REGENHU-Switzerland-3d-bioprinting-instrument-bio-3d-bioprinter-DevelopmentTeam-0006

SCIENTIFIC PUBLICATIONS

You are researching: Volumetric Strand Dispenser
Matching entries: 10 /10
All Groups
AUTHOR Browning, James R. and Derr, Paige and Derr, Kristy and Doudican, Nicole and Michael, Sam and Lish, Samantha R. and Taylor, Nicholas A. and Krueger, James G. and Ferrer, Marc and Carucci, John A. and Gareau, Daniel S.
Title A 3D biofabricated cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma tissue model with multi-channel confocal microscopy imaging biomarkers to quantify antitumor effects of chemotherapeutics in tissue [Abstract]
Year 2020
Journal/Proceedings Oncotarget; Vol 11, No 27
Reftype
DOI/URL URL
Abstract
// James R. Browning 1 , Paige Derr 2 , Kristy Derr 2 , Nicole Doudican 3 , Sam Michael 2 , Samantha R. Lish 1 , Nicholas A. Taylor 3 , James G. Krueger 1 , Marc Ferrer 2 , John A. Carucci 3 and Daniel S. Gareau 1 1 Laboratory for Investigative Dermatology, The Rockefeller University, New York, New York, USA 2 National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Rockville, Maryland, USA 3 The Ronald O. Perelman Department of Dermatology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York, USA Correspondence to: Daniel S. Gareau, email: dgareau@rockefeller.edu Keywords: squamous cell carcinoma; screening; 3D printing; in vitro model; confocal microscopy Received: January 05, 2020     Accepted: April 03, 2020     Published: July 07, 2020 ABSTRACT Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC) causes approximately 10,000 deaths annually in the U. S. Current therapies are largely ineffective against metastatic and locally advanced cSCC. There is a need to identify novel, effective, and less toxic small molecule cSCC therapeutics. We developed a 3-dimensional bioprinted skin (3DBPS) model of cSCC tumors together with a microscopy assay to test chemotherapeutic effects in tissue. The full thickness SCC tissue model was validated using hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and immunohistochemical histological staining, confocal microscopy, and cDNA microarray analysis. A nondestructive, 3D fluorescence confocal imaging assay with tdTomato-labeled A431 SCC and ZsGreen-labeled keratinocytes was developed to test efficacy and general toxicity of chemotherapeutics. Fluorescence-derived imaging biomarkers indicated that 50% of cancer cells were killed in the tissue after 1?M 5-Fluorouracil 48-hour treatment, compared to a baseline of 12% for untreated controls. The imaging biomarkers also showed that normal keratinocytes were less affected by treatment (11% killed) than the untreated tissue, which had no significant killing effect. Data showed that 5-Fluorouracil selectively killed cSCC cells more than keratinocytes. Our 3DBPS assay platform provides cellular-level measurement of cell viability and can be adapted to achieve nondestructive high-throughput screening (HTS) in bio-fabricated tissues.
AUTHOR Wei, Zhengxi and Liu, Xue and Ooka, Masato and Zhang, Li and Song, Min Jae and Huang, Ruili and Kleinstreuer, Nicole C. and Simeonov, Anton and Xia, Menghang and Ferrer, Marc
Title Two-Dimensional Cellular and Three-Dimensional Bio-Printed Skin Models to Screen Topical-Use Compounds for Irritation Potential [Abstract]
Year 2020
Journal/Proceedings Frontiers in Bioengineering and Biotechnology
Reftype
DOI/URL DOI
Abstract
Assessing skin irritation potential is critical for the safety evaluation of topical drugs and other consumer products such as cosmetics. The use of advanced cellular models, as an alternative to replace animal testing in the safety evaluation for both consumer products and ingredients, is already mandated by law in the European Union (EU) and other countries. However, there has not yet been a large-scale comparison of the effects of topical-use compounds in different cellular skin models. This study assesses the irritation potential of topical-use compounds in different cellular models of the skin that are compatible with high throughput screening (HTS) platforms. A set of 451 topical-use compounds were first tested for cytotoxic effects using two-dimensional (2D) monolayer models of primary neonatal keratinocytes and immortalized human keratinocytes. Forty-six toxic compounds identified from the initial screen with the monolayer culture systems were further tested for skin irritation potential on reconstructed human epidermis (RhE) and full thickness skin (FTS) three-dimensional (3D) tissue model constructs. Skin irritation potential of the compounds was assessed by measuring tissue viability, trans-epithelial electrical resistance (TEER), and secretion of cytokines interleukin 1 alpha (IL-1α) and interleukin 18 (IL-18). Among known irritants, high concentrations of methyl violet and methylrosaniline decreased viability, lowered TEER, and increased IL-1α secretion in both RhE and FTS models, consistent with irritant properties. However, at low concentrations, these two compounds increased IL-18 secretion without affecting levels of secreted IL-1α, and did not reduce tissue viability and TEER, in either RhE or FTS models. This result suggests that at low concentrations, methyl violet and methylrosaniline have an allergic potential without causing irritation. Using both HTS-compatible 2D cellular and 3D tissue skin models, together with irritation relevant activity endpoints, we obtained data to help assess the irritation effects of topical-use compounds and identify potential dermal hazards.
