scale. As a proof of concept, dried and sintered NaCl templates are infiltrated with magnesium (Mg), which is typically highly challenging to process by conventional AM techniques due to its highly oxidative nature and high vapor pressure. Mg scaffolds with well-controlled, ordered porosity are obtained after salt removal. The tunable mechanical properties and the potential to be predictably bioresorbed by the human body make these Mg scaffolds attractive for biomedical implants and demonstrate the great potential of this additive technique.
AUTHOR Daly, Andrew C. and Kelly, Daniel J.
Title Biofabrication of spatially organised tissues by directing the growth of cellular spheroids within 3D printed polymeric microchambers [Abstract]
Year 2019
Journal/Proceedings Biomaterials
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Successful tissue engineering requires the generation of human scale implants that mimic the structure, composition and mechanical properties of native tissues. Here, we report a novel biofabrication strategy that enables the engineering of structurally organised tissues by guiding the growth of cellular spheroids within arrays of 3D printed polymeric microchambers. With the goal of engineering stratified articular cartilage, inkjet bioprinting was used to deposit defined numbers of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) and chondrocytes into pre-printed microchambers. These jetted cell suspensions rapidly underwent condensation within the hydrophobic microchambers, leading to the formation of organised arrays of cellular spheroids. The microchambers were also designed to provide boundary conditions to these spheroids, guiding their growth and eventual fusion, leading to the development of stratified cartilage tissue with a depth-dependant collagen fiber architecture that mimicked the structure of native articular cartilage. Furthermore, the composition and biomechanical properties of the bioprinted cartilage was also comparable to the native tissue. Using multi-tool biofabrication, we were also able to engineer anatomically accurate, human scale, osteochondral templates by printing this microchamber system on top of a hypertrophic cartilage region designed to support endochondral bone formation and then maintaining the entire construct in long-term bioreactor culture to enhance tissue development. This bioprinting strategy provides a versatile and scalable approach to engineer structurally organised cartilage tissues for joint resurfacing applications.
AUTHOR Khaled, Shaban A. and Alexander, Morgan R. and Irvine, Derek J. and Wildman, Ricky D. and Wallace, Martin J. and Sharpe, Sonja and Yoo, Jae and Roberts, Clive J.
Title Extrusion 3D Printing of Paracetamol Tablets from a Single Formulation with Tunable Release Profiles Through Control of Tablet Geometry [Abstract]
Year 2018
Journal/Proceedings AAPS PharmSciTech
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An extrusion-based 3D printer was used to fabricate paracetamol tablets with different geometries (mesh, ring and solid) from a single paste-based formulation formed from standard pharmaceutical ingredients. The tablets demonstrate that tunable drug release profiles can be achieved from this single formulation even with high drug loading (>{thinspace}80{%} w/w). The tablets were evaluated for drug release using a USP dissolution testing type I apparatus. The tablets showed well-defined release profiles (from immediate to sustained release) controlled by their different geometries. The dissolution results showed dependency of drug release on the surface area/volume (SA/V) ratio and the SA of the different tablets. The tablets with larger SA/V ratios and SA had faster drug release. The 3D printed tablets were also evaluated for physical and mechanical properties including tablet dimension, drug content, weight variation and breaking force and were within acceptable range as defined by the international standards stated in the US Pharmacopoeia. X-ray powder diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry and attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were used to identify the physical form of the active and to assess possible drug-excipient interactions. These data again showed that the tablets meet USP requirement. These results clearly demonstrate the potential of 3D printing to create unique pharmaceutical manufacturing, and potentially clinical, opportunities. The ability to use a single unmodified formulation to achieve defined release profiles could allow, for example, relatively straightforward personalization of medicines for individuals with different metabolism rates for certain drugs and hence could offer significant development and clinical opportunities.
AUTHOR Khaled, Shaban A. and Burley, Jonathan C. and Alexander, Morgan R. and Yang, Jing and Roberts, Clive J.
Title 3D printing of five-in-one dose combination polypill with defined immediate and sustained release profiles [Abstract]
Year 2015
Journal/Proceedings Journal of Controlled Release
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Abstract We have used three dimensional (3D) extrusion printing to manufacture a multi-active solid dosage form or so called polypill. This contains five compartmentalised drugs with two independently controlled and well-defined release profiles. This polypill demonstrates that complex medication regimes can be combined in a single personalised tablet. This could potentially improve adherence for those patients currently taking many separate tablets and also allow ready tailoring of a particular drug combination/drug release for the needs of an individual. The polypill here represents a cardiovascular treatment regime with the incorporation of an immediate release compartment with aspirin and hydrochlorothiazide and three sustained release compartments containing pravastatin, atenolol, and ramipril. X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) and Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) were used to assess drug-excipient interaction. The printed polypills were evaluated for drug release using {USP} dissolution testing. We found that the polypill showed the intended immediate and sustained release profiles based upon the active/excipient ratio used.
AUTHOR Zhang, Danwei and Jonhson, Win and Herng, Tun Seng and Ang, Yong Quan and Yang, Lin and Tan, Swee Ching and Peng, Erwin and He, Hui and Ding, Jun
Title A 3D-printing method of fabrication for metals{,} ceramics{,} and multi-materials using a universal self-curable technique for robocasting [Abstract]
Year 2019
Journal/Proceedings Materials Horizons
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Ceramics and metals are important materials that modern technologies are constructed from. The capability to produce such materials in a complex geometry with good mechanical properties can revolutionize the way we engineer our devices. Current curing techniques pose challenges such as high energy requirements{,} limitations of materials with high refractive index{,} tedious post-processing heat treatment processes{,} uneven drying shrinkages{,} and brittleness of green bodies. In this paper{,} a novel modified self-curable epoxide–amine 3D printing system is proposed to print a wide range of ceramics (metal oxides{,} nitrides{,} and carbides) and metals without the need for an external curing source. Through this technique{,} complex multi-material structures (with metal–ceramic and ceramic–ceramic combinations) can also be realized. Tailoring and matching the sintering temperatures of different materials through sintering additives and dopants{,} combined with a structural design providing maximum adhesion between interfaces{,} allow us to successfully obtain superior quality sintered multi-material structures. High-quality ceramic and metallic materials have been achieved (e.g.{,} zirconia with >98% theoretical density). Also{,} highly conductive metals and magnetic ceramics were printed and shaped uniquely without the need for a sacrificial support. With the addition of low molecular weight plasticizers and a multi-stage heat treatment process{,} crack-free and dense high-quality integrated multi-material structures fabricated by 3D printing can thus be a reality in the near future.
AUTHOR Khaled, Shaban A. and Alexander, Morgan R. and Wildman, Ricky D. and Wallace, Martin J. and Sharpe, Sonja and Yoo, Jae and Roberts, Clive J.
Title 3D extrusion printing of high drug loading immediate release paracetamol tablets [Abstract]
Year 2018
Journal/Proceedings International Journal of Pharmaceutics
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The manufacture of immediate release high drug loading paracetamol oral tablets was achieved using an extrusion based 3D printer from a premixed water based paste formulation. The 3D printed tablets demonstrate that a very high drug (paracetamol) loading formulation (80% w/w) can be printed as an acceptable tablet using a method suitable for personalisation and distributed manufacture. Paracetamol is an example of a drug whose physical form can present challenges to traditional powder compression tableting. Printing avoids these issues and facilitates the relatively high drug loading. The 3D printed tablets were evaluated for physical and mechanical properties including weight variation, friability, breaking force, disintegration time, and dimensions and were within acceptable range as defined by the international standards stated in the United States Pharmacopoeia (USP). X-ray Powder Diffraction (XRPD) was used to identify the physical form of the active. Additionally, XRPD, Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) were used to assess possible drug-excipient interactions. The 3D printed tablets were evaluated for drug release using a USP dissolution testing type I apparatus. The tablets showed a profile characteristic of the immediate release profile as intended based upon the active/excipient ratio used with disintegration in less than 60 s and release of most of the drug within 5 min. The results demonstrate the capability of 3D extrusion based printing to produce acceptable high-drug loading tablets from approved materials that comply with current USP standards.
AUTHOR Daly, Andrew C. and Pitacco, Pierluca and Nulty, Jessica and Cunniffe, Gráinne M. and Kelly, Daniel J.
Title 3D printed microchannel networks to direct vascularisation during endochondral bone repair [Abstract]
Year 2018
Journal/Proceedings Biomaterials
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Bone tissue engineering strategies that recapitulate the developmental process of endochondral ossification offer a promising route to bone repair. Clinical translation of such endochondral tissue engineering strategies will require overcoming a number of challenges, including the engineering of large and often anatomically complex cartilage grafts, as well as the persistence of core regions of avascular cartilage following their implantation into large bone defects. Here 3D printing technology is utilized to develop a versatile and scalable approach to guide vascularisation during endochondral bone repair. First, a sacrificial pluronic ink was used to 3D print interconnected microchannel networks in a mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) laden gelatin-methacryloyl (GelMA) hydrogel. These constructs (with and without microchannels) were next chondrogenically primed in vitro and then implanted into critically sized femoral bone defects in rats. The solid and microchanneled cartilage templates enhanced bone repair compared to untreated controls, with the solid cartilage templates (without microchannels) supporting the highest levels of total bone formation. However, the inclusion of 3D printed microchannels was found to promote osteoclast/immune cell invasion, hydrogel degradation, and vascularisation following implantation. In addition, the endochondral bone tissue engineering strategy was found to support comparable levels of bone healing to BMP-2 delivery, whilst promoting lower levels of heterotopic bone formation, with the microchanneled templates supporting the lowest levels of heterotopic bone formation. Taken together, these results demonstrate that 3D printed hypertrophic cartilage grafts represent a promising approach for the repair of complex bone fractures, particularly for larger defects where vascularisation will be a key challenge.
AUTHOR Ng, Wei Long and Qi, Jovina Tan Zhi and Yeong, Wai Yee and Naing, May Win
Title Proof-of-concept: 3D bioprinting of pigmented human skin constructs [Abstract]
Year 2018
Journal/Proceedings Biofabrication
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Three-dimensional (3D) pigmented human skin constructs have been fabricated using a 3D bioprinting approach. The 3D pigmented human skin constructs are obtained from using three different types of skin cells (keratinocytes, melanocytes and fibroblasts from three different skin donors) and they exhibit similar constitutive pigmentation (pale pigmentation) as the skin donors. A two-step drop-on-demand bioprinting strategy facilitates the deposition of cell droplets to emulate the epidermal melanin units (pre-defined patterning of keratinocytes and melanocytes at the desired positions) and manipulation of the microenvironment to fabricate 3D biomimetic hierarchical porous structures found in native skin tissue. The 3D bioprinted pigmented skin constructs are compared to the pigmented skin constructs fabricated by conventional a manual-casting approach; in-depth characterization of both the 3D pigmented skin constructs has indicated that the 3D bioprinted skin constructs have a higher degree of resemblance to native skin tissue in term of the presence of well-developed stratified epidermal layers and the presence of a continuous layer of basement membrane proteins as compared to the manually-cast samples. The 3D bioprinting approach facilitates the development of 3D in vitro pigmented human skin constructs for potential toxicology testing and fundamental cell biology research.
AUTHOR Khaled, Shaban A. and Burley, Jonathan C. and Alexander, Morgan R. and Yang, Jing and Roberts, Clive J.
