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AUTHOR Nothdurfter, Daniel and Ploner, Christian and Coraça-Huber, Débora C. and Wilflingseder, Doris and Müller, Thomas and Hermann, Martin and Hagenbuchner, Judith and Ausserlechner, Michael J.
Title 3D bioprinted, vascularized neuroblastoma tumor environment in fluidic chip devices for precision medicine drug testing [Abstract]
Year 2022
Journal/Proceedings Biofabrication
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Abstract
Neuroblastoma is an extracranial solid tumor which develops in early childhood and still has a poor prognosis. One strategy to increase cure rates is the identification of patient-specific drug responses in tissue models that mimic the interaction between patient cancer cells and tumor environment. We therefore developed a perfused and micro-vascularized tumor-environment model that is directly bioprinted into custom-manufactured fluidic chips. A gelatin-methacrylate/fibrin-based matrix containing multiple cell types mimics the tumor-microenvironment that promotes spontaneous micro-vessel formation by embedded endothelial cells. We demonstrate that both, adipocyte- and iPSC-derived mesenchymal stem cells can guide this process. Bioprinted channels are coated with endothelial cells post printing to form a dense vessel - tissue barrier. The tissue model thereby mimics structure and function of human soft tissue with endothelial cell-coated larger vessels for perfusion and micro-vessel networks within the hydrogel-matrix. Patient-derived neuroblastoma spheroids are added to the matrix during the printing process and grown for more than two weeks. We demonstrate that micro-vessels are attracted by and grow into tumor spheroids and that neuroblastoma cells invade the tumor-environment as soon as the spheroids disrupt. In summary, we describe the first bioprinted, micro-vascularized neuroblastoma – tumor-environment model directly printed into fluidic chips and a novel medium-throughput biofabrication platform suitable for studying tumor angiogenesis and metastasis in precision medicine approaches in future.
AUTHOR D'Agostino, Stefania and Rimann, Markus and Gamba, Piergiorgio and Perilongo, Giorgio and Pozzobon, Michela and Raghunath, Michael
Title Macromolecular crowding tuned extracellular matrix deposition in a bioprinted human rhabdomyosarcoma model [Abstract]
Year 2022
Journal/Proceedings Bioprinting
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The role of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in tumor recurrence and metastasis has been gaining attention. Indeed, not only cellular, but also structural proteins influence migratory and invasive capacity of tumor cells, including growth and resistance to drugs. Therefore, new in vitro tumor models that entail improved ECM formation and deposition are needed. Here, we are developed three-dimensional (3D) models of pediatric soft tissue sarcoma (Rhabdomyosarcoma [RMS]) with the two major subgroups, the embryonal (ERMS) and the alveolar (ARMS) form. We applied macromolecular crowding (MMC) technology to monolayer cultures, spheroids, and 3D bioprinted constructs. In all culture models, exposure to MMC significantly increased ECM deposition. Interestingly, bioprinted constructs showed a collagen and fibronectin matrix architecture that was comparable to that of tumor xenografts. Furthermore, the bioprinted model not only showed tumor cell growth inside the structure but also displayed cell clusters leaving the edges of the bioprinted construct, probably emulating a metastatic mechanism. ARMS and ERMS cells reacted differently in the bioprinted structure. Indeed, the characteristic metastatic behavior was much more pronounced in the more aggressive ARMS subtype. This promising approach opens new avenues for studying RMS microenvironment and creating a platform for cancer drug testing including the native tumor ECM.
