REGENHU-Switzerland-3d-bioprinting-instrument-bio-3d-bioprinter-DevelopmentTeam-0006

SCIENTIFIC PUBLICATIONS

You are researching: Collagen
Matching entries: 16 /16
All Groups
AUTHOR Derr, Kristy and Zou, Jinyun and Luo, Keren and Song, Min Jae and Sittampalam, G. Sitta and Zhou, Chao and Michael, Samuel and Ferrer, Marc and Derr, Paige
Title Fully 3D Bioprinted Skin Equivalent Constructs with Validated Morphology and Barrier Function [Abstract]
Year 2019
Journal/Proceedings Tissue Engineering Part C: Methods
Reftype
DOI/URL DOI
Abstract
Development of high throughput, reproducible, three-dimensional bioprinted skin equivalents that are morphologically and functionally comparable to native skin tissue is advancing research in skin diseases, and providing a physiologically relevant platform for the development of therapeutics, transplants for regenerative medicine, and testing of skin products like cosmetics. Current protocols for the production of engineered skin rafts are limited in their ability to control three dimensional geometry of the structure and contraction leading to variability of skin function between constructs. Here we describe a method for the biofabrication of skin equivalents that are fully bioprinted using an open market bioprinter, made with commercially available primary cells and natural hydrogels. The unique hydrogel formulation allows for the production of a human-like skin equivalent with minimal lateral tissue contraction in a multiwell plate format, thus making them suitable for high throughput bioprinting in a single print with fast print and relatively short incubation times. The morphology and barrier function of the fully three-dimensional bioprinted skin equivalents are validated by immunohistochemistry staining, optical coherence tomography, and permeation assays.
AUTHOR Ng, Wei Long and Qi, Jovina Tan Zhi and Yeong, Wai Yee and Naing, May Win
Title Proof-of-concept: 3D bioprinting of pigmented human skin constructs [Abstract]
Year 2018
Journal/Proceedings Biofabrication
Reftype
DOI/URL DOI
Abstract
Three-dimensional (3D) pigmented human skin constructs have been fabricated using a 3D bioprinting approach. The 3D pigmented human skin constructs are obtained from using three different types of skin cells (keratinocytes, melanocytes and fibroblasts from three different skin donors) and they exhibit similar constitutive pigmentation (pale pigmentation) as the skin donors. A two-step drop-on-demand bioprinting strategy facilitates the deposition of cell droplets to emulate the epidermal melanin units (pre-defined patterning of keratinocytes and melanocytes at the desired positions) and manipulation of the microenvironment to fabricate 3D biomimetic hierarchical porous structures found in native skin tissue. The 3D bioprinted pigmented skin constructs are compared to the pigmented skin constructs fabricated by conventional a manual-casting approach; in-depth characterization of both the 3D pigmented skin constructs has indicated that the 3D bioprinted skin constructs have a higher degree of resemblance to native skin tissue in term of the presence of well-developed stratified epidermal layers and the presence of a continuous layer of basement membrane proteins as compared to the manually-cast samples. The 3D bioprinting approach facilitates the development of 3D in vitro pigmented human skin constructs for potential toxicology testing and fundamental cell biology research.