Title 3D printing of tablets containing multiple drugs with defined release profiles [Abstract]
Year 2015
Journal/Proceedings International Journal of Pharmaceutics
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Abstract We have employed three-dimensional (3D) extrusion-based printing as a medicine manufacturing technique for the production of multi-active tablets with well-defined and separate controlled release profiles for three different drugs. This ‘polypill’ made by a 3D additive manufacture technique demonstrates that complex medication regimes can be combined in a single tablet and that it is viable to formulate and ‘dial up’ this single tablet for the particular needs of an individual. The tablets used to illustrate this concept incorporate an osmotic pump with the drug captopril and sustained release compartments with the drugs nifedipine and glipizide. This combination of medicines could potentially be used to treat diabetics suffering from hypertension. The room temperature extrusion process used to print the formulations used excipients commonly employed in the pharmaceutical industry. Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) and X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) were used to assess drug–excipient interaction. The printed formulations were evaluated for drug release using {USP} dissolution testing. We found that the captopril portion showed the intended zero order drug release of an osmotic pump and noted that the nifedipine and glipizide portions showed either first order release or Korsmeyer–Peppas release kinetics dependent upon the active/excipient ratio used.
AUTHOR Schaffner, Manuel and Faber, Jakob A. and Pianegonda, Lucas and Rühs, Patrick A. and Coulter, Fergal and Studart, André R.
Title 3D printing of robotic soft actuators with programmable bioinspired architectures [Abstract]
Year 2018
Journal/Proceedings Nature Communications
Reftype Schaffner2018
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Abstract
Soft actuation allows robots to interact safely with humans, other machines, and their surroundings. Full exploitation of the potential of soft actuators has, however, been hindered by the lack of simple manufacturing routes to generate multimaterial parts with intricate shapes and architectures. Here, we report a 3D printing platform for the seamless digital fabrication of pneumatic silicone actuators exhibiting programmable bioinspired architectures and motions. The actuators comprise an elastomeric body whose surface is decorated with reinforcing stripes at a well-defined lead angle. Similar to the fibrous architectures found in muscular hydrostats, the lead angle can be altered to achieve elongation, contraction, or twisting motions. Using a quantitative model based on lamination theory, we establish design principles for the digital fabrication of silicone-based soft actuators whose functional response is programmed within the material's properties and architecture. Exploring such programmability enables 3D printing of a broad range of soft morphing structures.
AUTHOR Schroeder, Thomas B. H. and Guha, Anirvan and Lamoureux, Aaron and VanRenterghem, Gloria and Sept, David and Shtein, Max and Yang, Jerry and Mayer, Michael
Title An electric-eel-inspired soft power source from stacked hydrogels [Abstract]
Year 2017
Journal/Proceedings Nature
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Progress towards the integration of technology into livingo ganisms requires electrical power sources that are biocompatible, mechanically flexible, and able to harness the chemical energy available inside biological systems. Conventional batteries were not designed with these criteria in mind. The electric organ of the knifefish Electrophorus electricus (commonly known as the electric eel) is, however, an example of an electrical power source that operates within biological constraints while featuring power characteristics that include peak potential differences of 600 volts and currents of 1 ampere1,2. Here we introduce an electric eel-inspired power concept that uses gradients of ions between miniature polyacrylamide hydrogel compartments bounded by a repeating sequence of cation- and anion-selective hydrogel membranes. The system uses a scalable stacking or folding geometry that generates 110 volts at open circuit or 27 milliwatts per square metre per gel cell upon simultaneous, self-registered mechanical contact activation of thousands of gel compartments in series while circumventing power dissipation before contact. Unlike typical batteries, these systems are soft, flexible, transparent, and potentially biocompatible. These characteristics suggest that artificial electric organs could be used to power next-generation implant materials such as pacemakers, implantable sensors, or prosthetic devices in hybrids of living and non-living systems3–6.�
AUTHOR Katcharava, Zviadi and Marinow, Anja and Bhandary, Rajesh and Binder, Wolfgang H.
Title 3D Printable Composite Polymer Electrolytes: Influence of SiO2 Nanoparticles on 3D-Printability [Abstract]
Year 2022
Journal/Proceedings Nanomaterials
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We here demonstrate the preparation of composite polymer electrolytes (CPEs) for Li-ion batteries, applicable for 3D printing process via fused deposition modeling. The prepared composites consist of modified poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), lithium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (LiTFSI) and SiO2-based nanofillers. PEG was successfully end group modified yielding telechelic PEG containing either ureidopyrimidone (UPy) or barbiturate moieties, capable to form supramolecular networks via hydrogen bonds, thus introducing self-healing to the electrolyte system. Silica nanoparticles (NPs) were used as a filler for further adjustment of mechanical properties of the electrolyte to enable 3D-printability. The surface functionalization of the NPs with either ionic liquid (IL) or hydrophobic alkyl chains is expected to lead to an improved dispersion of the NPs within the polymer matrix. Composites with different content of NPs (5%, 10%, 15%) and LiTFSI salt (EO/Li+ = 5, 10, 20) were analyzed via rheology for a better understanding of 3D printability, and via Broadband Dielectric Spectroscopy (BDS) for checking their ionic conductivity. The composite electrolyte PEG 1500 UPy2/LiTFSI (EO:Li 5:1) mixed with 15% NP-IL was successfully 3D printed, revealing its suitability for application as printable composite electrolytes.
AUTHOR Kuthe, Sudhanshu and Schlothauer, Arthur and Bodkhe, Sampada and Hulme, Christopher and Ermanni, Paolo
Title 3D printed mechanically representative aortic model made of gelatin fiber reinforced silicone composite [Abstract]
Year 2022
Journal/Proceedings Materials Letters
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Additive manufacturing (AM) is a useful technology to produce artificial aortic models for the training of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) surgery. With AM, the models can be tailored towards the individualized aortic anatomy of patients. Most of these reported models so far are manufactured using single rubber-like materials. However, such materials do not replicate the mechanical properties of natural aortic tissue, especially the stress–strain response in higher strain (>0.1) regions. This could be problematic for surgeons training for surgeries using a model which does not exhibit properties of the real aorta. To overcome this limitation, we developed a 3D-printed, mechanically representative aortic model comprising gelatin fibers and silicone. The model is promising as a realistic analog of aortic sinus for mock TAVR surgery. Computerized tomography data was analyzed beforehand using medical imaging to identify the anatomy of a specific patient’s aortic sinus and the surrounding blood vessels. A novel silicone matrix composite reinforced with gelatin fibers designed in this work was tested and compared with the stress–strain response of aortic tissue. Such a model comprising both patient-specific geometries as well as realistic material properties of aortic tissue can be helpful for the development of next-generation medical phantoms.
AUTHOR von Mässenhausen, Anne and Gonzalez, Nadia Zamora and Maremonti, Francesca and Belavgeni, Alexia and Tonnus, Wulf and Meyer, Claudia and Beer, Kristina and Hannani, Monica T. and Lau, Arthur and Peitzsch, Mirko and Hoppenz, Paul and Locke, Sophie and Chavakis, Triantafyllos and Kramann, Rafael and Muruve, Daniel A. and Hugo, Christian and Bornstein, Stefan R. and Linkermann, Andreas
Title Dexamethasone sensitizes to ferroptosis by glucocorticoid receptor–induced dipeptidase-1 expression and glutathione depletion [Abstract]
Year 2022
Journal/Proceedings Science Advances
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Abstract
Dexamethasone is widely used as an immunosuppressive therapy and recently as COVID-19 treatment. Here, we demonstrate that dexamethasone sensitizes to ferroptosis, a form of iron-catalyzed necrosis, previously suggested to contribute to diseases such as acute kidney injury, myocardial infarction, and stroke, all of which are triggered by glutathione (GSH) depletion. GSH levels were significantly decreased by dexamethasone. Mechanistically, we identified that dexamethasone up-regulated the GSH metabolism regulating protein dipeptidase-1 (DPEP1) in a glucocorticoid receptor (GR)–dependent manner. DPEP1 knockdown reversed the phenotype of dexamethasone-induced ferroptosis sensitization. Ferroptosis inhibitors, the DPEP1 inhibitor cilastatin, or genetic DPEP1 inactivation reversed the dexamethasone-induced increase in tubular necrosis in freshly isolated renal tubules. Our data indicate that dexamethasone sensitizes to ferroptosis by a GR-mediated increase in DPEP1 expression and GSH depletion. Together, we identified a previously unknown mechanism of glucocorticoid-mediated sensitization to ferroptosis bearing clinical and therapeutic implications. Dexamethasone leads to GR-mediated increased DPEP1 expression and GSH depletion, resulting in higher ferroptosis sensitivity.
AUTHOR Da Silva, Aruã Clayton and Wang, Junzhi and Minev, Ivan Rusev
Title Electro-assisted printing of soft hydrogels via controlled electrochemical reactions [Abstract]
Year 2022
Journal/Proceedings Nature Communications
Reftype Da Silva2022
DOI/URL DOI
Abstract
Hydrogels underpin many applications in tissue engineering, cell encapsulation, drug delivery and bioelectronics. Methods improving control over gelation mechanisms and patterning are still needed. Here we explore a less-known gelation approach relying on sequential electrochemical-chemical-chemical (ECC) reactions. An ionic species and/or molecule in solution is oxidised over a conductive surface at a specific electric potential. The oxidation generates an intermediate species that reacts with a macromolecule, forming a hydrogel at the electrode-electrolyte interface. We introduce potentiostatic control over this process, allowing the selection of gelation reactions and control of hydrogel growth rate. In chitosan and alginate systems, we demonstrate precipitation, covalent and ionic gelation mechanisms. The method can be applied in the polymerisation of hybrid systems consisting of more than one polymer. We demonstrate concomitant deposition of the conductive polymer Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) and alginate. Deposition of the hydrogels occurs in small droplets held between a conductive plate (working electrode, WE), a printing nozzle (counter electrode, CE) and a pseudoreference electrode (reference electrode, RE). We install this setup on a commercial 3D printer to demonstrate patterning of adherent hydrogels on gold and flexible ITO foils. Electro-assisted printing may contribute to the integration of well-defined hydrogels on hybrid electronic-hydrogel devices for bioelectronics applications.
AUTHOR Strauß, Svenja and Schroth, Bianca and Hubbuch, Jürgen
Title Evaluation of the Reproducibility and Robustness of Extrusion-Based Bioprinting Processes Applying a Flow Sensor [Abstract]
Year 2022
Journal/Proceedings Frontiers in bioengineering and biotechnology
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DOI/URL URL DOI
Abstract
Bioprinting is increasingly regarded as a suitable additive manufacturing method in biopharmaceutical process development and formulation. In order to manage the leap from research to industrial application, higher levels of reproducibility and a standardized bioprinting process are prerequisites. This said, the concept of process analytical technologies, standard in the biopharmaceutical industry, is still at its very early steps. To date most extrusion-based printing processes are controlled over penumatic pressure and thus not adaptive to environmental or system related changes over several experimental runs. A constant set pressure applied over a number of runs, might lead to variations in flow rate and thus to unreliable printed constructs. With this in mind, the simple question arises whether a printing process based on a set flow rate could improve reproduciblity and transfer to different printing systems. The control and monitoring of flow rate aim to introduce the concept of PAT in the field of bioprinting. This study investigates the effect of different processing modes (set pressure vs. set flow rate) on printing reproducibility occurring during an extrusion-based printing process consisting of 6 experimental runs consisting of 3 printed samples each. Additionally, the influence of different filling levels of the ink containing cartridge during a printing process was determined. Different solutions based on a varying amount of alginate polymer and Kolliphor hydrogels in varying concentrations showed the need for individual setting of printing parameter. To investigate parameter transferability among different devices two different printers were used and the flow was monitored using a flow sensor attached to the printing unit. It could be demonstrated that a set flow rate controlled printing process improved accuracy and the filling level also affects the accuracy of printing, the magnitude of this effects varies as the cartridge level declined. The transferability between printed devices was eased by setting the printing parameters according to a set flow rate of each bioink disregarding the value of the set pressure. Finally, by a bioprinting porcess control based on a set flow rate, the coefficient of variance for printed objects could be reduced from 0.2 to 0.02 for 10% (w/v) alginate polymer solutions.