AUTHOR Monferrer, Ezequiel and Martín-Vañó, Susana and Carretero, Aitor and García-Lizarribar, Andrea and Burgos-Panadero, Rebeca and Navarro, Samuel and Samitier, Josep and Noguera, Rosa
Title A three-dimensional bioprinted model to evaluate the effect of stiffness on neuroblastoma cell cluster dynamics and behavior [Abstract]
Year 2020
Journal/Proceedings Scientific Reports
Reftype Monferrer2020
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Abstract
Three-dimensional (3D) bioprinted culture systems allow to accurately control microenvironment components and analyze their effects at cellular and tissue levels. The main objective of this study was to identify, quantify and localize the effects of physical-chemical communication signals between tumor cells and the surrounding biomaterial stiffness over time, defining how aggressiveness increases in SK-N-BE(2) neuroblastoma (NB) cell line. Biomimetic hydrogels with SK-N-BE(2) cells, methacrylated gelatin and increasing concentrations of methacrylated alginate (AlgMA 0%, 1% and 2%) were used. Young’s modulus was used to define the stiffness of bioprinted hydrogels and NB tumors. Stained sections of paraffin-embedded hydrogels were digitally quantified. Human NB and 1% AlgMA hydrogels presented similar Young´s modulus mean, and orthotopic NB mice tumors were equally similar to 0% and 1% AlgMA hydrogels. Porosity increased over time; cell cluster density decreased over time and with stiffness, and cell cluster occupancy generally increased with time and decreased with stiffness. In addition, cell proliferation, mRNA metabolism and antiapoptotic activity advanced over time and with stiffness. Together, this rheological, optical and digital data show the potential of the 3D in vitro cell model described herein to infer how intercellular space stiffness patterns drive the clinical behavior associated with NB patients.
AUTHOR Roopesh, Ramesh Pai and Muthusamy, Senthilkumar and Velayudhan, Shiny and Sabareeswaran, Arumugham and Anil Kumar, Pallickaveedu RajanAsari
Title High-throughput production of liver parenchymal microtissues and enrichment of organ-specific functions in gelatin methacrylamide microenvironment [Abstract]
Year 2022
Journal/Proceedings Biotechnology and Bioengineering
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Abstract Liver parenchymal microtissues (LPMTs) are three-dimensional (3D) aggregates of hepatocytes that recapitulate in vivo-like cellular assembly. They are considered as a valuable model to study drug metabolism, disease biology, and serve as ideal building blocks for liver tissue engineering. However, their integration into the mainstream drug screening process has been hindered due to the lack of simple, rapid techniques to produce a large number of uniform microtissues and preserve their structural–functional integrity over the long term. Here, we present a high-throughput methodology to produce LPMTs in a novel, economic, and reusable Hanging-drop Culture Chamber (HdCC). A drop-on-demand bioprinting approach was optimized to generate droplets of HepG2 cell suspension on a polyethylene terephthalate substrate. The substrates carrying droplets were placed inside a novel HdCC and incubated to obtain 1600 LPMTs having a size of 200–300 μm. Tissue size, cell viability, cellular arrangement and polarity, and insulin-mediated glucose uptake by LPMTs were analyzed. The microtissues were viable and exhibited an active response to insulin stimulation. Cells within the microtissue reorganized to form hepatic plate-like structures and expressed apical (Multidrug Resistance Protein 2 [MRP2]) and epithelial (Zonula Occludens 1 [ZO1]) markers. Further to maintain the structural integrity and enhance the functional capabilities, LPMTs were sandwiched within gelatin methacrylamide (GelMA) hydrogel and the liver-specific functions were monitored for 2 weeks. The results showed that the 3D structure of LPMTs in GelMA sandwich was maintained while the albumin secretion, urea synthesis, and cytochrome P450 activity were enhanced compared with LPMTs in suspension. In conclusion, this study presents a novel culture chamber for mass production of microtissues and a method for enhancing organ-specific functions of LPMTs in vitro.
AUTHOR Dusserre, Nathalie and Stachowicz, Marie-Laure and Medina, Chantal and Henri, Baptiste and Fricain, Jean-Christophe and Paris, François and Oliveira, Hugo
Title Microvalve bioprinting as a biofabrication tool to decipher tumor and endothelial cell crosstalk: Application to a simplified glioblastoma model [Abstract]
Year 2021
Journal/Proceedings Bioprinting
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Bioprinting technologies are powerful new bioengineering tools that can spatially reproduce multiple microenvironmental cues in a highly controlled, tunable, and precise manner. In this study, microvalve bioprinting technology was successfully used to print in close proximity endothelial and tumor cells at higher concentrations than previously thought possible, while preserving their viability. We propose that the resulting multicellular models, bioprinted in a controlled extracellular matrix microenvironment, are well-suited to study endothelial and cancer cell crosstalk within a cancer niche. As proof of concept, microvalve bioprinting was applied to the bioengineering of a simplified glioblastoma model in which biological processes involved in tumor expansion, such as tumor cell invasion patterns, cell proliferation, and senescence could be easily visualized and quantified. In this model, U251 glioblastoma cells and primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) exhibited good printability and high viability after printing. U251 cells formed physiologically relevant clusters and invasion margins, while HUVECs generated vascular-like networks when primary fibroblasts were added to the model. An oxidative stress mimicking the one encountered within a tumor microenvironment during radiotherapy or genotoxic chemotherapy was shown to both diminish endothelial cells proliferation and to increase their senescence. Results also suggested that stressed glioblastoma cells may alter normal endothelial cell proliferation but not impact their senescence. This data demonstrates the potential of microvalve bioprinting to fabricate in vitro models that can help decipher endothelial and tumor cell crosstalk, within controlled and modulable microenvironments, and can then be used to address critical questions in the context of cancer recurrence.