AUTHOR Kessel, Benjamin and Lee, Mihyun and Bonato, Angela and Tinguely, Yann and Tosoratti, Enrico and Zenobi-Wong, Marcy
Title 3D Bioprinting of Macroporous Materials Based on Entangled Hydrogel Microstrands [Abstract]
Year 2020
Journal/Proceedings Advanced Science
Reftype
DOI/URL DOI
Abstract
Abstract Hydrogels are excellent mimetics of mammalian extracellular matrices and have found widespread use in tissue engineering. Nanoporosity of monolithic bulk hydrogels, however, limits mass transport of key biomolecules. Microgels used in 3D bioprinting achieve both custom shape and vastly improved permissivity to an array of cell functions, however spherical-microbead-based bioinks are challenging to upscale, are inherently isotropic, and require secondary crosslinking. Here, bioinks based on high-aspect-ratio hydrogel microstrands are introduced to overcome these limitations. Pre-crosslinked, bulk hydrogels are deconstructed into microstrands by sizing through a grid with apertures of 40–100 µm. The microstrands are moldable and form a porous, entangled structure, stable in aqueous medium without further crosslinking. Entangled microstrands have rheological properties characteristic of excellent bioinks for extrusion bioprinting. Furthermore, individual microstrands align during extrusion and facilitate the alignment of myotubes. Cells can be placed either inside or outside the hydrogel phase with >90% viability. Chondrocytes co-printed with the microstrands deposit abundant extracellular matrix, resulting in a modulus increase from 2.7 to 780.2 kPa after 6 weeks of culture. This powerful approach to deconstruct bulk hydrogels into advanced bioinks is both scalable and versatile, representing an important toolbox for 3D bioprinting of architected hydrogels.
AUTHOR Rößler, Sina and Brückner, Andreas and Kruppke, Iris and Wiesmann, Hans-Peter and Hanke, Thomas and Kruppke, Benjamin
Title 3D Plotting of Silica/Collagen Xerogel Granules in an Alginate Matrix for Tissue-Engineered Bone Implants [Abstract]
Year 2021
Journal/Proceedings Materials
Reftype
DOI/URL URL DOI
Abstract
Today, materials designed for bone regeneration are requested to be degradable and resorbable, bioactive, porous, and osteoconductive, as well as to be an active player in the bone-remodeling process. Multiphasic silica/collagen Xerogels were shown, earlier, to meet these requirements. The aim of the present study was to use these excellent material properties of silica/collagen Xerogels and to process them by additive manufacturing, in this case 3D plotting, to generate implants matching patient specific shapes of fractures or lesions. The concept is to have Xerogel granules as active major components embedded, to a large proportion, in a matrix that binds the granules in the scaffold. By using viscoelastic alginate as matrix, pastes of Xerogel granules were processed via 3D plotting. Moreover, alginate concentration was shown to be the key to a high content of irregularly shaped Xerogel granules embedded in a minimum of matrix phase. Both the alginate matrix and Xerogel granules were also shown to influence viscoelastic behavior of the paste, as well as the dimensionally stability of the scaffolds. In conclusion, 3D plotting of Xerogel granules was successfully established by using viscoelastic properties of alginate as matrix phase.
AUTHOR Browning, James R. and Derr, Paige and Derr, Kristy and Doudican, Nicole and Michael, Sam and Lish, Samantha R. and Taylor, Nicholas A. and Krueger, James G. and Ferrer, Marc and Carucci, John A. and Gareau, Daniel S.
Title A 3D biofabricated cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma tissue model with multi-channel confocal microscopy imaging biomarkers to quantify antitumor effects of chemotherapeutics in tissue [Abstract]
Year 2020
Journal/Proceedings Oncotarget; Vol 11, No 27
Reftype
DOI/URL URL
Abstract
// James R. Browning 1 , Paige Derr 2 , Kristy Derr 2 , Nicole Doudican 3 , Sam Michael 2 , Samantha R. Lish 1 , Nicholas A. Taylor 3 , James G. Krueger 1 , Marc Ferrer 2 , John A. Carucci 3 and Daniel S. Gareau 1 1 Laboratory for Investigative Dermatology, The Rockefeller University, New York, New York, USA 2 National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Rockville, Maryland, USA 3 The Ronald O. Perelman Department of Dermatology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York, USA Correspondence to: Daniel S. Gareau, email: dgareau@rockefeller.edu Keywords: squamous cell carcinoma; screening; 3D printing; in vitro model; confocal microscopy Received: January 05, 2020     Accepted: April 03, 2020     Published: July 07, 2020 ABSTRACT Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC) causes approximately 10,000 deaths annually in the U. S. Current therapies are largely ineffective against metastatic and locally advanced cSCC. There is a need to identify novel, effective, and less toxic small molecule cSCC therapeutics. We developed a 3-dimensional bioprinted