AUTHOR Rahimnejad, Maedeh and Adoungotchodo, Atma and Demarquette, Nicole R. and Lerouge, Sophie
Title FRESH bioprinting of biodegradable chitosan thermosensitive hydrogels [Abstract]
Year 2022
Journal/Proceedings Bioprinting
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DOI/URL URL DOI
Abstract
Thermosensitive chitosan (CH)-based hydrogels prepared with a mix of sodium bicarbonate and β-glycerophosphate as gelling agents rapidly pass from a liquid at room temperature to a mechanically strong solid at body temperature without any crosslinker. They show excellent potential for tissue engineering applications and could be interesting candidates for bioprinting. Unfortunately, since gelation is not instantaneous, formulations compatible with cell encapsulation (chitosan concentrations around 2% or lower) lead to very poor resolution and fidelity due to filament spreading. Here, we investigate the FRESH bioprinting approach with a warm sacrificial support bath, to overcome these limitations and enhance their bioprintability. First, a support bath, made of Pluronic including sodium chloride salt as a rheology modifier agent, was designed to meet the specific physical state requirements (solid at 37 °C and liquid at room temperature) and rheological properties appropriate for bioprinting. This support bath presented yield stress of over 100 Pa, a shear thinning behavior, and fast self-healing during cyclic recovery tests. Three different chitosan hydrogels (CH2%w/v, CH3%w/v, and a mixture of CH and gelatin) were tested for their ability to form filament and 3D structures, with and without a support bath. Both the resolution and mechanical properties of the printed structure were drastically enhanced using the FRESH method, with an approximate four fold decrease of the filament diameter which is close to the needle diameter. The printed structures were easily harvested without altering their shape by cooling down the support bath, and do not swell when immersed in PBS. Live/dead assays confirmed that the viability of encapsulated mesenchymal stem cells was highest in CH2% and that the support bath-assisted bioprinting process did not adversely impact cell viability. This study demonstrates that using a warm FRESH-like approach drastically enhances the potential for bioprinting of the thermosensitive biodegradable chitosan hydrogels and opens up a wide range of applications for 3D models and tissue engineering.
AUTHOR Li, Ming-Chia and Chang, Pu-Yuan and Luo, Huai-Rou and Chang, Ling-Yuan and Lin, Chuan-Yi and Yang, Chih-Yu and Lee, Oscar Kuang-Sheng and Lee, Yan-Hwa Wu and Tarng, Der-Cherng
Title Functioning tailor-made 3D-printed vascular graft for hemodialysis [Abstract]
Year 2022
Journal/Proceedings The Journal of Vascular Access
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DOI/URL DOI
Abstract
Background:The two ends of arteriovenous graft (AVG) are anastomosed to the upper limb vessels by surgery for hemodialysis therapy. However, the size of upper limb vessels varies to a large extent among different individuals.Methods:According to the shape and size of neck vessels quantified from the preoperative computed tomography angiographic scan, the ethylene-vinyl acetate (EVA)-based AVG was produced in H-shape by the three-dimensional (3D) printer and then sterilized. This study investigated the function of this novel 3D-printed AVG in vitro and in vivo.Results:This 3D-printed AVG can be implanted in the rabbit’s common carotid artery and common jugular vein with ease and functions in vivo. The surgical procedure was quick, and no suture was required. The blood loss was minimal, and no hematoma was noted at least 1 week after the surgery. The blood flow velocity within the implanted AVG was 14.9 ± 3.7 cm/s. Additionally, the in vitro characterization experiments demonstrated that this EVA-based biomaterial is biocompatible and possesses a superior recovery property than ePTFE after hemodialysis needle cannulation.Conclusions:Through the 3D printing technology, the EVA-based AVG can be tailor-made to fit the specific vessel size. This kind of 3D-printed AVG is functioning in vivo, and our results realize personalized vascular implants. Further large-animal studies are warranted to examine the long-term patency.
AUTHOR Yan Li and Lijing Huang and Guangpin Tai and Feifei Yan and Lin Cai and Chenxing Xin and Shamoon {Al Islam}
Title Graphene Oxide-loaded magnetic nanoparticles within 3D hydrogel form High-performance scaffolds for bone regeneration and tumour treatment [Abstract]
Year 2022
Journal/Proceedings Composites Part A: Applied Science and Manufacturing
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DOI/URL URL DOI
Abstract
The treatment of tumour-related bone defects should ideally combine bone regeneration with tumour treatment. Additive manufacturing (AM) could feasibly place functional bone-repair materials within composite materials with functional-grade structures, giving them bone repair and anti-tumour effects. Magnetothermal therapy is a promising non-invasive method of tumour treatment that has attracted increasing attention. In this study, we prepared novel hydrogel composite scaffolds of polyvinyl alcohol/sodium alginate/hydroxyapatite (PVA/SA/HA) at low temperature via AM. The scaffolds were loaded with various concentrations of magnetic graphene oxide (MGO) @Fe3O4 nanoparticles. The scaffolds were characterised by fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), which showed that the scaffolds have good moulding qualities and strong hydrogen bonding between the MGO/PVA/SA/HA components. TGA analysis demonstrated the expected thermal stability of the MGO and scaffolds. Thermal effects can be adjusted by varying the contents of MGO and the strength of an external alternating magnetic field. The prepared MGO hydrogel composite scaffolds enhance biological functions and support bone mesenchymal stem cell differentiation in vitro. The scaffolds also show favourable anti-tumour characteristics with effective magnetothermal conversion in vivo.
AUTHOR Liu, Chuan and Campbell, Scott B. and Li, Jianzhao and Bannerman, Dawn and Pascual-Gil, Simon and Kieda, Jennifer and Wu, Qinghua and Herman, Peter R. and Radisic, Milica
Title High Throughput Omnidirectional Printing of Tubular Microstructures from Elastomeric Polymers [Abstract]
Year 2022
Journal/Proceedings Advanced Healthcare Materials
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DOI/URL DOI
Abstract
Abstract Bioelastomers have been extensively used in biomedical applications due to their desirable mechanical strength, tunable properties, and chemical versatility; however, 3D printing bioelastomers into microscale structures has proven elusive. Herein, a high throughput omnidirectional printing approach via coaxial extrusion is described that fabricated perfusable elastomeric microtubes of unprecedently small inner diameter (350-550 μm) and wall thickness (40-60 μm). The versatility of this approach was shown through the printing of two different polymeric elastomers, followed by photocrosslinking and removal of the fugitive inner phase. Designed experiments were used to tune the dimensions and stiffness of the microtubes to match that of native ex vivo rat vasculature. This approach afforded the fabrication of multiple biomimetic shapes resembling cochlea and kidney glomerulus and afforded facile, high-throughput generation of perfusable structures that can be seeded with endothelial cells for biomedical applications. Post-printing laser micromachining was performed to generate numerous micro-sized holes (5-20 μm) in the tube wall to tune microstructure permeability. Importantly, for organ-on-a-chip applications, the described approach took only 3.6 minutes to print microtubes (without microholes) over an entire 96-well plate device, in contrast to comparable hole-free structures that take between 1.5 to 6.5 days to fabricate using a manual 3D stamping approach. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved
AUTHOR Kim, Jieun and Lee, Joohyung
Title Liquid-Suspended and Liquid-Bridged Liquid Metal Microdroplets [Abstract]
Year 2022
Journal/Proceedings Small
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DOI/URL DOI
Abstract
Abstract Liquid metals (LMs) and alloys are attracting increasing attention owing to their combined advantages of high conductivity and fluidity, and have shown promising results in various emerging applications. Patterning technologies using LMs are being actively researched; among them, direct ink writing is considered a potentially viable approach for efficient LM additive manufacturing. However, true LM additive manufacturing with arbitrary printing geometries remains challenging because of the intrinsically low rheological strength of LMs. Herein, colloidal suspensions of LM droplets amenable to additive manufacturing (or “3D printing”) are realized using formulations containing minute amounts of liquid capillary bridges. The resulting LM suspensions exhibit exceptionally high rheological strength with yield stress values well above 103 Pa, attributed to inter-droplet capillary attraction mediated by the liquid bridges adsorbed on the oxide skin of the LM droplets. Such liquid-bridged LM suspensions, as extrudable ink-type filaments, are based on uncurable continuous-phase liquid media, have a long pot-life and outstanding shear-thinning properties, and shape retention, demonstrating excellent rheological processability suitable for 3D printing. These findings will enable the emergence of a variety of new advanced applications that necessitate LM patterning into highly complicated multidimensional structures.
AUTHOR Nadernezhad, Ali and Groll, Jürgen
Title Machine Learning Reveals a General Understanding of Printability in Formulations Based on Rheology Additives [Abstract]
Year 2022
Journal/Proceedings Advanced Science
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DOI/URL DOI
Abstract
Abstract Hydrogel ink formulations based on rheology additives are becoming increasingly popular as they enable 3-dimensional (3D) printing of non-printable but biologically relevant materials. Despite the widespread use, a generalized understanding of how these hydrogel formulations become printable is still missing, mainly due to their variety and diversity. Employing an interpretable machine learning approach allows the authors to explain the process of rendering printability through bulk rheological indices, with no bias toward the composition of formulations and the type of rheology additives. Based on an extensive library of rheological data and printability scores for 180 different formulations, 13 critical rheological measures that describe the printability of hydrogel formulations, are identified. Using advanced statistical methods, it is demonstrated that even though unique criteria to predict printability on a global scale are highly unlikely, the accretive and collaborative nature of rheological measures provides a qualitative and physically interpretable guideline for designing new printable materials.
AUTHOR Paterson, T. E. and Hagis, N. and Boufidis, D. and Wang, Q. and Moore, S. R. and da Silva, A. C. and Mitchell, R. L. and Alix, J. J. P. and Minev, I. R.
Title Monitoring of hand function enabled by low complexity sensors printed on textile [Abstract]
Year 2022
Journal/Proceedings Flexible and Printed Electronics
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DOI/URL DOI
Abstract
Development of inexpensive, disposable, use-at-home, personalised health wearables can revolutionise clinical trial design and clinical care. Recent approaches have focused on electronic skins, which are complex systems of sensors and wiring produced by integration of multiple materials and layers. The requirement for high-end clean room microfabrication techniques create challenges for the development of such devices. Drawing inspiration from the ancient art of henna tattoos, where an artist draws designs directly on the hand by extruding a decorative ink, we developed a simple strategy for direct writing (3D printing) of bioelectronic sensors on textile. The sensors are realised using a very limited set of low-cost inks composed only of graphite flakes and silicone. By adapting sensor architectures in two dimensions, we produced electromyography (EMG), strain and pressure sensors. The sensors are printed directly onto stretchable textile (cotton) gloves and function as an integrated multimodal monitoring system for hand function. Gloves demonstrated functionality and stability by recording simultaneous readings of pinch strength, thumb movement (flexion) and EMG of the abductor pollicis brevis muscle over 5 days of daily recordings. Our approach is targeted towards a home based monitoring of hand function, with potential applications across a range of neurological and musculoskeletal conditions.
