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You are researching: Iron Oxide Particles (IOP)
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AUTHOR Augurio, Adriana and Cortelletti, Paolo and Tognato, Riccardo and Rios, Anne and Levato, Riccardo and Malda, Jos and Alini, Mauro and Eglin, David and Giancane, Gabriele and Speghini, Adolfo and Serra, Tiziano
Title A Multifunctional Nanocomposite Hydrogel for Endoscopic Tracking and Manipulation [Abstract]
Year 2019
Journal/Proceedings Advanced Intelligent Systems
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Abstract
In this work, the fabrication of multi-responsive and hierarchically organized nanomaterial by using core-shell SrF2 upconverting nanoparticles, doped with Yb3+, Tm3+, Nd3+ incorporated into gelatin methacryloyl matrix, is reported. Upon 800 nm excitation, deep monitoring of 3D printed constructs is demonstrated. Addition of magnetic self-assembly of iron oxide nanoparticles within the hydrogel provides anisotropic structuration from the nano- to the macro-scale and magnetic responsiveness permitting remote manipulation. The present study provides a new strategy for the fabrication of a novel highly organized multi-responsive material using additive manufacturing, which could have important implications in biomedicine. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
AUTHOR Tognato, Riccardo and Armiento, Angela R. and Bonfrate, Valentina and Levato, Riccardo and Malda, Jos and Alini, Mauro and Eglin, David and Giancane, Gabriele and Serra, Tiziano
Title A Stimuli-Responsive Nanocomposite for 3D Anisotropic Cell-Guidance and Magnetic Soft Robotics [Abstract]
Year 2018
Journal/Proceedings Advanced Functional Materials
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Abstract Stimuli-responsive materials have the potential to enable the generation of new bioinspired devices with unique physicochemical properties and cell-instructive ability. Enhancing biocompatibility while simplifying the production methodologies, as well as enabling the creation of complex constructs, i.e., via 3D (bio)printing technologies, remains key challenge in the field. Here, a novel method is presented to biofabricate cellularized anisotropic hybrid hydrogel through a mild and biocompatible process driven by multiple external stimuli: magnetic field, temperature, and light. A low-intensity magnetic field is used to align mosaic iron oxide nanoparticles (IOPs) into filaments with tunable size within a gelatin methacryloyl matrix. Cells seeded on top or embedded within the hydrogel align to the same axes of the IOPs filaments. Furthermore, in 3D, C2C12 skeletal myoblasts differentiate toward myotubes even in the absence of differentiation media. 3D printing of the nanocomposite hydrogel is achieved and creation of complex heterogeneous structures that respond to magnetic field is demonstrated. By combining the advanced, stimuli-responsive hydrogel with the architectural control provided by bioprinting technologies, 3D constructs can also be created that, although inspired by nature, express functionalities beyond those of native tissue, which have important application in soft robotics, bioactuators, and bionic devices.
AUTHOR Bastola, A. K. and Paudel, M. and Li, L.
Title Development of hybrid magnetorheological elastomers by 3D printing [Abstract]
Year 2018
Journal/Proceedings Polymer
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Intelligent or smart materials have one or more properties that can be significantly changed in a controlled fashion by external stimuli, such as temperature, pH, electric or magnetic fields, etc. Magnetorheological (MR) materials are a class of smart materials whose properties can be varied by applying an external magnetic field. In this work, the possibility of employing a suitable 3D printing technology for the development of one of the smart MR materials, the magnetorheological elastomer (MRE) has been explored. In order to achieve such 3D printing, a multi-material printing is implemented, where a controlled volume of MR fluid is encapsulated within an elastomer matrix in the layer-by-layer fashion. The choice of printing materials determines the final structure of the 3D printed hybrid MR elastomer. Printing with a vulcanizing MR suspension produces the solid MR structure inside the elastomer matrix while printing with a non-vulcanizing MR suspension (MR fluid) results in the structures that the MR fluid is encapsulated inside the elastomer matrix. The 3D printability of different materials has been studied by measuring their rheological properties and we found that the highly shear thinning and thixotropic properties are important for 3D printability. The quality of the printed filaments strongly depends on the key printing parameters such as extrusion pressure, initial height and feed rate. The experimental results from the forced vibration testing show that the 3D printed MR elastomers could change their elastic and damping properties when exposed to the external magnetic field. Furthermore, the 3D printed MR elastomer also exhibits the anisotropic behavior when the direction of the magnetic field is changed with respect to the orientation of the printed filaments. This study has demonstrated that the 3D printing is viable for fabrication of hybrid MR elastomers with controlled structures of magnetic particles or MR fluids.
AUTHOR Bastola, A. K. and Hoang, V. T. and Li, L.
Title A novel hybrid magnetorheological elastomer developed by 3D printing [Abstract]
Year 2017
Journal/Proceedings Materials and Design
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Abstract In this study, a novel magnetorheological (MR) hybrid elastomer has been developed using a 3D printing method. In such an MR hybrid elastomer, a controlled volume of an MR fluid was encapsulated layer by layer into an elastomer matrix by means of a 3D printer and each layer was a composite structure consisting of an MR fluid and an elastomer. Similar to current MR fluids and MR elastomers, mechanical properties of 3D printed MR hybrid elastomers could be controlled via an externally applied magnetic field. The experimental results showed that the relative change in the damping capability of the new MR elastomer was more pronounced than the change in its stiffness when exposed to an external magnetic field. The study demonstrated that the 3D printing technique is feasible for fabrication of MR elastomers with controlled microstructures including magnetic particles or MR fluids. The 3D printed MR hybrid elastomer is also a potential material as a tunable spring-damper element.