AUTHOR Geevarghese, Rency and Somasekharan, Lakshmi T. and Bhatt, Anugya and Kasoju, Naresh and Nair, Renjith P.
Title Development and evaluation of a multicomponent bioink consisting of alginate, gelatin, diethylaminoethyl cellulose and collagen peptide for 3D bioprinting of tissue construct for drug screening application [Abstract]
Year 2022
Journal/Proceedings International Journal of Biological Macromolecules
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Three dimensional (3D) bioprinting technology has been making a progressive advancement in the field of tissue engineering to produce tissue constructs that mimic the shape, framework, and microenvironment of an organ. The technology has not only paved the way to organ development but has been widely studied for its application in drug and cosmetic testing using 3D bioprinted constructs. However, not much has been explored on the utilization of bioprinting technology for the development of tumor models to test anti-cancer drug efficacy. The conventional methodology involves a two dimensional (2D) monolayer model to test cellular drug response which has multiple limitations owing to its inability to mimic the natural tissue environment. The choice of bioink for 3D bioprinting is critical as cell morphology and proliferation depend greatly on the property of bioink. In this study, we developed a multicomponent bioink composed of alginate, diethylaminoethyl cellulose, gelatin, and collagen peptide to generate a 3D bioprinted construct. The bioink has been characterised and validated for its printability, shape fidelity and biocompatibility to be used for generating tumor models. Further, a bioprinted tumor model was developed using lung cancer cell line and the efficacy of 3D printed construct for drug screening application was established.
AUTHOR Chen, Shengyang and Shi, Qian and Jang, Taesik and Ibrahim, Mohammed Shahrudin Bin and Deng, Jingyu and Ferracci, Gaia and Tan, Wen See and Cho, Nam-Joon and Song, Juha
Title Engineering Natural Pollen Grains as Multifunctional 3D Printing Materials [Abstract]
Year 2021
Journal/Proceedings Advanced Functional Materials
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Abstract The development of multifunctional 3D printing materials from sustainable natural resources is a high priority in additive manufacturing. Using an eco-friendly method to transform hard pollen grains into stimulus-responsive microgel particles, we engineered a pollen-derived microgel suspension that can serve as a functional reinforcement for composite hydrogel inks and as a supporting matrix for versatile freeform 3D printing systems. The pollen microgel particles enabled the printing of composite inks and improved the mechanical and physiological stabilities of alginate and hyaluronic acid hydrogel scaffolds for 3D cell culture applications. Moreover, the particles endowed the inks with stimulus-responsive controlled release properties. The suitability of the pollen microgel suspension as a supporting matrix for freeform 3D printing of alginate and silicone rubber inks was demonstrated and optimized by tuning the rheological properties of the microgel. Compared with other classes of natural materials, pollen grains have several compelling features, including natural abundance, renewability, affordability, processing ease, monodispersity, and tunable rheological features, which make them attractive candidates to engineer advanced materials for 3D printing applications.