AUTHOR Sarmin, Atiya M. and El Moussaid, Nadia and Suntornnond, Ratima and Tyler, Eleanor J. and Kim, Yang-Hee and Di Cio, Stefania and Megone, William V. and Pearce, Oliver and Gautrot, Julien E. and Dawson, Jonathan and Connelly, John T.
Title Multi-Scale Analysis of the Composition, Structure, and Function of Decellularized Extracellular Matrix for Human Skin and Wound Healing Models [Abstract]
Year 2022
Journal/Proceedings Biomolecules
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DOI/URL URL DOI
Abstract
The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a complex mixture of structural proteins, proteoglycans, and signaling molecules that are essential for tissue integrity and homeostasis. While a number of recent studies have explored the use of decellularized ECM (dECM) as a biomaterial for tissue engineering, the complete composition, structure, and mechanics of these materials remain incompletely understood. In this study, we performed an in-depth characterization of skin-derived dECM biomaterials for human skin equivalent (HSE) models. The dECM materials were purified from porcine skin, and through mass spectrometry profiling, we quantified the presence of major ECM molecules, including types I, III, and VI collagen, fibrillin, and lumican. Rheological analysis demonstrated the sol-gel and shear-thinning properties of dECM materials, indicating their physical suitability as a tissue scaffold, while electron microscopy revealed a complex, hierarchical structure of nanofibers in dECM hydrogels. The dECM materials were compatible with advanced biofabrication techniques, including 3D printing within a gelatin microparticle support bath, printing with a sacrificial material, or blending with other ECM molecules to achieve more complex compositions and structures. As a proof of concept, we also demonstrate how dECM materials can be fabricated into a 3D skin wound healing model using 3D printing. Skin-derived dECM therefore represents a complex and versatile biomaterial with advantageous properties for the fabrication of next-generation HSEs.
AUTHOR Rupp, Harald and Bhandary, Rajesh and Kulkarni, Amit and Binder, Wolfgang
Title Printable Electrolytes: Tuning 3D-Printing by Multiple Hydrogen Bonds and Added Inorganic Lithium-Salts [Abstract]
Year 2022
Journal/Proceedings Advanced Materials Technologies
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DOI/URL DOI
Abstract
Abstract Here, the 3D-printing of supramolecular polymer electrolytes is reported, able to be manufactured via 3D-printing processes, additionally dynamically compensating for volume changes. A careful mechanical design, in addition to rheological effects observed for different additives to the electrolyte, is investigated and adjusted, in order to achieve printability via an extrusion process to generate a conductive electrode material. Qudruple-hydrogen bonds (UPy) act as supramolecular entities for the desired dynamic properties to adjust printability, in addition to added LiTFSi-salts to achieve ionic conductivities of ≈10–4 S cm–1 at T = 80 °C. Three different telechelic UPy-PEO/PPO-UPy-polymers with molecular weights ranging from Mn = 600–1500 g mol−1 were investigated in view of their 3D-printability by FDM-processes. It is found that there are three effects counterbalancing the rheological properties of the polymers: besides temperatures, which can be used as a known tool to adjust melt-rheology, also the addition of lithium-salts in junction with the polymers crystallinity exerts a major toolbox to 3D-print these electrolytes. Using specific compositions with Li/EO-ratios from 20:1, 10:1, and 5:1, the rheological profile can be adjusted to reach the required printability window. AT-IR-investigations clearly indicate a weakening of the UPy-bonds by the added Li+ ions, in addition to a reduction of the crystallinity of the PEO-units, further changing the rheological profile. The so generated electrolytes are printable systems for novel electrolytes.
AUTHOR Wang, Ruiqi and Deng, Shuai and Wu, Yuping and Wei, Haiying and Jing, Guangping and Zhang, Bosong and Liu, Fengzhen and Tian, Hui and Chen, Xiongbiao and Tian, Weiming
Title Remodelling 3D printed GelMA-HA corneal scaffolds by cornea stromal cells [Abstract]
Year 2022
Journal/Proceedings Colloid and Interface Science Communications
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DOI/URL URL DOI
Abstract
Engineering scaffolds with a structure mimicking that of native cornea allows for addressing the severe donor shortage for the corneal blindness treatment, which, however, remains challenging. In the light that corneal stromal (CS) cells can play a key role in corneal stroma formation, in this study we incorporated CS cells into three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds printed from hyaluronic acid-modified gelatin-methacrylate (GelMA-HA) scaffolds and characterized the scaffolds in terms of remodeled extracellular matrix (ECM) in vitro. Our results illustrated that the modification of GelMA by HA allowed for 3D printing of corneal scaffolds and further improved the characteristics of primary rabbit-derived corneal stromal cells for remodelling scaffolds. After 60 days, we decellularized the remodeled corneal scaffolds and examined their optical properties; and our results demonstrated that the 3D printed corneal scaffolds provided CS cells with cues that guided them toward the directional and spatial organization and facilitated the ECM remodelling.
AUTHOR Demirörs, Ahmet F. and Poloni, Erik and Chiesa, Maddalena and Bargardi, Fabio L. and Binelli, Marco R. and Woigk, Wilhelm and de Castro, Lucas D. C. and Kleger, Nicole and Coulter, Fergal B. and Sicher, Alba and Galinski, Henning and Scheffold, Frank and Studart, André R.
Title Three-dimensional printing of photonic colloidal glasses into objects with isotropic structural color [Abstract]
Year 2022
Journal/Proceedings Nature Communications
Reftype Demirörs2022
DOI/URL DOI
Abstract
Structural color is frequently exploited by living organisms for biological functions and has also been translated into synthetic materials as a more durable and less hazardous alternative to conventional pigments. Additive manufacturing approaches were recently exploited for the fabrication of exquisite photonic objects, but the angle-dependence observed limits a broader application of structural color in synthetic systems. Here, we propose a manufacturing platform for the 3D printing of complex-shaped objects that display isotropic structural color generated from photonic colloidal glasses. Structurally colored objects are printed from aqueous colloidal inks containing monodisperse silica particles, carbon black, and a gel-forming copolymer. Rheology and Small-Angle-X-Ray-Scattering measurements are performed to identify the processing conditions leading to printed objects with tunable structural colors. Multimaterial printing is eventually used to create complex-shaped objects with multiple structural colors using silica and carbon as abundant and sustainable building blocks.
AUTHOR Shin, Crystal S. and Cabrera, Fernando J. and Lee, Richard and Kim, John and Ammassam Veettil, Remya and Zaheer, Mahira and Adumbumkulath, Aparna and Mhatre, Kirti and Ajayan, Pulickel M. and Curley, Steven A. and Scott, Bradford G. and Acharya, Ghanashyam
Title 3D-Bioprinted Inflammation Modulating Polymer Scaffolds for Soft Tissue Repair [Abstract]
Year 2021
Journal/Proceedings Advanced Materials
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DOI/URL DOI
Abstract
Abstract Development of inflammation modulating polymer scaffolds for soft tissue repair with minimal postsurgical complications is a compelling clinical need. However, the current standard of care soft tissue repair meshes for hernia repair is highly inflammatory and initiates a dysregulated inflammatory process causing visceral adhesions and postsurgical complications. Herein, the development of an inflammation modulating biomaterial scaffold (bioscaffold) for soft tissue repair is presented. The bioscaffold design is based on the idea that, if the excess proinflammatory cytokines are sequestered from the site of injury by the surgical implantation of a bioscaffold, the inflammatory response can be modulated, and the visceral adhesion formations and postsurgical complications can be minimized. The bioscaffold is fabricated by 3D-bioprinting of an in situ phosphate crosslinked poly(vinyl alcohol) polymer. In vivo efficacy of the bioscaffold is evaluated in a rat ventral hernia model. In vivo proinflammatory cytokine expression analysis and histopathological analysis of the tissues have confirmed that the bioscaffold acts as an inflammation trap and captures the proinflammatory cytokines secreted at the implant site and effectively modulates the local inflammation without the need for exogenous anti-inflammatory agents. The bioscaffold is very effective in inhibiting visceral adhesions formation and minimizing postsurgical complications.
AUTHOR Junghyun Lee and Chong {Yang Chuah} and Wen {See Tan} and Juha Song and Tae-Hyun Bae
Title 3D-printed monolithic porous adsorbents from a solution-processible, hypercrosslinkable, functionalizable polymer [Abstract]
Year 2021
Journal/Proceedings Chemical Engineering Journal
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DOI/URL URL DOI
Abstract
Solid adsorbents have been actively developed for energy-efficient gas separations including carbon capture and air purification. However, conventional particulate adsorbents often show ineffective mass transfer and significant pressure drop in practical operations, leading to a limited overall performance. As a potential solution to these issues, the development of three-dimensionally (3D) structured adsorbents has been proposed. Herein, we report a novel approach to design 3D monolithic adsorbents for CO2 separation via 3D printing of a processible polymer, which in turn can be transformed into a functional porous material via hypercrosslinking and amine-grafting. Importantly, such structure can be realized without an aid from binders or mechanical supports. Our adsorbents demonstrated a promising CO2 adsorption performance without experiencing any pressure drop under dynamic flow condition. The stability and regenerability, which are also important requirements for practical operations, were also successfully demonstrated through a repetitive adsorption-desorption cycling test in the presence of water vapor. We envisage that our approach can be applied in the development of structurally versatile adsorbents for various gas separation processes.
AUTHOR Golafshan, Nasim and Willemsen, Koen and Kadumudi, Firoz Babu and Vorndran, Elke and Dolatshahi-Pirouz, Alireza and Weinans, Harrie and van der Wal, Bart C. H. and Malda, Jos and Castilho, Miguel
Title 3D-Printed Regenerative Magnesium Phosphate Implant Ensures Stability and Restoration of Hip Dysplasia [Abstract]
Year 2021
Journal/Proceedings Advanced Healthcare Materials
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DOI/URL DOI
Abstract
Abstract Osteoarthritis of the hip is a painful and debilitating condition commonly occurring in humans and dogs. One of the main causes that leads to hip osteoarthritis is hip dysplasia. Although the current surgical methods to correct dysplasia work satisfactorily in many circumstances, these are associated with serious complications, tissue resorption, and degeneration. In this study, a one-step fabrication of a regenerative hip implant with a patient-specific design and load-bearing properties is reported. The regenerative hip implant is fabricated based on patient imaging files and by an extrusion assisted 3D printing process using a flexible, bone-inducing biomaterial. The novel implant can be fixed with metallic screws to host bone and can be loaded up to physiological loads without signs of critical permanent deformation or failure. Moreover, after exposing the hip implant to accelerated in vitro degradation, it is confirmed that it is still able to support physiological loads even after losing ≈40% of its initial mass. In addition, the osteopromotive properties of the novel hip implant is demonstrated as shown by an increased expression of osteonectin and osteocalcin by cultured human mesenchymal stem cells after 21 days. Overall, the proposed hip implant provides an innovative regenerative and mechanically stable solution for hip dysplasia treatment.