skin (3DBPS) model of cSCC tumors together with a microscopy assay to test chemotherapeutic effects in tissue. The full thickness SCC tissue model was validated using hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) and immunohistochemical histological staining, confocal microscopy, and cDNA microarray analysis. A nondestructive, 3D fluorescence confocal imaging assay with tdTomato-labeled A431 SCC and ZsGreen-labeled keratinocytes was developed to test efficacy and general toxicity of chemotherapeutics. Fluorescence-derived imaging biomarkers indicated that 50% of cancer cells were killed in the tissue after 1?M 5-Fluorouracil 48-hour treatment, compared to a baseline of 12% for untreated controls. The imaging biomarkers also showed that normal keratinocytes were less affected by treatment (11% killed) than the untreated tissue, which had no significant killing effect. Data showed that 5-Fluorouracil selectively killed cSCC cells more than keratinocytes. Our 3DBPS assay platform provides cellular-level measurement of cell viability and can be adapted to achieve nondestructive high-throughput screening (HTS) in bio-fabricated tissues.
AUTHOR Estermann, Manuela and Bisig, Christoph and Septiadi, Dedy and Petri-Fink, Alke and Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara
Title Bioprinting for Human Respiratory and Gastrointestinal In Vitro Models [Abstract]
Year 2020
Journal/Proceedings
Reftype
DOI/URL DOI
Abstract
Increasing ethical and biological concerns require a paradigm shift toward animal-free testing strategies for drug testing and hazard assessments. To this end, the application of bioprinting technology in the field of biomedicine is driving a rapid progress in tissue engineering. In particular, standardized and reproducible in vitro models produced by three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting technique represent a possible alternative to animal models, enabling in vitro studies relevant to in vivo conditions. The innovative approach of 3D bioprinting allows a spatially controlled deposition of cells and biomaterial in a layer-by-layer fashion providing a platform for engineering reproducible models. However, despite the promising and revolutionizing character of 3D bioprinting technology, standardized protocols providing detailed instructions are lacking. Here, we provide a protocol for the automatized printing of simple alveolar, bronchial, and intestine epithelial cell layers as the basis for more complex respiratory and gastrointestinal tissue models. Such systems will be useful for high-throughput toxicity screening and drug efficacy evaluation.
AUTHOR Sanz-Fraile, Hector and Amorós, Susana and Mendizabal, Irene Isabel and Gálvez-Montón, Carolina and Prat-Vidal, Cristina and Bayés-Genís, Antoni and Navajas, Daniel and Farre, Ramon and Otero, Jorge
Title Silk-reinforced Collagen Hydrogels with Raised Multiscale Stiffness for Mesenchymal Cells 3D Culture [Abstract]
Year 2020
Journal/Proceedings Tissue Engineering Part A
Reftype
DOI/URL DOI
Abstract
Type I collagen hydrogels are of high interest in tissue engineering. With the evolution of 3D bioprinting technologies, a high number of collagen-based scaffolds have been reported for the development of 3D cell cultures. A recent proposal was to mix collagen with silk fibroin derived from Bombyx Mori silkworm. Nevertheless, due to the difficulties in the preparation and the characteristics of the protein, several problems like phase separation and collagen denaturation appears during the procedure. Therefore, the common solution is to diminish the concentration of collagen although in that way the most biologically relevant component is reduced. In the present work, we present a new, simple and effective method to develop a collagen-silk hybrid hydrogel with high collagen concentration and with increased stiffness approaching that of natural tissues, which could be of high interest for the development of cardiac patches for myocardial regeneration and for preconditioning of mesenchymal stem cells to improve their therapeutic potential. Sericin in the silk was preserved by using a physical solubilizing procedure which results in a preserved fibrous structure of type I collagen, as shown by ultrastructural imaging. The macro- and micromechanical properties of the hybrid hydrogels measured by tensile stretch and Atomic Force Microscopy respectively, showed a more than two-fold stiffening as compared with collagen-only hydrogels. Rheological measurements showed improved printability properties for the developed biomaterial. The suitability of the hydrogels for 3D cell culture was assessed by 3D bioprinting bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells cultured within the scaffolds. The result was a biomaterial with improved printability characteristics that better resembled the mechanical properties of natural soft tissues while preserving biocompatibility owing to the high concentration of collagen.