AUTHOR Paindelli, Claudia and Casarin, Stefano and Wang, Feng and Diaz-Gomez, Luis and Zhang, Jianhua and Mikos, Antonios G. and Logothetis, Christopher J. and Friedl, Peter and Dondossola, Eleonora
Title Enhancing Radium 223 treatment efficacy by anti-beta 1 integrin targeting [Abstract]
Year 2021
Journal/Proceedings Journal of Nuclear Medicine
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Radium 223 (223Ra) is an α-emitter approved for the treatment of bone metastatic prostate cancer (PCa), which exerts direct cytotoxicity towards PCa cells near the bone interface, whereas cells positioned in the core respond poorly, due to short α-particle penetrance. β1 integrin (β1I) interference has been shown to increase radiosensitivity and significantly enhance external beam radiation efficiency. We hypothesized that targeting β1I would improve 223Ra outcome. We tested the effect of combining 223Ra and anti-β1I antibody treatment in PC3 and C4-2B PCa cell models expressing high and low β1I levels, respectively. In vivo tumor growth was evaluated through bioluminescence. Cellular and molecular determinants of response were analyzed by ex vivo three-dimensional imaging of bone lesions, proteomic analysis and further confirmed by computational modeling and in vitro functional analysis in tissue-engineered bone mimetic systems. Interference with β1I combined with 223Ra reduced PC3 cell growth in bone and significantly improved overall mouse survival, while no change was achieved in C4-2B tumors. Anti-β1I treatment decreased PC3 tumor cell mitosis index and spatially expanded 223Ra lethal effects two-fold, in vivo and in silico. Regression was paralleled by decreased expression of radio-resistance mediators. Targeting β1I significantly improves 223Ra outcome and points towards combinatorial application in PCa tumors with high β1I expression.
AUTHOR Plou, Javier and Charconnet, Mathias and García, Isabel and Calvo, Javier and Liz-Marzán, Luis M.
Title Preventing Memory Effects in Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Substrates by Polymer Coating and Laser-Activated Deprotection [Abstract]
Year 2021
Journal/Proceedings ACS Nano
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The development of continuous monitoring systems requires in situ sensors that are capable of screening multiple chemical species and providing real-time information. Such in situ measurements, in which the sample is analyzed at the point of interest, are hindered by underlying problems derived from the recording of successive measurements within complex environments. In this context, surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy appears as a noninvasive technology with the ability of identifying low concentrations of chemical species as well as resolving dynamic processes under different conditions. To this aim, the technique requires the use of a plasmonic substrate, typically made of nanostructured metals such as gold or silver, to enhance the Raman signal of adsorbed molecules (the analyte). However, a common source of uncertainty in real-time SERS measurements originates from the irreversible adsorption of (analyte) molecules onto the plasmonic substrate, which may interfere in subsequent measurements. This so-called “SERS memory effect” leads to measurements that do not accurately reflect varying conditions of the sample over time. We introduce herein the design of plasmonic substrates involving a nonpermeable poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) thin layer on top of the plasmonic nanostructure, toward controlling the adsorption of molecules at different times. The polymeric layer can be locally degraded by irradiation with the same laser used for SERS measurements (albeit at a higher fluence), thereby creating a micrometer-sized window on the plasmonic substrate available to molecules present in solution at a selected measurement time. Using SERS substrates coated with such thermolabile polymer layers, we demonstrate the possibility of performing over 10,000 consecutive measurements per substrate as well as accurate continuous monitoring of analytes in microfluidic channels and biological systems. The development of continuous monitoring systems requires in situ sensors that are capable of screening multiple chemical species and providing real-time information. Such in situ measurements, in which the sample is analyzed at the point of interest, are hindered by underlying problems derived from the recording of successive measurements within complex environments. In this context, surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy appears as a noninvasive technology with the ability of identifying low concentrations of chemical species as well as resolving dynamic processes under different conditions. To this aim, the technique requires the use of a plasmonic substrate, typically made of nanostructured metals such as gold or silver, to enhance the Raman signal of adsorbed molecules (the analyte). However, a common source of uncertainty in real-time SERS measurements originates from the irreversible adsorption of (analyte) molecules onto the plasmonic substrate, which may interfere in subsequent measurements. This so-called “SERS memory effect” leads to measurements that do not accurately reflect varying conditions of the sample over time. We introduce herein the design of plasmonic substrates involving a nonpermeable poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) thin layer on top of the plasmonic nanostructure, toward controlling the adsorption of molecules at different times. The polymeric layer can be locally degraded by irradiation with the same laser used for SERS measurements (albeit at a higher fluence), thereby creating a micrometer-sized window on the plasmonic substrate available to molecules present in solution at a selected measurement time. Using SERS substrates coated with such thermolabile polymer layers, we demonstrate the possibility of performing over 10,000 consecutive measurements per substrate as well as accurate continuous monitoring of analytes in microfluidic channels and biological systems.
AUTHOR García-Astrain, Clara and Lenzi, Elisa and Jimenez de Aberasturi, Dorleta and Henriksen-Lacey, Malou and Binelli, Marco R. and Liz-Marzán, Luis M.