AUTHOR Derr, Kristy and Zou, Jinyun and Luo, Keren and Song, Min Jae and Sittampalam, G. Sitta and Zhou, Chao and Michael, Samuel and Ferrer, Marc and Derr, Paige
Title Fully 3D Bioprinted Skin Equivalent Constructs with Validated Morphology and Barrier Function [Abstract]
Year 2019
Journal/Proceedings Tissue Engineering Part C: Methods
Reftype
DOI/URL DOI
Abstract
Development of high throughput, reproducible, three-dimensional bioprinted skin equivalents that are morphologically and functionally comparable to native skin tissue is advancing research in skin diseases, and providing a physiologically relevant platform for the development of therapeutics, transplants for regenerative medicine, and testing of skin products like cosmetics. Current protocols for the production of engineered skin rafts are limited in their ability to control three dimensional geometry of the structure and contraction leading to variability of skin function between constructs. Here we describe a method for the biofabrication of skin equivalents that are fully bioprinted using an open market bioprinter, made with commercially available primary cells and natural hydrogels. The unique hydrogel formulation allows for the production of a human-like skin equivalent with minimal lateral tissue contraction in a multiwell plate format, thus making them suitable for high throughput bioprinting in a single print with fast print and relatively short incubation times. The morphology and barrier function of the fully three-dimensional bioprinted skin equivalents are validated by immunohistochemistry staining, optical coherence tomography, and permeation assays.
AUTHOR Liu, Xue and Michael, Samuel and Bharti, Kapil and Ferrer, Marc and Song, Min Jae
Title A biofabricated vascularized skin model of atopic dermatitis for preclinical studies [Abstract]
Year 2020
Journal/Proceedings Biofabrication
Reftype
DOI/URL DOI
Abstract
Three-dimensional (3D) biofabrication techniques enable the production of multicellular tissue models as assay platforms for drug screening. The increased cellular and physiological complexity in these 3D tissue models should recapitulate the relevant biological environment found in the body. Here we describe the use of 3D bioprinting techniques to fabricate skin equivalent tissues of varying physiological complexity, including human epidermis, non-vascularized and vascularized full-thickness skin tissue equivalents, in a multi-well platform to enable drug screening. Human keratinocytes, fibroblasts, and pericytes, and induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived endothelial cells were used in the biofabrication process to produce the varying complexity. The skin equivalents exhibit the correct structural markers of dermis and epidermis stratification, with physiological functions of the skin barrier. The robustness, versatility and reproducibility of the biofabrication techniques are further highlighted by the generation of atopic dermatitis (AD)-disease like tissues. These AD models demonstrate several clinical hallmarks of the disease, including: (i) spongiosis and hyperplasia; (ii) early and terminal expression of differentiation proteins; and (iii) increases in levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines. We show the pre-clinical relevance of the biofabricated AD tissue models to correct disease phenotype by testing the effects of dexamethasone, an anti-inflammatory corticosteroid, and three Janus Kinase inhibitors from clinical trials for AD. This study demonstrates the development of a versatile and reproducible bioprinting approach to create human skin equivalents with a range of cellular complexity for disease modelling. In addition, we establish several assay readouts that are quantifiable, robust, AD relevant, and can be scaled up for compound screening. The results show that the cellular complexity of the tissues develops a more physiologically relevant AD disease model. Thus, the skin models in this study offer an in vitro approach for the rapid understanding of pathological mechanisms, and testing for efficacy of action and toxic effects of drugs.
AUTHOR Cakal, Selgin D. and Radeke, Carmen and Alcala, Juan F. and Ellman, Ditte G. and Butdayev, Sarkhan and Andersen, Ditte C. and Calloe, Kirstine and Lind, Johan U.
