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AUTHOR Zamani, Yasaman and Amoabediny, Ghassem and Mohammadi, Javad and Zandieh-Doulabi, Behrouz and Klein-Nulend, Jenneke and Helder, Marco N.
Title Increased Osteogenic Potential of Pre-Osteoblasts on Three-Dimensional Printed Scaffolds Compared to Porous Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration [Abstract]
Year 2021
Journal/Proceedings Iranian Biomedical Journal
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Background: One of the main challenges with conventional scaffold fabrication methods is the inability to control scaffold architecture. Recently, scaffolds with controlled shape and architecture have been fabricated using three-dimensional printing (3DP). Herein, we aimed to determine whether the much tighter control of microstructure of 3DP poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid/β-tricalcium phosphate (PLGA/β-TCP) scaffolds is more effective in promoting osteogenesis than porous scaffolds produced by solvent casting/porogen leaching. Methods: Physical and mechanical properties of porous and 3DP scaffolds were studied. The response of pre-osteoblasts to the scaffolds was analyzed after 14 days. Results: The 3DP scaffolds had a smoother surface (Ra: 22 ± 3 µm) relative to the highly rough surface of porous scaffolds (Ra: 110 ± 15 µm). Water contact angle was 112 ± 4° on porous and 76 ± 6° on 3DP scaffolds. Porous and 3DP scaffolds had the pore size of 408 ± 90 and 315 ± 17 µm and porosity of 85 ± 5% and 39 ± 7%, respectively. Compressive strength of 3DP scaffolds (4.0 ± 0.3 MPa) was higher than porous scaffolds (1.7 ± 0.2 MPa). Collagenous matrix deposition was similar on both scaffolds. Cells proliferated from day 1 to day 14 by fourfold in porous and by 3.8-fold in 3DP scaffolds. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity was 21-fold higher in 3DP scaffolds than porous scaffolds. Conclusion: The 3DP scaffolds show enhanced mechanical properties and ALP activity compared to porous scaffolds in vitro, suggesting that 3DP PLGA/β-TCP scaffolds are possibly more favorable for bone formation.
AUTHOR Zamani, Yasaman and Amoabediny, Ghassem and Mohammadi, Javad and Seddiqi, Hadi and Helder, Marco N. and Zandieh-Doulabi, Behrouz and Klein-Nulend, Jenneke and Koolstra, Jan Harm
Title 3D-printed poly(Ɛ-caprolactone) scaffold with gradient mechanical properties according to force distribution in the mandible for mandibular bone tissue engineering [Abstract]
Year 2020
Journal/Proceedings Journal of the Mechanical Behavior of Biomedical Materials
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In bone tissue engineering, prediction of forces induced to the native bone during normal functioning is important in the design, fabrication, and integration of a scaffold with the host. The aim of this study was to customize the mechanical properties of a layer-by-layer 3D-printed poly(ϵ-caprolactone) (PCL) scaffold estimated by finite element (FE) modeling in order to match the requirements of the defect, to prevent mechanical failure, and ensure optimal integration with the surrounding tissue. Forces and torques induced on the mandibular symphysis during jaw opening and closing were predicted by FE modeling. Based on the predicted forces, homogeneous-structured PCL scaffolds with 3 different void sizes (0.3, 0.6, and 0.9 mm) were designed and 3D-printed using an extrusion based 3D-bioprinter. In addition, 2 gradient-structured scaffolds were designed and 3D-printed. The first gradient scaffold contained 2 regions (0.3 mm and 0.6 mm void size in the upper and lower half, respectively), whereas the second gradient scaffold contained 3 regions (void sizes of 0.3, 0.6, and 0.9 mm in the upper, middle and lower third, respectively). Scaffolds were tested for their compressive and tensile strength in the upper and lower halves. The actual void size of the homogeneous scaffolds with designed void size of 0.3, 0.6, and 0.9 mm was 0.20, 0.59, and 0.95 mm, respectively. FE modeling showed that during opening and closing of the jaw, the highest force induced on the symphysis was a compressive force in the transverse direction. The compressive force was induced throughout the symphyseal line and reduced from top (362.5 N, compressive force) to bottom (107.5 N, tensile force) of the symphysis. Compressive and tensile strength of homogeneous scaffolds decreased by 1.4-fold to 3-fold with increasing scaffold void size. Both gradient scaffolds had higher compressive strength in the upper half (2 region-gradient scaffold: 4.9 MPa; 3 region-gradient scaffold: 4.1 MPa) compared with the lower half (2 region-gradient scaffold: 2.5 MPa; 3 region-gradient scaffold: 2.7 MPa) of the scaffold. 3D-printed PCL scaffolds had higher compressive strength in the scaffold layer-by-layer building direction compared with the side direction, and a very low tensile strength in the scaffold layer-by-layer building direction. Fluid shear stress and fluid pressure distribution in the gradient scaffolds were more homogeneous than in the 0.3 mm void size scaffold and similar to the 0.6 mm and 0.9 mm void size scaffolds. In conclusion, these data show that the mechanical properties of 3D-printed PCL scaffolds can be tailored based on the predicted forces on the mandibular symphysis. These 3D-printed PCL scaffolds had different mechanical properties in scaffold building direction compared with the side direction, which should be taken into account when placing the scaffold in the defect site. Our findings might have implications for improved performance and integration of scaffolds with native tissue.