Title 3D-Printed Biocompatible Scaffolds with Built-In Nanoplasmonic Sensors [Abstract]
Year 2020
Journal/Proceedings Advanced Functional Materials
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Abstract 3D printing strategies have acquired great relevance toward the design of 3D scaffolds with precise macroporous structures, for supported mammalian cell growth. Despite advances in 3D model designs, there is still a shortage of detection tools to precisely monitor in situ cell behavior in 3D, thereby allowing a better understanding of the progression of diseases or to test the efficacy of drugs in a more realistic microenvironment. Even if the number of available inks has exponentially increased, they do not necessarily offer the required functionalities to be used as internal sensors. Herein the potential of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy for the detection of biorelevant analytes within a plasmonic hydrogel-based, 3D-printed scaffold is demonstrated. Such SERS-active scaffolds allow for the 3D detection of model molecules, such as 4-mercaptobenzoic acid. Flexibility in the choice of plasmonic nanoparticles is demonstrated through the use of gold nanoparticles with different morphologies, gold nanorods showing the best balance between SERS enhancement and scaffold transparency. Detection of the biomarker adenosine is also demonstrated as a proof-of-concept toward the use of these plasmonic scaffolds for SERS sensing of cell-secreted molecules over extended periods of time.
AUTHOR Huang, Yen-Lin and Liang, Ching-Yeu and Ritz, Danilo and Coelho, Ricardo and Septiadi, Dedy and Estermann, Manuela and Cumin, Cécile and Rimmer, Natalie and Schötzau, Andreas and Núñez López, Mónica and Fedier, André and Konantz, Martina and Vlajnic, Tatjana and Calabrese, Diego and Lengerke, Claudia and David, Leonor and Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara and Jacob, Francis and Heinzelmann-Schwarz, Viola
Title Collagen-rich omentum is a premetastatic niche for integrin α2-mediated peritoneal metastasis [Abstract]
Year 2020
Journal/Proceedings eLife
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Abstract
The extracellular matrix (ECM) plays critical roles in tumor progression and metastasis. However, the contribution of ECM proteins to early metastatic onset in the peritoneal cavity remains unexplored. Here, we suggest a new route of metastasis through the interaction of integrin alpha 2 (ITGA2) with collagens enriched in the tumor coinciding with poor outcome in patients with ovarian cancer. Using multiple gene-edited cell lines and patient-derived samples, we demonstrate that ITGA2 triggers cancer cell adhesion to collagen, promotes cell migration, anoikis resistance, mesothelial clearance, and peritoneal metastasis in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistically, phosphoproteomics identify an ITGA2-dependent phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway leading to enhanced oncogenic properties. Consequently, specific inhibition of ITGA2-mediated cancer cell-collagen interaction or targeting focal adhesion signaling may present an opportunity for therapeutic intervention of metastatic spread in ovarian cancer.
AUTHOR Song, Jie-Liang and Fu, Xin-Ye and Raza, Ali and Shen, Nai-An and Xue, Ya-Qi and Wang, Hua-Jie and Wang, Jin-Ye
Title Enhancement of mechanical strength of TCP-alginate based bioprinted constructs [Abstract]
Year 2020
Journal/Proceedings Journal of the Mechanical Behavior of Biomedical Materials
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To overcome the mechanical drawback of bioink, we proposed a supporter model to enhance the mechanical strength of bioprinted 3D constructs, in which a unit-assembly idea was involved. Based on Computed Tomography images of critical-sized rabbit bone defect, the 3D re-construction was accomplished by a sequenced process using Mimics 17.0, BioCAM and BioCAD software. 3D constructs were bioprinted using polycaprolactone (PCL) ink for the outer supporter under extrusion mode, and cell-laden tricalcium phosphate (TCP)/alginate bioink for the inner filler under air pressure dispensing mode. The relationship of viscosity of bioinks, 3D bioprinting pressure, TCP/alginate ratio and cell survival were investigated by the shear viscosities analysis, live/dead cell test and cell-counting kit 8 measurement. The viscosity of bioinks at 1.0 s−1-shear rate could be adjusted within the range of 1.75 ± 0.29 Pa·s to 155.65 ± 10.86 Pa·s by changing alginate concentration, corresponding to 10 kPa–130 kPa of printing pressure. This design with PCL supporter could significantly enhance the compressive strength and compressive modulus of standardized 3D mechanical testing specimens up to 2.15 ± 0.14 MPa to 2.58 ± 0.09 MPa, and 42.83 ± 4.75 MPa to 53.12 ± 1.19 MPa, respectively. Cells could maintain the high viability (over 80%) under the given printing pressure but cell viability declined with the increase of TCP content. Cell survival after experiencing 7 days of cell culture could be achieved when the ratio of TCP/alginate was 1 : 4. All data supported the feasibility of the supporter and unit-assembly model to enhance mechanical properties of bioprinted 3D constructs.