AUTHOR Kwak, Chaesu and Young Ryu, Seoung and Park, Hyunsu and Lim, Sehyeong and Yang, Jeewon and Kim, Jieun and Hyung Kim, Jin and Lee, Joohyung
Title A pickering emulsion stabilized by chlorella microalgae as an eco-friendly extrusion-based 3D printing ink processable under ambient conditions [Abstract]
Year 2021
Journal/Proceedings Journal of Colloid and Interface Science
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DOI/URL URL DOI
Abstract
Three-dimensional (3D) printing technology is actively utilized in various industrial fields because it facilitates effective and customizable fabrication of complex structures. An important processing route for 3D printing is the extrusion of inks in the form of colloidal suspensions or emulsions, which has recently attracted considerable attention because it allows for selection of a wide range of printing materials and is operable under ambient processing conditions. Herein, we investigate the 3D printability of complex fluids containing chlorella microalgae as an eco-friendly material for 3D printing. Two possible ink types are considered: aqueous chlorella suspensions and emulsions of oil and water mixtures. While the aqueous chlorella suspensions at high particle loading display the 3D-printable rheological properties such as high yield stress and good shape retention, the final structures after extruding and drying the suspensions under ambient conditions show a significant number of macroscopic defects, limiting their practical application. In contrast, the 3D structures produced from the oil-in-water Pickering emulsions stabilized by chlorella microalgae, which are amphiphilic and active at the oil–water interface, show significantly reduced defect formation. Addition of a fast-evaporable oil phase, hexane, is crucial in the mechanisms of enhanced cementation between the individual microalgae via increased inter-particle packing, capillary attraction, and hydrophobic interaction. Furthermore, addition of solid paraffin wax, which is crystalline but well-soluble in the hydrocarbon oil phase under ambient conditions, completely eliminates the undesirable defect formation via enhanced inter-particle binding, while maintaining the overall rheological properties of the emulsion. The optimal formulation of the Pickering emulsion is finally employed to produce a 3D scaffold of satisfactory structural integrity, suggesting that the chlorella-based ink, in the form of an emulsion, has potential as an eco-friendly 3D printing ink processable under ambient conditions.
AUTHOR Zuoxin Zhou and Mario Samperi and Lea Santu and Glenieliz Dizon and Shereen Aboarkaba and David Limón and David Limón and Christopher Tuck and Lluïsa Pérez-García and Derek J. Irvine and David B. Amabilino and Ricky Wildman
Title An Imidazolium-Based Supramolecular Gelator Enhancing Interlayer Adhesion in 3D Printed Dual Network Hydrogels [Abstract]
Year 2021
Journal/Proceedings Materials & Design
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DOI/URL URL DOI
Abstract
The variety of UV-curable monomers for 3D printing is limited by a requirement for rapid curing after each sweep depositing a layer. This study proposes to trigger supramolecular self-assembly during the process by a gemini imidazolium-based low-molecular-weight gelator, allowing printing of certain monomers. The as-printed hydrogel structures were supported by a gelator network immobilising monomer:water solutions. A thixotropic hydrogel was formed with a recovery time of < 50 seconds, storage modulus = 8.1 kPa and yield stress = 18 Pa, processable using material-extrusion 3D printing. Material-extrusion 3D printed objects are usually highly anisotropic, but in this case the gelator network improved the isotropy by subverting the usual layer-by-layer curing strategy. The monomer in all printed layers was cured simultaneously during post-processing to form a continuous polymeric network. The two networks then physically interpenetrate to enhance mechanical performance. The double-network hydrogels fabricated with layers cured simultaneously showed 62-147 % increases in tensile properties compared to layer-by-layer cured hydrogels. The results demonstrated excellent inter- and intra-layered coalescence. Consequently, the tensile properties of 3D printed hydrogels were close to mould cast objects. This study has demonstrated the benefits of using gelators to expand the variety of 3D printable monomers and shown improved isotropy to offer excellent mechanical performances.
AUTHOR Falcones, Bryan and Sanz-Fraile, Héctor and Marhuenda, Esther and Mendizábal, Irene and Cabrera-Aguilera, Ignacio and Malandain, Nanthilde and Uriarte, Juan J. and Almendros, Isaac and Navajas, Daniel and Weiss, Daniel J. and Farré, Ramon and Otero, Jorge
Title Bioprintable Lung Extracellular Matrix Hydrogel Scaffolds for 3D Culture of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells [Abstract]
Year 2021
Journal/Proceedings Polymers
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DOI/URL URL DOI
Abstract
Mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC)-based cell therapy in acute respiratory diseases is based on MSC secretion of paracrine factors. Several strategies have proposed to improve this are being explored including pre-conditioning the MSCs prior to administration. We here propose a strategy for improving the therapeutic efficacy of MSCs based on cell preconditioning by growing them in native extracellular matrix (ECM) derived from the lung. To this end, a bioink with tunable stiffness based on decellularized porcine lung ECM hydrogels was developed and characterized. The bioink was suitable for 3D culturing of lung-resident MSCs without the need for additional chemical or physical crosslinking. MSCs showed good viability, and contraction assays showed the existence of cell–matrix interactions in the bioprinted scaffolds. Adhesion capacity and length of the focal adhesions formed were increased for the cells cultured within the lung hydrogel scaffolds. Also, there was more than a 20-fold increase of the expression of the CXCR4 receptor in the 3D-cultured cells compared to the cells cultured in plastic. Secretion of cytokines when cultured in an in vitro model of lung injury showed a decreased secretion of pro-inflammatory mediators for the cells cultured in the 3D scaffolds. Moreover, the morphology of the harvested cells was markedly different with respect to conventionally (2D) cultured MSCs. In conclusion, the developed bioink can be used to bioprint structures aimed to improve preconditioning MSCs for therapeutic purposes.
AUTHOR Li, Huijun and Zheng, Han and Tan, Yu Jun and Tor, Shu Beng and Zhou, Kun
Title Development of an Ultrastretchable Double-Network Hydrogel for Flexible Strain Sensors [Abstract]
Year 2021
Journal/Proceedings ACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces
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DOI/URL DOI
Abstract
The weak mechanical properties of hydrogels due to the inefficient dissipation of energy in the intrinsic structures limit their practical applications. Here, a double-network (DN) hydrogel has been developed by integrating an ionically cross-linked agar network, a covalently cross-linked acrylic acid (AAC) network, and the dynamic and reversible ionically cross-linked coordination between the AAC chains and Fe3+ ions. The proposed model reveals the mechanisms of the improved mechanical performances in the DN agar/AAC-Fe3+ hydrogel. The hydrogen-bond cross-linked double helices of agar and ionic-coordination interactions of AAC-Fe3+ can be temporarily sacrificed during large deformation to readily dissipate the energy, whereas the reversible AAC-Fe3+ interactions can be regenerated after stress relief, which greatly increases the material toughness. The developed DN hydrogel demonstrates a remarkable stretchability with a break strain up to 3174.3%, high strain sensitivity with the gauge factor being 0.83 under a strain of 1000%, and good 3D printability, making the material a desirable candidate for fabricating flexible strain sensors, electronic skin, and soft robots. The weak mechanical properties of hydrogels due to the inefficient dissipation of energy in the intrinsic structures limit their practical applications. Here, a double-network (DN) hydrogel has been developed by integrating an ionically cross-linked agar network, a covalently cross-linked acrylic acid (AAC) network, and the dynamic and reversible ionically cross-linked coordination between the AAC chains and Fe3+ ions. The proposed model reveals the mechanisms of the improved mechanical performances in the DN agar/AAC-Fe3+ hydrogel. The hydrogen-bond cross-linked double helices of agar and ionic-coordination interactions of AAC-Fe3+ can be temporarily sacrificed during large deformation to readily dissipate the energy, whereas the reversible AAC-Fe3+ interactions can be regenerated after stress relief, which greatly increases the material toughness. The developed DN hydrogel demonstrates a remarkable stretchability with a break strain up to 3174.3%, high strain sensitivity with the gauge factor being 0.83 under a strain of 1000%, and good 3D printability, making the material a desirable candidate for fabricating flexible strain sensors, electronic skin, and soft robots.
AUTHOR Chen, Shengyang and Shi, Qian and Jang, Taesik and Ibrahim, Mohammed Shahrudin Bin and Deng, Jingyu and Ferracci, Gaia and Tan, Wen See and Cho, Nam-Joon and Song, Juha
Title Engineering Natural Pollen Grains as Multifunctional 3D Printing Materials [Abstract]
Year 2021
Journal/Proceedings Advanced Functional Materials
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Abstract
Abstract The development of multifunctional 3D printing materials from sustainable natural resources is a high priority in additive manufacturing. Using an eco-friendly method to transform hard pollen grains into stimulus-responsive microgel particles, we engineered a pollen-derived microgel suspension that can serve as a functional reinforcement for composite hydrogel inks and as a supporting matrix for versatile freeform 3D printing systems. The pollen microgel particles enabled the printing of composite inks and improved the mechanical and physiological stabilities of alginate and hyaluronic acid hydrogel scaffolds for 3D cell culture applications. Moreover, the particles endowed the inks with stimulus-responsive controlled release properties. The suitability of the pollen microgel suspension as a supporting matrix for freeform 3D printing of alginate and silicone rubber inks was demonstrated and optimized by tuning the rheological properties of the microgel. Compared with other classes of natural materials, pollen grains have several compelling features, including natural abundance, renewability, affordability, processing ease, monodispersity, and tunable rheological features, which make them attractive candidates to engineer advanced materials for 3D printing applications.
AUTHOR Zhang, Danwei and Jonhson, Win and Herng, Tun Seng and Xu, Xi and Liu, Xiaojing and Pan, Liang-ming and He, Hui and Ding, Jun
Title High Temperature Co-firing of 3D-Printed Al-ZnO/Al2O3 Multi-Material Two-Phase Flow Sensor [Abstract]
Year 2021
Journal/Proceedings Journal of Materiomics
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Abstract
Sensors are crucial in the understanding of machines working under high temperatures and high-pressure conditions. Current devices utilize polymeric materials as electrical insulators which pose a challenge in the device’s lifespan. Ceramics, on the other hand, is robust and able to withstand high temperature and pressure. For such applications, a co-fired ceramic device which can provide both electrical conductivity and insulation is beneficial and acts as a superior candidate for sensor devices. In this paper, we propose a novel fabrication technique of complex multi-ceramics structures via 3D printing. This fabrication methodology increases both the geometrical complexity and the device’s shape precision. Structural ceramics (alumina) was employed as the electrical insulator whilst providing mechanical rigidity while a functional ceramic (alumina-doped zinc oxide) was employed as the electrically conductive material. The addition of sintering additives, tailoring the printing pastes’ solid loadings and heat treatment profile resolves multi-materials printing challenges such as shrinkage disparity and densification matching. Through high-temperature co-firing of ceramics (HTCC) technology, dense high quality functional multi-ceramics structures are achieved. The proposed fabrication methodology paves the way for multi-ceramics sensors to be utilized in high temperature and pressure systems in the near future.
