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You are researching: Carbon Nanotubes (CNT)
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AUTHOR e Silva, Edney P. and Huang, Boyang and Helaehil, Júlia V. and Nalesso, Paulo R. L. and Bagne, Leonardo and de Oliveira, Maraiara A. and Albiazetti, Gabriela C. C. and Aldalbahi, Ali and El-Newehy, Mohamed and Santamaria-Jr, Milton and Mendonça, Fernanda A. S. and Bártolo, Paulo and Caetano, Guilherme F.
Title In vivo study of conductive 3D printed PCL/MWCNTs scaffolds with electrical stimulation for bone tissue engineering [Abstract]
Year 2021
Journal/Proceedings Bio-Design and Manufacturing
Reftype e Silva2021
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Abstract
Critical bone defects are considered one of the major clinical challenges in reconstructive bone surgery. The combination of 3D printed conductive scaffolds and exogenous electrical stimulation (ES) is a potential favorable approach for bone tissue repair. In this study, 3D conductive scaffolds made with biocompatible and biodegradable polycaprolactone (PCL) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were produced using the extrusion-based additive manufacturing to treat large calvary bone defects in rats. Histology results show that the use of PCL/MWCNTs scaffolds and ES contributes to thicker and increased bone tissue formation within the bone defect. Angiogenesis and mineralization are also significantly promoted using high concentration of MWCNTs (3 wt%) and ES. Moreover, scaffolds favor the tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) positive cell formation, while the addition of MWCNTs seems to inhibit the osteoclastogenesis but present limited effects on the osteoclast functionalities (receptor activator of nuclear factor κβ ligand (RANKL) and osteoprotegerin (OPG) expressions). The use of ES promotes the osteoclastogenesis and RANKL expressions, showing a dominant effect in the bone remodeling process. These results indicate that the combination of 3D printed conductive PCL/MWCNTs scaffold and ES is a promising strategy to treat critical bone defects and provide a cue to establish an optimal protocol to use conductive scaffolds and ES for bone tissue engineering.
AUTHOR Huang, Boyang and Vyas, Cian and Byun, Jae Jong and El-Newehy, Mohamed and Huang, Zhucheng and Bártolo, Paulo
Title Aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes with nanohydroxyapatite in a 3D printed polycaprolactone scaffold stimulates osteogenic differentiation [Abstract]
Year 2020
Journal/Proceedings Materials Science and Engineering: C
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The development of highly biomimetic scaffolds in terms of composition and structures, to repair or replace damaged bone tissues, is particularly relevant for tissue engineering. This paper investigates a 3D printed porous scaffold containing aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and nano-hydroxyapatite (nHA), mimicking the natural bone tissue from the nanoscale to macroscale level. MWCNTs with similar dimensions as collagen fibres are coupled with nHA and mixed within a polycaprolactone (PCL) matrix to produce scaffolds using a screw-assisted extrusion-based additive manufacturing system. Scaffolds with different material compositions were extensively characterised from morphological, mechanical and biological points of views. Transmission electron microscopy and polarised Raman spectroscopy confirm the presence of aligned MWCNTs within the printed filaments. The PCL/HA/MWCNTs scaffold are similar to the nanostructure of native bone and shows overall increased mechanical properties, cell proliferation, osteogenic differentiation and scaffold mineralisation, indicating a promising approach for bone tissue regeneration.
AUTHOR Wang, Weiguang and Huang, Boyang and Byun, Jae Jong and Bártolo, Paulo
Title Assessment of PCL/carbon material scaffolds for bone regeneration [Abstract]
Year 2019
Journal/Proceedings Journal of the Mechanical Behavior of Biomedical Materials
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Biomanufacturing is a relatively new research domain focusing on the use of additive manufacturing technologies, biomaterials, cells and biomolecular signals to produce tissue constructs for tissue engineering. For bone regeneration, researchers are focusing on the use of polymeric and polymer/ceramic scaffolds seeded with osteoblasts or mesenchymal stem cells. However, the design of high-performance scaffolds in terms of mechanical, cell-stimulation and biological performance is still required. This is the first paper investigating the use of an extrusion additive manufacturing system to produce poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL), PCL/graphene nanosheet (GNS) and PCL/carbon nanotube (CNT) scaffolds for bone applications. Scaffolds with regular and reproducible architecture were produced and evaluated from chemical, physical and biological points of view. Results suggest that the addition of both graphene and CNT allow the fabrication of scaffolds with improved properties. It also shows that scaffolds containing graphene present better mechanical properties and high cell-affinity improving cell attachment, proliferation and differentiation.
