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AUTHOR Sarmin, Atiya M. and El Moussaid, Nadia and Suntornnond, Ratima and Tyler, Eleanor J. and Kim, Yang-Hee and Di Cio, Stefania and Megone, William V. and Pearce, Oliver and Gautrot, Julien E. and Dawson, Jonathan and Connelly, John T.
Title Multi-Scale Analysis of the Composition, Structure, and Function of Decellularized Extracellular Matrix for Human Skin and Wound Healing Models [Abstract]
Year 2022
Journal/Proceedings Biomolecules
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DOI/URL URL DOI
Abstract
The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a complex mixture of structural proteins, proteoglycans, and signaling molecules that are essential for tissue integrity and homeostasis. While a number of recent studies have explored the use of decellularized ECM (dECM) as a biomaterial for tissue engineering, the complete composition, structure, and mechanics of these materials remain incompletely understood. In this study, we performed an in-depth characterization of skin-derived dECM biomaterials for human skin equivalent (HSE) models. The dECM materials were purified from porcine skin, and through mass spectrometry profiling, we quantified the presence of major ECM molecules, including types I, III, and VI collagen, fibrillin, and lumican. Rheological analysis demonstrated the sol-gel and shear-thinning properties of dECM materials, indicating their physical suitability as a tissue scaffold, while electron microscopy revealed a complex, hierarchical structure of nanofibers in dECM hydrogels. The dECM materials were compatible with advanced biofabrication techniques, including 3D printing within a gelatin microparticle support bath, printing with a sacrificial material, or blending with other ECM molecules to achieve more complex compositions and structures. As a proof of concept, we also demonstrate how dECM materials can be fabricated into a 3D skin wound healing model using 3D printing. Skin-derived dECM therefore represents a complex and versatile biomaterial with advantageous properties for the fabrication of next-generation HSEs.
AUTHOR Kang, Yuan and Wang, Chaoli and Qiao, Youbei and Gu, Junwei and Zhang, Han and Peijs, Ton and Kong, Jie and Zhang, Guangcheng and Shi, Xuetao
Title Tissue-Engineered Trachea Consisting of Electrospun Patterned sc-PLA/GO-g-IL Fibrous Membranes with Antibacterial Property and 3D-Printed Skeletons with Elasticity [Abstract]
Year 2019
Journal/Proceedings Biomacromolecules
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DOI/URL DOI
Abstract
In this study, a tissue-engineered trachea, consisting of multilevel structural electrospun polylactide (PLA) membranes enveloping 3D-printed thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) skeletons, was developed to create a mechanically robust, antibacterial and bioresorbable graft for the tracheal reconstruction. The study design incorporated two distinct uses of stereocomplex PLA: patterned electrospun fibers to enhance tissue integration compared to the random layered fibers, meanwhile possessing good antibacterial property; and 3D-printed TPU scaffold with elasticity to provide external support and protection. Herein, ionic liquid (IL)-functioned graphene oxide (GO) was synthesized and presented enhanced mechanical and hydrophilicity properties. More interesting, antibacterial activity of the GO-g-IL modified PLA membranes were proved by Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, showing superior antibacterial effect compared to single GO or IL. The synergistic antibacterial effect could be related to that GO break cytomembrane of bacteria by its extremely sharp edges, while IL works by electrostatic interaction between its cationic structures and electronegative phosphate groups of bacteria membranes, leading to the loss of cell electrolyte and cell death. Hence, after L929 fibroblast cells were seeded on patterned fibrous membranes with phenotypic shape, further effective cell infiltration, cell proliferation and attachment were observed. In addition, the tissue-engineered trachea scaffolds were implanted into rabbit models. The in vivo result confirmed that the scaffolds with patterned membranes manifested favorable biocompatibility and promoted tissue regeneration. In this study, a tissue-engineered trachea, consisting of multilevel structural electrospun polylactide (PLA) membranes enveloping 3D-printed thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) skeletons, was developed to create a mechanically robust, antibacterial and bioresorbable graft for the tracheal reconstruction. The study design incorporated two distinct uses of stereocomplex PLA: patterned electrospun fibers to enhance tissue integration compared to the random layered fibers, meanwhile possessing good antibacterial property; and 3D-printed TPU scaffold with elasticity to provide external support and protection. Herein, ionic liquid (IL)-functioned graphene oxide (GO) was synthesized and presented enhanced mechanical and hydrophilicity properties. More interesting, antibacterial activity of the GO-g-IL modified PLA membranes were proved by Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, showing superior antibacterial effect compared to single GO or IL. The synergistic antibacterial effect could be related to that GO break cytomembrane of bacteria by its extremely sharp edges, while IL works by electrostatic interaction between its cationic structures and electronegative phosphate groups of bacteria membranes, leading to the loss of cell electrolyte and cell death. Hence, after L929 fibroblast cells were seeded on patterned fibrous membranes with phenotypic shape, further effective cell infiltration, cell proliferation and attachment were observed. In addition, the tissue-engineered trachea scaffolds were implanted into rabbit models. The in vivo result confirmed that the scaffolds with patterned membranes manifested favorable biocompatibility and promoted tissue regeneration.