AUTHOR Tan, Edgar Y. S. and Suntornnond, Ratima and Yeong, Wai Yee
Title High-Resolution Novel Indirect Bioprinting of Low-Viscosity Cell-Laden Hydrogels via Model-Support Bioink Interaction [Abstract]
Year 2021
Journal/Proceedings 3D Printing and Additive Manufacturing
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Abstract
Abstract Bioprinting of unmodified soft extracellular matrix into complex 3D structures has remained challenging to fabricate. Herein, we established a novel process for the printing of low-viscosity hydrogel by using a unique support technique to retain the structural integrity of the support structure. We demonstrated that this process of printing could be used for different types of hydrogel, ranging from fast crosslinking gelatin methacrylate to slow crosslinking collagen type I. In addition, we evaluated the biocompatibility of the process by observing the effects of the cytotoxicity of L929 and the functionality of the human umbilical vein endothelium primary cells after printing. The results show that the bioprinted construct provided excellent biocompatibility as well as supported cell growth and differentiation. Thus, this is a novel technique that can be potentially used to enhance the resolution of the extrusion-based bioprinter.
AUTHOR King, William E. and Bowlin, Gary L.
Title Near-Field Electrospinning and Melt Electrowriting of Biomedical Polymers—Progress and Limitations [Abstract]
Year 2021
Journal/Proceedings Polymers
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Abstract
Near-field electrospinning (NFES) and melt electrowriting (MEW) are the process of extruding a fiber due to the force exerted by an electric field and collecting the fiber before bending instabilities occur. When paired with precise relative motion between the polymer source and the collector, a fiber can be directly written as dictated by preprogrammed geometry. As a result, this precise fiber control results in another dimension of scaffold tailorability for biomedical applications. In this review, biomedically relevant polymers that to date have manufactured fibers by NFES/MEW are explored and the present limitations in direct fiber writing of standardization in published setup details, fiber write throughput, and increased ease in the creation of complex scaffold geometries are discussed.
AUTHOR Salgado-Pizarro, Rebeca and Padilla, Jose Antonio and Xuriguera, Elena and Barreneche, Camila and Fernández, Ana Inés
Title Novel Shape-Stabilized Phase Change Material with Cascade Character: Synthesis, Performance and Shaping Evaluation [Abstract]
Year 2021
Journal/Proceedings Energies
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Abstract
Thermal Energy Storage (TES) materials, such as Phase Change Materials (PCMs) are proven to enhance the energy efficiency in many fields, such as automotive and building sectors, which correspond to the most energy intensive ones. Shape-stabilized PCM and cascade PCM are procedures to overcome the most important barriers when PCMs are applied since PCMs need to be encapsulated for their technical use: the leakage of the liquid phase, corrosion, low heat transfer and narrow temperature of application. In the present study, a novel shape stabilized PCM with cascade performance (cascade shape stabilized phase change material, CSS-PCM) is synthesized via dissolution, which allows up to 60 wt.% of a paraffin-PCM in the final composition. The novel CSS-PCM is based on a biopolymer, the polycaprolactone (PCL), a low melting temperature polyester as polymeric matrix and RT27 and Micronal DS 5040 acting as PCM. To evaluate the performance of the new TES materials developed, several techniques have been used: Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), and Fourier-Transformed Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy were used to evaluate the thermophysical properties and the chemical properties of the different formulations. The CSS-PCM show an increment of storage capacity by increasing the PCM content, and the thermal reliability was also tested: some of the CSS-PCM formulations were stable for up to 500 thermal cycles. Finally, as a potential application of the new polymeric-based PCM 3D, a printing attempt was performed in order to analyze the viability of the formulations to be used as 3D printing material as a first proof of concept.
AUTHOR Plou, Javier and Charconnet, Mathias and García, Isabel and Calvo, Javier and Liz-Marzán, Luis M.
Title Preventing Memory Effects in Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Substrates by Polymer Coating and Laser-Activated Deprotection [Abstract]
Year 2021
Journal/Proceedings ACS Nano
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DOI/URL DOI
Abstract
The development of continuous monitoring systems requires in situ sensors that are capable of screening multiple chemical species and providing real-time information. Such in situ measurements, in which the sample is analyzed at the point of interest, are hindered by underlying problems derived from the recording of successive measurements within complex environments. In this context, surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy appears as a noninvasive technology with the ability of identifying low concentrations of chemical species as well as resolving dynamic processes under different conditions. To this aim, the technique requires the use of a plasmonic substrate, typically made of nanostructured metals such as gold or silver, to enhance the Raman signal of adsorbed molecules (the analyte). However, a common source of uncertainty in real-time SERS measurements originates from the irreversible adsorption of (analyte) molecules onto the plasmonic substrate, which may interfere in subsequent measurements. This so-called “SERS memory effect” leads to measurements that do not accurately reflect varying conditions of the sample over time. We introduce herein the design of plasmonic substrates involving a nonpermeable poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) thin layer on top of the plasmonic nanostructure, toward controlling the adsorption of molecules at different times. The polymeric layer can be locally degraded by irradiation with the same laser used for SERS measurements (albeit at a higher fluence), thereby creating a micrometer-sized window on the plasmonic substrate available to molecules present in solution at a selected measurement time. Using SERS substrates coated with such thermolabile polymer layers, we demonstrate the possibility of performing over 10,000 consecutive measurements per substrate as well as accurate continuous monitoring of analytes in microfluidic channels and biological systems. The development of continuous monitoring systems requires in situ sensors that are capable of screening multiple chemical species and providing real-time information. Such in situ measurements, in which the sample is analyzed at the point of interest, are hindered by underlying problems derived from the recording of successive measurements within complex environments. In this context, surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy appears as a noninvasive technology with the ability of identifying low concentrations of chemical species as well as resolving dynamic processes under different conditions. To this aim, the technique requires the use of a plasmonic substrate, typically made of nanostructured metals such as gold or silver, to enhance the Raman signal of adsorbed molecules (the analyte). However, a common source of uncertainty in real-time SERS measurements originates from the irreversible adsorption of (analyte) molecules onto the plasmonic substrate, which may interfere in subsequent measurements. This so-called “SERS memory effect” leads to measurements that do not accurately reflect varying conditions of the sample over time. We introduce herein the design of plasmonic substrates involving a nonpermeable poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) thin layer on top of the plasmonic nanostructure, toward controlling the adsorption of molecules at different times. The polymeric layer can be locally degraded by irradiation with the same laser used for SERS measurements (albeit at a higher fluence), thereby creating a micrometer-sized window on the plasmonic substrate available to molecules present in solution at a selected measurement time. Using SERS substrates coated with such thermolabile polymer layers, we demonstrate the possibility of performing over 10,000 consecutive measurements per substrate as well as accurate continuous monitoring of analytes in microfluidic channels and biological systems.
AUTHOR Lagatuz, M. and Vyas, R. J. and Predovic, M. and Lim, S. and Jacobs, N. and Martinho, M. and Valizadegan, H. and Kao, D. and Oza, N. and Theriot, C. A. and Zanello, S. B. and Taibbi, G. and Vizzeri, G. and Dupont, M. and Grant, M. B. and Lindner, D. J. and Reinecker, H.-C. and Pinhas, A. and Chui, T. Y. and Rosen, R. B. and Moldovan, N. and Vickerman, M. B. and Radhakrishnan, K. and Parsons-Wingerter, P.
Title Vascular Patterning as Integrative Readout of Complex Molecular and Physiological Signaling by VESsel GENeration Analysis [Abstract]
Year 2021
Journal/Proceedings J Vasc Res
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Abstract
The molecular signaling cascades that regulate angiogenesis and microvascular remodeling are fundamental to normal development, healthy physiology, and pathologies such as inflammation and cancer. Yet quantifying such complex, fractally branching vascular patterns remains difficult. We review application of NASA’s globally available, freely downloadable VESsel GENeration (VESGEN) Analysis software to numerous examples of 2D vascular trees, networks, and tree-network composites. Upon input of a binary vascular image, automated output includes informative vascular maps and quantification of parameters such as tortuosity, fractal dimension, vessel diameter, area, length, number, and branch point. Previous research has demonstrated that cytokines and therapeutics such as vascular endothelial growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor (fibroblast growth factor-2), transforming growth factor-beta-1, and steroid triamcinolone acetonide specify unique “fingerprint” or “biomarker” vascular patterns that integrate dominant signaling with physiological response. In vivo experimental examples described here include vascular response to keratinocyte growth factor, a novel vessel tortuosity factor; angiogenic inhibition in humanized tumor xenografts by the anti-angiogenesis drug leronlimab; intestinal vascular inflammation with probiotic protection by Saccharomyces boulardii, and a workflow programming of vascular architecture for 3D bioprinting of regenerative tissues from 2D images. Microvascular remodeling in the human retina is described for astronaut risks in microgravity, vessel tortuosity in diabetic retinopathy, and venous occlusive disease.
AUTHOR Lin, Che-Wei and Su, Yu-Feng and Lee, Chih-Yun and Kang, Lin and Wang, Yan-Hsiung and Lin, Sung-Yen and Wang, Chih-Kuang
Title 3D printed bioceramics fabricated using negative thermoresponsive hydrogels and silicone oil sealing to promote bone formation in calvarial defects [Abstract]
Year 2020
Journal/Proceedings Ceramics International
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Abstract
The purpose of the present work was to investigate the potential for application and the effectiveness of osteoconductive scaffolds with bicontinuous phases of 3D printed bioceramics (3DP-BCs) based on reverse negative thermoresponsive hydrogels (poly[(N-isopropylacrylamide)-co-(methacrylic acid)]; p(NiPAAm-MAA)). 3DP-BCs have bioceramic objects and microchannel pores when created using robotic deposition additive manufacturing. We evaluated the benefits of silicone oil sealing on the 3DP-BC green body during the sintering process in terms of densification and structural stability. The shrinkage, density, porosity, element composition, phase structure and microstructural analyses and compression strength measurements of sintered 3DP-BC objects are presented and discussed in this study. In addition, the results of cell viability assays and bone healing analyses of the calvarial bone defects in a rabbit model were used to evaluate 3DP-BC performance. The main results indicated that these 3DP-BC scaffolds have optimal continuous pores and adequate compressive strength, which can enable the protection of calvarial defects and provide an environment for cell growth. Therefore, 3DP-BC scaffolds have better new bone regeneration efficiency in rabbit calvarial bone defect models than empty scaffolds and mold-forming bioceramic scaffolds (MF-BCs).
AUTHOR Rupp, Harald and Binder, Wolfgang H.
Title 3D Printing of Core–Shell Capsule Composites for Post-Reactive and Damage Sensing Applications [Abstract]
Year 2020
Journal/Proceedings Advanced Materials Technologies
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Abstract
Abstract 3D printing of multicomponent materials as an advantageous method over traditional mold casting methods is demonstrated, developing small core–shell capsule composites fabricated by a two-step 3D printing process. Using a two-print-head system (fused deposition modeling extruder and a liquid inkjet print head), micro-sized capsules are manufactured in sizes ranging from 100 to 800 µm. The thermoplastic polymer poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) is chosen as matrix/shell material due to its optimal interaction with the embedded hydrophobic liquids. First, the core–shell capsules are printed with model liquids and pure PCL to optimize the printing parameters and to ensure fully enclosed capsules inside the polymer. As a proof of concept, novel “click” reaction systems, used in self-healing and stress-detection applications, are manufactured in which PCL composites with nano- and micro-fillers are combined with reactive, encapsulated liquids. The so generated 3D printed core–shell capsule composite can be used for post-printing reactions and damage sensing when combined with a fluorogenic dye.