AUTHOR Zamani, Yasaman and Mohammadi, Javad and Amoabediny, Ghassem and Helder, Marco N. and Zandieh-Doulabi, Behrouz and Klein-Nulend, Jenneke
Title Bioprinting of Alginate-Encapsulated Pre-osteoblasts in PLGA/β-TCP Scaffolds Enhances Cell Retention but Impairs Osteogenic Differentiation Compared to Cell Seeding after 3D-Printing [Abstract]
Year 2020
Journal/Proceedings Regenerative Engineering and Translational Medicine
Reftype Zamani2020
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In tissue engineering, cellularization of scaffolds has typically been performed by seeding the cells after scaffold fabrication. 3D-printing technology now allows bioprinting of cells encapsulated in a hydrogel simultaneously with the scaffold material. Here, we aimed to investigate whether bioprinting or cell seeding post-printing is more effective in enhancing responses of pre-osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cell line derived from mouse calvaria.
AUTHOR Visscher, D. O. and Gleadall, A. and Buskermolen, J. K. and Burla, F. and Segal, J. and Koenderink, G. H. and Helder, M. N. and van Zuijlen, P. P. M.
Title Design and fabrication of a hybrid alginate hydrogel/poly(ε-caprolactone) mold for auricular cartilage reconstruction [Abstract]
Year 2018
Journal/Proceedings Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B: Applied Biomaterials
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Abstract The aim of this study was to design and manufacture an easily assembled cartilage implant model for auricular reconstruction. First, the printing accuracy and mechanical properties of 3D-printed poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL) scaffolds with varying porosities were determined to assess overall material properties. Next, the applicability of alginate as cell carrier for the cartilage implant model was determined. Using the optimal outcomes of both experiments (in terms of (bio)mechanical properties, cell survival, neocartilage formation, and printing accuracy), a hybrid auricular implant model was developed. PCL scaffolds with 600 μm distances between strands exhibited the best mechanical properties and most optimal printing quality for further exploration. In alginate, chondrocytes displayed high cell survival (~83% after 21 days) and produced cartilage-like matrix in vitro. Alginate beads cultured in proliferation medium exhibited slightly higher compressive moduli (6 kPa) compared to beads cultured in chondrogenic medium (3.5 kPa, p > .05). The final auricular mold could be printed with 300 μm pores and high fidelity, and the injected chondrocytes survived the culture period of 21 days. The presented hybrid auricular mold appears to be an adequate model for cartilage tissue engineering and may provide a novel approach to auricular cartilage regeneration for facial reconstruction. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res B Part B: Appl Biomater, 2018.
AUTHOR Zamani, Yasaman and Mohammadi, Javad and Amoabediny, Ghassem and Visscher, Dafydd O. and Helder, Marco N. and Zandieh-Doulabi, Behrouz and Klein-Nulend, Jenneke
Title Enhanced osteogenic activity by {MC}3T3-E1 pre-osteoblasts on chemically surface-modified poly($upepsilon$-caprolactone) 3D-printed scaffolds compared to {RGD} immobilized scaffolds [Abstract]
Year 2018
Journal/Proceedings Biomedical Materials
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In bone tissue engineering, the intrinsic hydrophobicity and surface smoothness of three-dimensional (3D)-printed poly(ε-caprolactone) scaffolds hamper cell attachment, proliferation and differentiation. This intrinsic hydrophobicity of poly(ε-caprolactone) can be overcome by surface modifications, such as surface chemical modification or immobilization of biologically active molecules on the surface. Moreover, surface chemical modification may alter surface smoothness. Whether surface chemical modification or immobilization of a biologically active molecule on the surface is more effective to enhance pre-osteoblast proliferation and differentiation is currently unknown. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the osteogenic response of MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblasts to chemically surface-modified and RGD-immobilized 3D-printed poly(ε-caprolactone) scaffolds. Poly(ε-caprolactone) scaffolds were 3D-printed consisting of strands deposited layer by layer with alternating 0°/90° lay-down pattern. 