AUTHOR López-Carrasco, Amparo and Martín-Vañó, Susana and Burgos-Panadero, Rebeca and Monferrer, Ezequiel and Berbegall, Ana P. and Fernández-Blanco, Beatriz and Navarro, Samuel and Noguera, Rosa
Title Impact of extracellular matrix stiffness on genomic heterogeneity in MYCN-amplified neuroblastoma cell line [Abstract]
Year 2020
Journal/Proceedings Journal of Experimental & Clinical Cancer Research
Reftype López-Carrasco2020
DOI/URL DOI
Abstract
Increased tissue stiffness is a common feature of malignant solid tumors, often associated with metastasis and poor patient outcomes. Vitronectin, as an extracellular matrix anchorage glycoprotein related to a stiff matrix, is present in a particularly increased quantity and specific distribution in high-risk neuroblastoma. Furthermore, as cells can sense and transform the proprieties of the extracellular matrix into chemical signals through mechanotransduction, genotypic changes related to stiffness are possible.
AUTHOR Plou, Javier and García, Isabel and Charconnet, Mathias and Astobiza, Ianire and García-Astrain, Clara and Matricardi, Cristiano and Mihi, Agustín and Carracedo, Arkaitz and Liz-Marzán, Luis M.
Title Multiplex SERS Detection of Metabolic Alterations in Tumor Extracellular Media [Abstract]
Year 2020
Journal/Proceedings Advanced Functional Materials
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Abstract The composition and intercellular interactions of tumor cells in the tissues dictate the biochemical and metabolic properties of the tumor microenvironment. The metabolic rewiring has a profound impact on the properties of the microenvironment, to an extent that monitoring such perturbations could harbor diagnostic and therapeutic relevance. A growing interest in these phenomena has inspired the development of novel technologies with sufficient sensitivity and resolution to monitor metabolic alterations in the tumor microenvironment. In this context, surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) can be used for the label-free detection and imaging of diverse molecules of interest among extracellular components. Herein, the application of nanostructured plasmonic substrates comprising Au nanoparticles, self-assembled as ordered superlattices, to the precise SERS detection of selected tumor metabolites, is presented. The potential of this technology is first demonstrated through the analysis of kynurenine, a secreted immunomodulatory derivative of the tumor metabolism and the related molecules tryptophan and purine derivatives. SERS facilitates the unambiguous identification of trace metabolites and allows the multiplex detection of their characteristic fingerprints under different conditions. Finally, the effective plasmonic SERS substrate is combined with a hydrogel-based three-dimensional cancer model, which recreates the tumor microenvironment, for the real-time imaging of metabolite alterations and cytotoxic effects on tumor cells.
AUTHOR Hou, Yanhao and Wang, Weiguang and Bártolo, Paulo
Title Novel Poly(ɛ-caprolactone)/Graphene Scaffolds for Bone Cancer Treatment and Bone Regeneration [Abstract]
Year 2020
Journal/Proceedings 3D Printing and Additive Manufacturing
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Abstract
Scaffold-based bone tissue engineering is the most relevant approach for critical-sized bone defects. It is based on the use of three-dimensional substrates to provide the appropriate biomechanical environment for bone regeneration. Despite some successful results previously reported, scaffolds were never designed for disease treatment applications. This article proposes a novel dual-functional scaffold for cancer applications, comprising both treatment and regeneration functions. These functions are achieved by combining a biocompatible and biodegradable polymer and graphene. Results indicate that high concentrations of graphene enhance the mechanical properties of the scaffolds, also increasing the inhibition on cancer cell viability and proliferation.
