regenHU provides cutting-edge bioprinting solutions to enable your scientific & clinical ambitions.

We support research at the global forefront of science. Applications such as tissue engineering, personalized medicine, and pharma are using our technology to their advantage.

Which healthcare breakthroughs do you want to accomplish? 

Scientific Publications  Partners Achievements


NEWS | EVENTS

Events
09.04.2019 - 10.04.2019
Cell Production Centre of CHUV Hospital of Lausanne

EUROCLONE presents - 5th Isolation Techniques in Advanced Therapy Applications International Workshop

Marc Thurner, CEO regenHU Ltd, is pleased to talk about the future of 3D Bioprinting at the @Euroclone SpA event – A technology enabler to biofabricate in-vivo like tissues.

Discover the complete program.

Read more
Partners achievements
14.03.2019
AO Research Institute

A Stimuli-Responsive Nanocomposite for 3D Anisotropic Cell-Guidance and Magnetic Soft Robotics

"A novel method is presented to biofabricate anisotropic nanocomposite  hydrogels through a mild and biocompatible process driven by multiple  external stimuli: magnetic field, temperature, and light. The  functionality of this stimuliresponsive hydrogel is studied creating i)  3D cell-instructive platforms for in vitro morphogenesis, and ii) a 3D  printable magnetoresponsive ink for fabricating small-scale bioinspired soft robots"

source : Advandced Science News

Read more
News
10.09.2018
20 Minuten

Organe aus dem 3D-Drucker könnten Leben retten

Organversagen ist lebensbedrohlich, doch Spenderorgane sind rar. Deshalb wollen Mediziner Organe im Labor herstellen –zum Beispiel mittels 3D-Drucker. (Life-Sciences-Woche, Teil 1/5)

Read more

BIOPRINTING SOLUTIONS

3D BIOPRINTERS

– 3DDISCOVERY™

– 3DDISCOVERY™ EVOLUTION

– BIOFACTORY™

Read more

BIOMATERIALS

– ECM BIOINK™

– OSTEOINK™

– STARK™

Read more

BIOPRINTING SOFTWARE

– BioCAM™

– BioCAD™

– BioCUT™

Read more

PARTNERS ACHIEVEMENTS

A Stimuli-Responsive Nanocomposite for 3D Anisotropic Cell-Guidance and Magnetic Soft Robotics

"A novel method is presented to biofabricate anisotropic nanocomposite  hydrogels through a mild and biocompatible process driven by multiple  external stimuli: magnetic field, temperature, and light. The  functionality of this stimuliresponsive hydrogel is studied creating i)  3D cell-instructive platforms for in vitro morphogenesis, and ii) a 3D  printable magnetoresponsive ink for fabricating small-scale bioinspired soft robots"

source : Advandced Science News

Read more

Bioprinting with Biogelx-Ink

Álvaro Sánchez Rubio, a Ph.D. researcher at the University of Glasgow, is printing with Biogelx-Ink-S.

Source: Biogelx Limited

Read more

Replicating the architecture of cartilage and bone

"This project has received funding from the European Research Council (ERC) under the: European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme (grant agreement No [647426])"

sources: UMC Utrecht

Read more

SCIENTIFIC PUBLICATIONS

Spatially-offset Raman spectroscopy for monitoring mineralization of bone tissue engineering scaffolds: feasibility study based on phantom samples

Author: Max Dooley and Aruna Prasopthum and Zhiyu Liao and Faris Sinjab and Jane McLaren and Felicity R. A. J. Rose and Jing Yang and Ioan Notingher

Abstract: Using phantom samples, we investigated the feasibility of spatially-offset Raman spectroscopy (SORS) as a tool for monitoring non-invasively the mineralization of bone tissue engineering scaffold in-vivo. The phantom samples consisted of 3D-printed scaffolds of poly-caprolactone (PCL) and hydroxyapatite (HA) blends, with varying concentrations of HA, to mimic the mineralisation process. The scaffolds were covered by a 4 mm layer of skin to simulate the real in-vivo measurement conditions. At a concentration of HA approximately 1/3 that of bone (~0.6 g/cm3), the characteristic Raman band of HA (960 cm\&\#x2212;1) was detectable when the PCL:HA layer was located at 4 mm depth within the scaffold (i.e. 8 mm below the skin surface). For the layers of the PCL:HA immediately under the skin (i.e. top of the scaffold), the detection limit of HA was 0.18 g/cm3, which is approximately one order of magnitude lower than that of bone. Similar results were also found for the phantoms simulating uniform and inward gradual mineralisation of the scaffold, indicating the suitability of SORS to detect early stages of mineralisation. Nevertheless, the results also show that the contribution of the materials surrounding the scaffold can be significant and methods for subtraction need to be investigated in the future. In conclusion, these results indicate that spatially-offset Raman spectroscopy is a promising technique for in-vivo longitudinal monitoring scaffold mineralization and bone re-growth.

Read all the article