Title A simple and scalable 3D printing methodology for generating aligned and extended human and murine skeletal muscle tissues [Abstract]
Year 2022
Journal/Proceedings Biomedical Materials
Reftype
DOI/URL DOI
Abstract
Preclinical biomedical and pharmaceutical research on disease causes, drug targets, and side effects increasingly relies on in vitro models of human tissue. 3D printing offers unique opportunities for generating models of superior physiological accuracy, as well as for automating their fabrication. Towards these goals, we here describe a simple and scalable methodology for generating physiologically relevant models of skeletal muscle. Our approach relies on dual-material micro-extrusion of two types of gelatin hydrogel into patterned soft substrates with locally alternating stiffness. We identify minimally complex patterns capable of guiding the large-scale self-assembly of aligned, extended, and contractile human and murine skeletal myotubes. Interestingly, we find high-resolution patterning is not required, as even patterns with feature sizes of several hundred micrometers is sufficient. Consequently, the procedure is rapid and compatible with any low-cost extrusion-based 3D printer. The generated myotubes easily span several millimeters, and various myotube patterns can be generated in a predictable and reproducible manner. The compliant nature and adjustable thickness of the hydrogel substrates, serves to enable extended culture of contractile myotubes. The method is further readily compatible with standard cell-culturing platforms as well as commercially available electrodes for electrically induced exercise and monitoring of the myotubes.
AUTHOR Cadle, Rachel and Rogozea, Dan and Moldovan, Leni and Moldovan, Nicanor I.
Title Design and Implementation of Anatomically Inspired Mesenteric and Intestinal Vascular Patterns for Personalized 3D Bioprinting [Abstract]
Year 2022
Journal/Proceedings Applied Sciences
Reftype
DOI/URL URL DOI
Abstract
Recent progress in bioprinting has made possible the creation of complex 3D intestinal constructs, including vascularized villi. However, for their integration into functional units useful for experimentation or implantation, the next challenge is to endow them with a larger-scale, anatomically realistic vasculature. In general, the perfusion of bioprinted constructs has remained difficult, and the current solution is to provide them with mostly linear and simply branched channels. To address this limitation, here we demonstrated an image analysis-based workflow leading through computer-assisted design from anatomic images of rodent mesentery and colon to the actual printing of such patterns with paste and hydrogel bioinks. Moreover, we reverse-engineered the 2D intestinal image-derived designs into cylindrical objects, and 3D-printed them in a support hydrogel. These results open the path towards generation of more realistically vascularized tissue constructs for a variety of personalized medicine applications.
AUTHOR Rahimnejad, Maedeh and Adoungotchodo, Atma and Demarquette, Nicole R. and Lerouge, Sophie
Title FRESH bioprinting of biodegradable chitosan thermosensitive hydrogels [Abstract]
Year 2022
Journal/Proceedings Bioprinting
Reftype
DOI/URL URL DOI
Abstract
Thermosensitive chitosan (CH)-based hydrogels prepared with a mix of sodium bicarbonate and β-glycerophosphate as gelling agents rapidly pass from a liquid at room temperature to a mechanically strong solid at body temperature without any crosslinker. They show excellent potential for tissue engineering applications and could be interesting candidates for bioprinting. Unfortunately, since gelation is not instantaneous, formulations compatible with cell encapsulation (chitosan concentrations around 2% or lower) lead to very poor resolution and fidelity due to filament spreading. Here, we investigate the FRESH bioprinting approach with a warm sacrificial support bath, to overcome these limitations and enhance their bioprintability. First, a support bath, made of Pluronic including sodium chloride salt as a rheology modifier agent, was designed to meet the specific physical state requirements (solid at 37 °C and liquid at room temperature) and rheological properties appropriate for bioprinting. This support bath presented yield stress of over 100 Pa, a shear thinning behavior, and fast self-healing during cyclic recovery tests. Three different chitosan hydrogels (CH2%w/v, CH3%w/v, and a mixture of CH and gelatin) were tested for their ability to form filament and 3D structures, with and without a support bath. Both the resolution and mechanical properties of the printed structure were drastically enhanced using the FRESH method, with an approximate four fold decrease of the filament diameter which is close to the needle diameter. The printed structures were easily harvested without altering their shape by cooling down the support bath, and do not swell when immersed in PBS. Live/dead assays confirmed that the viability of encapsulated mesenchymal stem cells was highest in CH2% and that the support bath-assisted bioprinting process did not adversely impact cell viability. This study demonstrates that using a warm FRESH-like approach drastically enhances the potential for bioprinting of the thermosensitive biodegradable chitosan hydrogels and opens up a wide range of applications for 3D models and tissue engineering.