AUTHOR Huang, Boyang and Vyas, Cian and Roberts, Iwan and Poutrel, Quentin-Arthur and Chiang, Wei-Hung and Blaker, Jonny J. and Huang, Zhucheng and Bártolo, Paulo
Title Fabrication and characterisation of 3D printed MWCNT composite porous scaffolds for bone regeneration [Abstract]
Year 2019
Journal/Proceedings Materials Science and Engineering: C
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Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with exceptional physical and chemical properties are attracting significant interest in the field of tissue engineering. Several reports investigated CNTs biocompatibility and their impact in terms of cell attachment, proliferation and differentiation mainly using polymer/CNTs membranes. However, these 2D membranes are not able to emulate the complex in vivo environment. In this paper, additive manufacturing (3D printing) is used to create composite 3D porous scaffolds containing different loadings of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) (0.25, 0.75 and 3 wt%) for bone tissue regeneration. Pre-processed and processed materials were extensively characterised in terms of printability, morphological and topographic characteristics and thermal, mechanical and biological properties. Scaffolds with pore sizes ranging between 366 μm and 397 μm were successfully produced and able to sustain early-stage human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells attachment and proliferation. Results show that MWCNTs enhances protein adsorption, mechanical and biological properties. Composite scaffolds, particularly the 3 wt% loading of MWCNTs, seem to be good candidates for bone tissue regeneration.
AUTHOR Pedrotty, Dawn M. and Volodymyr, Kuzmenko and Erdem, Karabulut and Sugrue Alan, M. and Christopher, Livia and Vaidya Vaibhav, R. and McLeod Christopher, J. and Asirvatham Samuel, J. and Paul, Gatenholm and Suraj, Kapa
Title Three-Dimensional Printed Biopatches With Conductive Ink Facilitate Cardiac Conduction When Applied to Disrupted Myocardium
Year 2019
Journal/Proceedings Circulation: Arrhythmia and Electrophysiology
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AUTHOR Kuzmenko, Volodymyr and Karabulut, Erdem and Pernevik, Elin and Enoksson, Peter and Gatenholm, Paul
Title Tailor-made conductive inks from cellulose nanofibrils for 3D printing of neural guidelines [Abstract]
Year 2018
Journal/Proceedings Carbohydrate Polymers
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Neural tissue engineering (TE), an innovative biomedical method of brain study, is very dependent on scaffolds that support cell development into a functional tissue. Recently, 3D patterned scaffolds for neural TE have shown significant positive effects on cells by a more realistic mimicking of actual neural tissue. In this work, we present a conductive nanocellulose-based ink for 3D printing of neural TE scaffolds. It is demonstrated that by using cellulose nanofibrils and carbon nanotubes as ink constituents, it is possible to print guidelines with a diameter below 1 mm and electrical conductivity of 3.8 × 10−1 S cm−1. The cell culture studies reveal that neural cells prefer to attach, proliferate, and differentiate on the 3D printed conductive guidelines. To our knowledge, this is the first research effort devoted to using cost-effective cellulosic 3D printed structures in neural TE, and we suppose that much more will arise in the near future.
AUTHOR Håkansson, Karl M. O. and Henriksson, Ida C. and de la Peña Vázquez, Cristina and Kuzmenko, Volodymyr and Markstedt, Kajsa and Enoksson, Peter and Gatenholm, Paul
Title Solidification of 3D Printed Nanofibril Hydrogels into Functional 3D Cellulose Structures [Abstract]
Year 2016
Journal/Proceedings Advanced Materials Technologies
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Cellulose nanofibrils isolated from trees have the potential to be used as raw material for future sustainable products within the areas of packaging, textiles, biomedical devices, and furniture. However, one unsolved problem has been to convert the nanofibril-hydrogel into a dry 3D structure. In this study, 3D printing is used to convert a cellulose nanofibril hydrogel into 3D structures with controlled architectures. Such structures collapse upon drying, but by using different drying processes the collapse can be controlled and the 3D structure can be preserved upon solidification. In addition, a conductive cellulose nanofibril ink is fabricated by adding carbon nanotubes. These findings enable the use of wood derived materials in 3D printing for fabrication of sustainable commodities such as packaging, textiles, biomedical devices, and furniture with conductive parts. Furthermore, with the introduction of biopolymers into 3D printing, the 3D printing technology itself can finally be regarded as sustainable.