AUTHOR Jung, Harry and Lee, Ji Seung and Lee, Jun Ho and Park, Ki Joon and Lee, Jae Jun and Park, Hae Sang
Title A Feasibility Study for 3D-printed Poly(methyl methacrylate)-resin Tracheostomy Tube Using a Hamster Cheek Pouch Model
Year 2020
Journal/Proceedings In Vivo
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AUTHOR Wang, Zehao and Hui, Aiping and Zhao, Hongbin and Ye, Xiaohan and Zhang, Chao and Wang, Aiqin and Zhang, Changqing
Title A Novel 3D-bioprinted Porous Nano Attapulgite Scaffolds with Good Performance for Bone Regeneration [Abstract]
Year 2020
Journal/Proceedings International Journal of Nanomedicine
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Abstract
BACKGROUND: Natural clay nanomaterials are an emerging class of biomaterial with great potential for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications, most notably for osteogenesis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Herein, for the first time, novel tissue engineering scaffolds were prepared by 3D bioprinter using nontoxic and bioactive natural attapulgite (ATP) nanorods as starting materials, with polyvinyl alcohol as binder, and then sintered to obtain final scaffolds. The microscopic morphology and structure of ATP particles and scaffolds were observed by transmission electron microscope and scanning electron microscope. In vitro biocompatibility and osteogenesis with osteogenic precursor cell (hBMSCs) were assayed using MTT method, Live/Dead cell staining, alizarin red staining and RT-PCR. In vivo bone regeneration was evaluated with micro-CT and histology analysis in rat cranium defect model. RESULTS: We successfully printed a novel porous nano-ATP scaffold designed with inner channels with a dimension of 500 µm and wall structures with a thickness of 330 µm. The porosity of current 3D-printed scaffolds ranges from 75% to 82% and the longitudinal compressive strength was up to 4.32±0.52 MPa. We found firstly that nano-ATP scaffolds with excellent biocompatibility for hBMSCscould upregulate the expression of osteogenesis-related genes bmp2 and runx2 and calcium deposits in vitro. Interestingly, micro-CT and histology analysis revealed abundant newly formed bone was observed along the defect margin, even above and within the 3D bioprinted porous ATP scaffolds in a rat cranial defect model. Furthermore, histology analysis demonstrated that bone was formed directly following a process similar to membranous ossification without any intermediate cartilage formation and that many newly formed blood vessels are within the pores of 3D-printed scaffolds at four and eight weeks. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that the 3D-printed porous nano-ATP scaffolds are promising candidates for bone tissue engineering by osteogenesis and angiogenesis.
AUTHOR Lee, J. M. and Sing, S. L. and Yeong, W. Y.
Title Bioprinting of Multimaterials with Computer-aided Design/Computer -aided Manufacturing [Abstract]
Year 2020
Journal/Proceedings International Journal of Bioprinting; Vol 6, No 1 (2020)
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Abstract
Multimaterials deposition, a distinct advantage in bioprinting, overcomes material’s limitation in hydrogel-based bioprinting. Multimaterials are deposited in a build/support configuration to improve the structural integrity of three-dimensional bioprinted construct. A combination of rapid cross-linking hydrogel has been chosen for the build/support setup. The bioprinted construct was further chemically cross-linked to ensure a stable construct after print. This paper also proposes a file segmentation and preparation technique to be used in bioprinting for printing freeform structures.
AUTHOR Diloksumpan, Paweena and de Ruijter, Myl{`{e}}ne and Castilho, Miguel and Gbureck, Uwe and Vermonden, Tina and van Weeren, P. Ren{'{e}} and Malda, Jos and Levato, Riccardo
Title Combining multi-scale 3D printing technologies to engineer reinforced hydrogel-ceramic interfaces [Abstract]
Year 2020
Journal/Proceedings Biofabrication
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Abstract
Multi-material 3D printing technologies that resolve features at different lengths down to the microscale open new avenues for regenerative medicine, particularly in the engineering of tissue interfaces. Herein, extrusion printing of a bone-biomimetic ceramic ink and melt electrowriting (MEW) of spatially organized polymeric microfibres are integrated for the biofabrication of an osteochondral plug, with a mechanically reinforced bone-to-cartilage interface. A printable physiological temperature-setting bioceramic, based on α-tricalcium phosphate, nanohydroxyapatite and a custom-synthesized biodegradable and crosslinkable poloxamer, was developed as bone support. The mild setting reaction of the bone ink enabled us to print directly within melt electrowritten polycaprolactone meshes, preserving their micro-architecture. Ceramic-integrated MEW meshes protruded into the cartilage region of the composite plug, and were embedded with mechanically soft gelatin-based hydrogels, laden with articular cartilage chondroprogenitor cells. Such interlocking design enhanced the hydrogel-to-ceramic adhesion strength >6.5-fold, compared with non-interlocking fibre architectures, enabling structural stability during handling and surgical implantation in osteochondral defects ex vivo. Furthermore, the MEW meshes endowed the chondral compartment with compressive properties approaching those of native cartilage (20-fold reinforcement versus pristine hydrogel). The osteal and chondral compartment supported osteogenesis and cartilage matrix deposition in vitro, and the neo-synthesized cartilage matrix further contributed to the mechanical reinforcement at the ceramic-hydrogel interface. This multi-material, multi-scale 3D printing approach provides a promising strategy for engineering advanced composite constructs for the regeneration of musculoskeletal and connective tissue interfaces.
AUTHOR Tan, Wen See and Juhari, Muhammad Aidil Bin and Shi, Qian and Chen, Shengyang and Campolo, Domenico and Song, Juha
Title Development of a new additive manufacturing platform for direct freeform 3D printing of intrinsically curved flexible membranes [Abstract]
Year 2020
Journal/Proceedings Additive Manufacturing
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Abstract
The wearable technology market has been expanding from wearable medical devices for non-invasive continuous monitoring of patient vital signs to wearable devices for tracking fitness activities that any person can access. Regardless of their form or function, desirable characteristics of wearable devices are the ability to be flexible, conformal, and easily attachable to the human body. However, as the human body is intrinsically curved and irregular, flat devices often have poor interfacial adhesion with the human body. This often leads to interfacial delamination and eventual detachment of the device. Therefore, a new additive manufacturing (AM) platform, a direct freeform 3D printing process (DF3DP), is proposed to allow direct construction of intrinsically curved 3D surfaces during the material deposition phase without the need for any pre-shaped supporting molds or templates. This 3D freeform printing process involves a supporting matrix made up of calcium alginate microgels, printing material made from silicone ink, and freeform printing paths derived from customized G-codes that conform exactly to the scanned human surface profile. Curved meshes mimicking the human elbow were used as a demonstration. A static contact stability test showed that the printed 3D silicone mesh was highly conformal to the model elbow surface as compared to a 2D flat mesh. A dynamic contact stability test was also conducted by subjecting both meshes to 100 cycles of mechanical flexion and extension, proving that intrinsically curved surfaces can provide better contact stability for complex human body surfaces undergoing motion than can flat surfaces. These results have proven that intrinsically curved membranes or structures fabricated by DF3DP can reduce the interfacial shear stress and occurrence of cracks and delamination while maintaining structural integrity and stability during use without compromising the comfort of the users. Our approach can resolve interfacial issues in flexible substrates and has great potential for epidermal devices or soft robotics via its long-term sustainable performance.
AUTHOR Zhang, Hua and Cong, Yang and Osi, Amarachi Rosemary and Zhou, Yang and Huang, Fangcheng and Zaccaria, Remo P. and Chen, Jing and Wang, Rong and Fu, Jun
Title Direct 3D Printed Biomimetic Scaffolds Based on Hydrogel Microparticles for Cell Spheroid Growth [Abstract]
Year 2020
Journal/Proceedings Advanced Functional Materials
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Abstract
Abstract Biocompatible hydrogel inks with shear-thinning, appropriate yield strength, and fast self-healing are desired for 3D bioprinting. However, the lack of ideal 3D bioprinting inks with outstanding printability and high structural fidelity, as well as cell-compatibility, has hindered the progress of extrusion-based 3D bioprinting for tissue engineering. In this study, novel self-healable pre-cross-linked hydrogel microparticles (pcHμPs) of chitosan methacrylate (CHMA) and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) hybrid hydrogels are developed and used as bioinks for extrusion-based 3D printing of scaffolds with high fidelity and biocompatibility. The pcHμPs display excellent shear thinning when injected through a syringe and subsequently self-heal into gels as shear forces are removed. Numerical simulations indicate that the pcHμPs experience a plug flow in the nozzle with minimal disturbance, which favors a steady and continuous printing. Moreover, the pcHμPs show a self-supportive yield strength (540 Pa), which is critical for the fidelity of printed constructs. A series of biomimetic constructs with very high aspect ratio and delicate fine structures are directly printed by using the pcHμP ink. The 3D printed scaffolds support the growth of bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells and formation of cell spheroids, which are most important for tissue engineering.
AUTHOR Lee, Jia Min and Yeong, Wai Yee
Title Engineering macroscale cell alignment through coordinated toolpath design using support-assisted 3D bioprinting [Abstract]
Year 2020
Journal/Proceedings Journal of The Royal Society Interface
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DOI/URL DOI
Abstract
Aligned cells provide direction-dependent mechanical properties that influence biological and mechanical function in native tissues. Alignment techniques such as casting and uniaxial stretching cannot fully replicate the complex fibre orientation of native tissue such as the heart. In this study, bioprinting is used to direct the orientation of cell alignment. A 0°–90° grid structure was printed to assess the robustness of the support-assisted bioprinting technique. The variation in the angles of the grid pattern is designed to mimic the differences in fibril orientation of native tissues, where angles of cell alignment vary across the different layers. Through bioprinting of a cell–hydrogel mixture, C2C12 cells displayed directed alignment along the longitudinal axis of printed struts. Cell alignment is induced through firstly establishing structurally stable constructs (i.e. distinct 0°–90° structures) and secondly, allowing cells to dynamically remodel the bioprinted construct. Herein reports a method of inducing a macroscale level of controlled cell alignment with angle variation. This was not achievable both in terms of methods (i.e. conventional alignment techniques such as stretching and electrical stimulation) and magnitude (i.e. hydrogel features with less than 100 µm features).
AUTHOR Abu Awwad, Hosam Al-Deen M. and Thiagarajan, Lalitha and Kanczler, Janos M. and Amer, Mahetab H. and Bruce, Gordon and Lanham, Stuart and Rumney, Robin M. H. and Oreffo, Richard O. C. and Dixon, James E.