AUTHOR Salar Amoli, Mehdi and Anand, Resmi and EzEldeen, Mostafa and Amorim, Paulo Alexandre and Geris, Liesbet and Jacobs, Reinhilde and Bloemen, Veerle
Title The development of a 3D printable chitosan-based copolymer with tunable properties for dentoalveolar regeneration [Abstract]
Year 2022
Journal/Proceedings Carbohydrate Polymers
Reftype
DOI/URL URL DOI
Abstract
Dentoalveolar tissue engineering is an emerging yet challenging field, considering the lack of suitable materials and difficulty to produce patient-specific hydrogel scaffolds. The present paper aims to produce a 3D printable and tuneable biomaterial by copolymerizing a synthesized water-soluble chitosan derivative called maleic anhydride grafted chitosan (MA-C) with gelatin using genipin, a natural crosslinking agent. Development and testing of this material for 3D printing, degradation, and swelling demonstrated the ability to fabricate scaffolds with controlled physical properties based on pre-determined designs. The MA-C-gelatin copolymer demonstrated excellent biocompatibility, which was verified by analyzing the viability, growth and proliferation of human dental pulp stem cells seeded on MA-C-gelatin constructs through live/dead, alamar blue and DNA quantification assays. Based on the present findings, the proposed material might be a suitable candidate for dentoalveolar tissue engineering, while further research is required to achieve this goal.
AUTHOR Rachel Cadle and Dan Rogozea and Leni Moldovan and Patricia Parsons-Wingerter and Nicanor I. Moldovan
Title An image analysis-based workflow for 3D bioprinting of anatomically realistic retinal vascular patterns [Abstract]
Year 2021
Journal/Proceedings Bioprinting
Reftype
DOI/URL URL DOI
Abstract
There is an enduring need for vascularization of bioprinted constructs with vascular networks optimized for distribution of nutrient-containing fluids, both for in vitro applications and in vivo implantation. However, most of the efforts in this field were directed so far towards generation of simple linear channels, often lined with endothelial cells only, and thus lacking the anatomical details of real vascular networks. To start addressing this need, here we explored the possibility of using actual vascular patterns derived from human ocular fundus for instructing the 3D printing activity. In order to assign to these patterns the organ-specific topology, and eventually vessel branch-defined cellular composition, we describe the use of the branching analysis program VESGEN 2D for planning a workflow that links the primary vascular images with their 3D printing with bioinks. To this end, we show how to process flat vascular images and, for an even more realistic representation, how to retro-engineer concave retinal patterns from flat images and to print them in a supporting hydrogel. This work opens the possibility of bioprinting more anatomically realistic vascular networks, and thus to eventually improve the vascularization of living tissue-engineered constructs.
AUTHOR García-Astrain, Clara and Lenzi, Elisa and Jimenez de Aberasturi, Dorleta and Henriksen-Lacey, Malou and Binelli, Marco R. and Liz-Marzán, Luis M.
Title 3D-Printed Biocompatible Scaffolds with Built-In Nanoplasmonic Sensors [Abstract]
Year 2020
Journal/Proceedings Advanced Functional Materials
Reftype
DOI/URL DOI
Abstract
Abstract 3D printing strategies have acquired great relevance toward the design of 3D scaffolds with precise macroporous structures, for supported mammalian cell growth. Despite advances in 3D model designs, there is still a shortage of detection tools to precisely monitor in situ cell behavior in 3D, thereby allowing a better understanding of the progression of diseases or to test the efficacy of drugs in a more realistic microenvironment. Even if the number of available inks has exponentially increased, they do not necessarily offer the required functionalities to be used as internal sensors. Herein the potential of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy for the detection of biorelevant analytes within a plasmonic hydrogel-based, 3D-printed scaffold is demonstrated. Such SERS-active scaffolds allow for the 3D detection of model molecules, such as 4-mercaptobenzoic acid. Flexibility in the choice of plasmonic nanoparticles is demonstrated through the use of gold nanoparticles with different morphologies, gold nanorods showing the best balance between SERS enhancement and scaffold transparency. Detection of the biomarker adenosine is also demonstrated as a proof-of-concept toward the use of these plasmonic scaffolds for SERS sensing of cell-secreted molecules over extended periods of time.