AUTHOR Shi, Pujiang and Tan, Yong Sheng Edgar and Yeong, Wai Yee and Li, Hoi Yeung and Laude, Augustinus
Title A bilayer photoreceptor‐retinal tissue model with gradient cell density design: A study of microvalve‐based bioprinting [Abstract]
Year 2018
Journal/Proceedings Journal of Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine
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Abstract ARPE‐19 and Y79 cells were precisely and effectively delivered to form an in vitro retinal tissue model via 3D cell bioprinting technology. The samples were characterized by cell viability assay, haematoxylin and eosin and immunofluorescent staining, scanning electrical microscopy and confocal microscopy, and so forth. The bioprinted ARPE‐19 cells formed a high‐quality cell monolayer in 14 days. Manually seeded ARPE‐19 cells were poorly controlled during and after cell seeding, and they aggregated to form uneven cell layer. The Y79 cells were subsequently bioprinted on the ARPE‐19 cell monolayer to form 2 distinctive patterns. The microvalve‐based bioprinting is efficient and accurate to build the in vitro tissue models with the potential to provide similar pathological responses and mechanism to human diseases, to mimic the phenotypic endpoints that are comparable with clinical studies, and to provide a realistic prediction of clinical efficacy.
AUTHOR Hauser, Daniel and Estermann, Manuela and Milosevic, Ana and Steinmetz, Lukas and Vanhecke, Dimitri and Septiadi, Dedy and Drasler, Barbara and Petri-Fink, Alke and Ball, Vincent and Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara
Title Polydopamine/Transferrin Hybrid Nanoparticles for Targeted Cell-Killing [Abstract]
Year 2018
Journal/Proceedings Nanomaterials
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Polydopamine can form biocompatible particles that convert light into heat. Recently, a protocol has been optimized to synthesize polydopamine/protein hybrid nanoparticles that retain the biological function of proteins, and combine it with the stimuli-induced heat generation of polydopamine. We have utilized this novel system to form polydopamine particles, containing transferrin (PDA/Tf). Mouse melanoma cells, which strongly express the transferrin receptor, were exposed to PDA/Tf nanoparticles (NPs) and, subsequently, were irradiated with a UV laser. The cell death rate was monitored in real-time. When irradiated, the melanoma cells exposed to PDA/Tf NPs underwent apoptosis, faster than the control cells, pointing towards the ability of PDA/Tf to mediate UV-light-induced cell death. The system was also validated in an organotypic, 3D-printed tumor spheroid model, comprising mouse melanoma cells, and the exposure and subsequent irradiation with UV-light, yielded similar results to the 2D cell culture. The process of apoptosis was found to be targeted and mediated by the lysosomal membrane permeabilization. Therefore, the herein presented polydopamine/protein NPs constitute a versatile and stable system for cancer cell-targeting and photothermal apoptosis induction.
AUTHOR Kuzmenko, Volodymyr and Karabulut, Erdem and Pernevik, Elin and Enoksson, Peter and Gatenholm, Paul
Title Tailor-made conductive inks from cellulose nanofibrils for 3D printing of neural guidelines [Abstract]
Year 2018
Journal/Proceedings Carbohydrate Polymers
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Neural tissue engineering (TE), an innovative biomedical method of brain study, is very dependent on scaffolds that support cell development into a functional tissue. Recently, 3D patterned scaffolds for neural TE have shown significant positive effects on cells by a more realistic mimicking of actual neural tissue. In this work, we present a conductive nanocellulose-based ink for 3D printing of neural TE scaffolds. It is demonstrated that by using cellulose nanofibrils and carbon nanotubes as ink constituents, it is possible to print guidelines with a diameter below 1 mm and electrical conductivity of 3.8 × 10−1 S cm−1. The cell culture studies reveal that neural cells prefer to attach, proliferate, and differentiate on the 3D printed conductive guidelines. To our knowledge, this is the first research effort devoted to using cost-effective cellulosic 3D printed structures in neural TE, and we suppose that much more will arise in the near future.
AUTHOR D'Amora, Ugo and D'Este, Matteo and Eglin, David and Safari, Fatemeh and Sprecher, Christoph and Gloria, Antonio and De Santis, Roberto and Alini, Mauro and Ambrosio, Luigi
Title Collagen Density Gradient on 3D Printed Poly(ε-Caprolactone) Scaffolds for Interface Tissue Engineering
Year 2017
Journal/Proceedings Journal of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine
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