Title Genetically-programmed, mesenchymal stromal cell-laden & mechanically strong 3D bioprinted scaffolds for bone repair [Abstract]
Year 2020
Journal/Proceedings Journal of Controlled Release
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Abstract
Additive manufacturing processes used to create regenerative bone tissue engineered implants are not biocompatible, thereby restricting direct use with stem cells and usually require cell seeding post-fabrication. Combined delivery of stem cells with the controlled release of osteogenic factors, within a mechanically-strong biomaterial combined during manufacturing would replace injectable defect fillers (cements) and allow personalized implants to be rapidly prototyped by 3D bioprinting. Through the use of direct genetic programming via the sustained release of an exogenously delivered transcription factor RUNX2 (delivered as recombinant GET-RUNX2 protein) encapsulated in PLGA microparticles (MPs), we demonstrate that human mesenchymal stromal (stem) cells (hMSCs) can be directly fabricated into a thermo-sintered 3D bioprintable material and achieve effective osteogenic differentiation. Importantly we observed osteogenic programming of gene expression by released GET-RUNX2 (8.2-, 3.3- and 3.9-fold increases in OSX, RUNX2 and OPN expression, respectively) and calcification (von Kossa staining) in our scaffolds. The developed biodegradable PLGA/PEG paste formulation augments high-density bone development in a defect model (~2.4-fold increase in high density bone volume) and can be used to rapidly prototype clinically-sized hMSC-laden implants within minutes using mild, cytocompatible extrusion bioprinting. The ability to create mechanically strong 'cancellous bone-like’ printable implants for tissue repair that contain stem cells and controlled-release of programming factors is innovative, and will facilitate the development of novel localized delivery approaches to direct cellular behaviour for many regenerative medicine applications including those for personalized bone repair.
AUTHOR Eltaher, Hoda M. and Abukunna, Fatima E. and Ruiz-Cantu, Laura and Stone, Zack and Yang, Jing and Dixon, James E.
Title Human-scale tissues with patterned vascular networks by additive manufacturing of sacrificial sugar-protein composites [Abstract]
Year 2020
Journal/Proceedings Acta Biomaterialia
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Abstract
Combating necrosis, by supplying nutrients and removing waste, presents the major challenge for engineering large three-dimensional (3D) tissues. Previous elegant work used 3D printing with carbohydrate glass as a cytocompatible sacrificial template to create complex engineered tissues with vascular networks (Miller et al. 2012, Nature Materials). The fragile nature of this material compounded with the technical complexity needed to create high-resolution structures led us to create a flexible sugar-protein composite, termed Gelatin-sucrose matrix (GSM), to achieve a more robust and applicable material. Here we developed a low-range (25–37˚C) temperature sensitive formulation that can be moulded with micron-resolution features or cast during 3D printing to produce complex flexible filament networks forming sacrificial vessels. Using the temperature-sensitivity, we could control filament degeneration meaning GSM can be used with a variety of matrices and crosslinking strategies. Furthermore by incorporation of biocompatible crosslinkers into GSM directly, we could create thin endothelialized vessel walls and generate patterned tissues containing multiple matrices and cell-types. We also demonstrated that perfused vascular channels sustain metabolic function of a variety of cell-types including primary human cells. Importantly, we were able to construct vascularized human noses which otherwise would have been necrotic. Our material can now be exploited to create human-scale tissues for regenerative medicine applications. Statement of Significance Authentic and engineered tissues have demands for mass transport, exchanging nutrients and oxygen, and therefore require vascularization to retain viability and inhibit necrosis. Basic vascular networks must be included within engineered tissues intrinsically. Yet, this has been unachievable in physiologically-sized constructs with tissue-like cell densities until recently. Sacrificial moulding is an alternative in which networks of rigid lattices of filaments are created to prevent subsequent matrix ingress. Our study describes a biocompatible sacrificial sugar-protein formulation; GSM, made from mixtures of inexpensive and readily available bio-grade materials. GSM can be cast/moulded or bioprinted as sacrificial filaments that can rapidly dissolve in an aqueous environment temperature-sensitively. GSM material can be used to engineer viable and vascularized human-scale tissues for regenerative medicine applications.
AUTHOR Strauß, Svenja and Meutelet, Rafaela and Radosevic, Luka and Gretzinger, Sarah and Hubbuch, Jürgen
Title Image analysis as PAT-Tool for use in extrusion-based bioprinting [Abstract]
Year 2020
Journal/Proceedings Bioprinting
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Abstract
The technology of bioprinting is arousing a growing interest in biopharmaceutical research and industry. In order to accelerate process development in the field of bioprinting, image-based analysis methods are non-invasive, time- and cost-saving tools which are usable for printer characterization, bioink printability evaluation, and process optimization. Image processing can also be used for the study of reproducibility, since reliable production is important in the transition from research to industrial application, and more precisely to clinical studies. This study revolves around the establishment of an automated and image-based line analysis method for bioprinting applications which enables an easy comparison of 3D-printed lines. Diverse rheological properties of bioinks and the printing process affect the geometry of the resulting object. The line represents a simple geometry, where the influence of the rheological properties and printing parameters is directly apparent. Therefore, a method for line analysis was developed on the basis of image recognition. At first, the method is tested for several substances such as Nivea®, pure and colored Kolliphor solutions, and two commercially available hydrogel formulations which can be used as bioinks. These are Biogelx™-ink-RGD by Biogelx and Cellink® Bioink by Cellink. The examination of limitations showed that transparent materials such as Kolliphor-based solutions cannot be analyzed with the developed method whereas opaque materials such as Nivea® and both bioinks can be analyzed. In the course of process characterization, the method was used to investigate the shrinkage behavior for both bionks. With the help of the line analysis tool, a shrinkage behavior of both bioinks was demonstrated and thus, process time could be identified as a critical process parameter.
AUTHOR Rupp, Harald and Binder, Wolfgang H.
Title Multicomponent Stress-Sensing Composites Fabricated by 3D-Printing Methodologies [Abstract]
Year 2020
Journal/Proceedings Macromolecular Rapid Communications
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DOI/URL DOI
Abstract
Abstract The preparation and characterization of mechanoresponsive, 3D-printed composites are reported using a dual-printing setup for both, liquid dispensing and fused-deposition-modeling. The here reported stress-sensing materials are based on high- and low molecular weight mechanophores, including poly(ε-caprolactone)-, polyurethane-, and alkyl(C11)-based latent copper(I)bis(N-heterocyclic carbenes), which can be activated by compression to trigger a fluorogenic, copper(I)-catalyzed azide/alkyne “click”-reaction of an azide-functionalized fluorescent dye inside a bulk polymeric material. Focus is placed on the printability and postprinting activity of the latent mechanophores and the fluorogenic “click”-components. The multicomponent specimen containing both, azide and alkyne, are manufactured via a 3D-printer to place the components separately inside the specimen into void spaces generated during the FDM-process, which subsequently are filled with liquids using a separate liquid dispenser, located within the same 3D-printing system. The low-molecular weight mechanophores bearing the alkyl-C11 chains display the best printability, yielding a mechanochemical response after the 3D-printing process.
AUTHOR Plou, Javier and García, Isabel and Charconnet, Mathias and Astobiza, Ianire and García-Astrain, Clara and Matricardi, Cristiano and Mihi, Agustín and Carracedo, Arkaitz and Liz-Marzán, Luis M.
Title Multiplex SERS Detection of Metabolic Alterations in Tumor Extracellular Media [Abstract]
Year 2020
Journal/Proceedings Advanced Functional Materials
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Abstract
Abstract The composition and intercellular interactions of tumor cells in the tissues dictate the biochemical and metabolic properties of the tumor microenvironment. The metabolic rewiring has a profound impact on the properties of the microenvironment, to an extent that monitoring such perturbations could harbor diagnostic and therapeutic relevance. A growing interest in these phenomena has inspired the development of novel technologies with sufficient sensitivity and resolution to monitor metabolic alterations in the tumor microenvironment. In this context, surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) can be used for the label-free detection and imaging of diverse molecules of interest among extracellular components. Herein, the application of nanostructured plasmonic substrates comprising Au nanoparticles, self-assembled as ordered superlattices, to the precise SERS detection of selected tumor metabolites, is presented. The potential of this technology is first demonstrated through the analysis of kynurenine, a secreted immunomodulatory derivative of the tumor metabolism and the related molecules tryptophan and purine derivatives. SERS facilitates the unambiguous identification of trace metabolites and allows the multiplex detection of their characteristic fingerprints under different conditions. Finally, the effective plasmonic SERS substrate is combined with a hydrogel-based three-dimensional cancer model, which recreates the tumor microenvironment, for the real-time imaging of metabolite alterations and cytotoxic effects on tumor cells.
AUTHOR Diloksumpan, Paweena and Bolaños, Rafael Vindas and Cokelaere, Stefan and Pouran, Behdad and de Grauw, Janny and van Rijen, Mattie and van Weeren, René and Levato, Riccardo and Malda, Jos
Title Orthotopic Bone Regeneration within 3D Printed Bioceramic Scaffolds with Region-Dependent Porosity Gradients in an Equine Model [Abstract]
Year 2020
Journal/Proceedings Advanced Healthcare Materials
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Abstract
Abstract The clinical translation of three-dimensionally printed bioceramic scaffolds with tailored architectures holds great promise toward the regeneration of bone to heal critical-size defects. Herein, the long-term in vivo performance of printed hydrogel-ceramic composites made of methacrylated-oligocaprolactone-poloxamer and low-temperature self-setting calcium-phosphates is assessed in a large animal model. Scaffolds printed with different internal architectures, displaying either a designed porosity gradient or a constant pore distribution, are implanted in equine tuber coxae critical size defects. Bone ingrowth is challenged and facilitated only from one direction via encasing the bioceramic in a polycaprolactone shell. After 7 months, total new bone volume and scaffold degradation are significantly greater in structures with constant porosity. Interestingly, gradient scaffolds show lower extent of remodeling and regeneration even in areas having the same porosity as the constant scaffolds. Low regeneration in distal regions from the interface with native bone impairs ossification in proximal regions of the construct, suggesting that anisotropic architectures modulate the cross-talk between distant cells within critical-size defects. The study provides key information on how engineered architectural patterns impact osteoregeneration in vivo, and also indicates the equine tuber coxae as promising orthotopic model for studying materials stimulating bone formation.
AUTHOR Athanasiadis, Markos and Afanasenkau, Dzmitry and Derks, Wouter and Tondera, Christoph and Murganti, Francesca and Busskamp, Volker and Bergmann, Olaf and Minev, Ivan R.
Title Printed elastic membranes for multimodal pacing and recording of human stem-cell-derived cardiomyocytes [Abstract]
Year 2020
Journal/Proceedings npj Flexible Electronics
Reftype Athanasiadis2020
DOI/URL DOI
Abstract
Bioelectronic interfaces employing arrays of sensors and bioactuators are promising tools for the study, repair and engineering of cardiac tissues. They are typically constructed from rigid and brittle materials processed in a cleanroom environment. An outstanding technological challenge is the integration of soft materials enabling a closer match to the mechanical properties of biological cells and tissues. Here we present an algorithm for direct writing of elastic membranes with embedded electrodes, optical waveguides and microfluidics using a commercial 3D printing system and a palette of silicone elastomers. As proof of principle, we demonstrate interfacing of cardiomyocytes derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs), which are engineered to express Channelrhodopsin-2. We demonstrate electrical recording of cardiomyocyte field potentials and their concomitant modulation by optical and pharmacological stimulation delivered via the membrane. Our work contributes a simple prototyping strategy with potential applications in organ-on-chip or implantable systems that are multi-modal and mechanically soft.
AUTHOR Tan, Wen See and Shi, Qian and Chen, Shengyang and Bin Juhari, Muhammad Aidil and Song, Juha
Title Recyclable and biocompatible microgel-based supporting system for positive 3D freeform printing of silicone rubber [Abstract]
Year 2020
Journal/Proceedings Biomedical Engineering Letters
Reftype Tan2020
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