3D-printed poly(ε-caprolactone) scaffolds were surface-modified by either chemical modification using 3 M sodium hydroxide (NaOH) for 24 or 72 h, or by RGD-immobilization. Strands were visualized by scanning electron microscopy. MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblasts were seeded onto the scaffolds and cultured up to 14 d. The strands of the unmodified poly(ε-caprolactone) scaffold had a smooth surface. NaOH treatment changed the scaffold surface topography from smooth to a honeycomb-like surface pattern, while RGD immobilization did not alter the surface topography. MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblast seeding efficiency was similar (44%–54%) on all scaffolds after 12 h. Cell proliferation increased from day 1 to day 14 in unmodified controls (1.9-fold), 24 h NaOH-treated scaffolds (3-fold), 72 h NaOH-treated scaffolds (2.2-fold), and RGD-immobilized scaffolds (4.5-fold). At day 14, increased collagenous matrix deposition was achieved only on 24 h NaOH-treated (1.8-fold) and RGD-immobilized (2.2-fold) scaffolds compared to unmodified controls. Moreover, 24 h, but not 72 h, NaOH-treated scaffolds, increased alkaline phosphatase activity by 5-fold, while the increase by RGD immobilization was only 2.5-fold. Only 24 h NaOH-treated scaffolds enhanced mineralization (2.0-fold) compared to unmodified controls. In conclusion, RGD immobilization (0.011 μg mg−1 scaffold) on the surface and 24 h NaOH treatment of the surface of 3D-printed PCL scaffold both enhance pre-osteoblast proliferation and matrix deposition while only 24 h NaOH treatment results in increased osteogenic activity, making it the treatment of choice to promote bone formation by osteogenic cells.
AUTHOR Kelder, Cindy and Bakker, Astrid Diana and Klein-Nulend, Jenneke and Wismeijer, Daniël
Title The 3D Printing of Calcium Phosphate with K-Carrageenan under Conditions Permitting the Incorporation of Biological Components—A Method [Abstract]
Year 2018
Journal/Proceedings Journal of Functional Biomaterials
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Critical-size bone defects are a common clinical problem. The golden standard to treat these defects is autologous bone grafting. Besides the limitations of availability and co-morbidity, autografts have to be manually adapted to fit in the defect, which might result in a sub-optimal fit and impaired healing. Scaffolds with precise dimensions can be created using 3-dimensional (3D) printing, enabling the production of patient-specific, ‘tailor-made’ bone substitutes with an exact fit. Calcium phosphate (CaP) is a popular material for bone tissue engineering due to its biocompatibility, osteoconductivity, and biodegradable properties. To enhance bone formation, a bioactive 3D-printed CaP scaffold can be created by combining the printed CaP scaffold with biological components such as growth factors and cytokines, e.g., vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2), and interleukin-6 (IL-6). However, the 3D-printing of CaP with a biological component is challenging since production techniques often use high temperatures or aggressive chemicals, which hinders/inactivates the bioactivity of the incorporated biological components. Therefore, in our laboratory, we routinely perform extrusion-based 3D-printing with a biological binder at room temperature to create porous scaffolds for bone healing. In this method paper, we describe in detail a 3D-printing procedure for CaP paste with K-carrageenan as a biological binder.
AUTHOR Visscher, Dafydd O. and Bos, Ernst J. and Peeters, Mirte and Kuzmin, Nikolay V. and Groot, Marie Louise and Helder, Marco N. and van Zuijlen, Paul P. M.
Title Cartilage Tissue Engineering: Preventing Tissue Scaffold Contraction Using a 3D-Printed Polymeric Cage. [Abstract]
Year 2016
Journal/Proceedings Tissue engineering Part C: Methods
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Scaffold contraction is a common but underestimated problem in the field of tissue engineering. It becomes particularly problematic when creating anatomically complex shapes such as the ear. The aim of this study was to develop a contraction-free biocompatible scaffold construct for ear cartilage tissue engineering. To address this aim, we used three constructs: (i) a fibrin/hyaluronic acid (FB/HA) hydrogel, (ii) a FB/HA hydrogel combined with a collagen I/III scaffold, and (iii) a cage construct containing (ii) surrounded by a 3D-printed poly-varepsilon-caprolactone mold. A wide range of different cell types were tested within these constructs, including chondrocytes, perichondrocytes, adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells, and their combinations. After in vitro culturing for 1, 14, and 28 days, all constructs were analyzed. Macroscopic observation showed severe contraction of the cell-seeded hydrogel (i). This could be prevented, in part, by combining the hydrogel with the collagen scaffold (ii) and prevented in total using the 3D-printed cage construct (iii). (Immuno)histological analysis, multiphoton laser scanning microscopy, and biomechanical analysis showed extracellular matrix deposition and increased Young's modulus and thereby the feasibility of ear cartilage engineering. These results demonstrated that the 3D-printed cage construct is an adequate model for contraction-free ear cartilage engineering using a range of cell combinations.