AUTHOR Schwab, Andrea and Helary, Christophe and Richards, Geoff and Alini, Mauro and Eglin, David and D{textquoteright}Este, Matteo
Title Tissue mimetic hyaluronan bio-ink containing oriented collagen fibers to modulate hMSC spreading and differentiation [Abstract]
Year 2020
Journal/Proceedings bioRxiv
Reftype
DOI/URL URL DOI
Abstract
Biofabrication is providing scientists and clinicians the ability to produce engineered tissues with desired shapes, chemical and biological gradients. Typical resolutions achieved with extrusion-based bioprinting are at the macroscopic level. However, for capturing the fibrillar nature of the extracellular matrix (ECM), it is necessary to arrange ECM components at smaller scales, down to the sub-micron and the molecular level.In this study, we introduce a (bio)ink containing hyaluronan (HA) as tyramine derivative (THA) and collagen (Col). Similarly to other connective tissues, in this (bio)ink Col is present in fibrillar form and HA as viscoelastic space filler. THA was enzymatically crosslinked under mild conditions allowing simultaneous Col fibrillogenesis, thus achieving a homogeneous distribution of Col fibrils within the viscoelastic HA-based matrix. THA-Col composite displayed synergistic properties in terms of storage modulus and shear-thinning, translating into good printability.Shear-induced alignment of the Col fibrils along the printing direction was achieved and quantified via immunofluorescence and second harmonic generation.Cell-free and cell-laden constructs were printed and characterized, analyzing the influence of the controlled microscopic anisotropy on cell behavior and chondrogenic differentiation.THA-Col showed cell instructive properties modulating hMSC adhesion, morphology and sprouting from spheroids stimulated by the presence and the orientation of Col fibers. Actin filament staining showed that hMSCs embedded into aligned constructs displayed increased cytoskeleton alignment along the fibril direction. Based on gene expression of cartilage/bone markers and matrix production, hMSCs embedded into the bioink displayed chondrogenic differentiation comparable or superior to standard pellet culture by means of proteoglycan production (Safranin O staining and proteoglycan quantification) as well as increase in cartilage related genes.The possibility of printing matrix components with control over microscopic alignment brings biofabrication one step closer to capturing the complexity of native tissues.
AUTHOR Shapira, Assaf and Noor, Nadav and Oved, Hadas and Dvir, Tal
Title Transparent support media for high resolution 3D printing of volumetric cell-containing ECM structures [Abstract]
Year 2020
Journal/Proceedings Biomedical Materials
Reftype
DOI/URL DOI
Abstract
3D bioprinting may revolutionize the field of tissue engineering by allowing fabrication of bio-structures with high degree of complexity, fine architecture and heterogeneous composition. The printing substances in these processes are mostly based on biomaterials and living cells. As such, they generally possess weak mechanical properties and thus must be supported during fabrication in order to prevent the collapse of large, volumetric multi-layered printouts. In this work, we characterize a uniquely formulated media used to support printing of extracellular matrix-based biomaterials. We show that a hybrid material, comprised of calcium-alginate nanoparticles and xanthan gum, presents superb qualities that enable printing at high resolution of down to 10 microns, allowing fabrication of complex constructs and cellular structures. This hybrid also presents an exclusive combination of desirable properties such as biocompatibility, high transparency, stability at a wide range of temperatures and amenability to delicate extraction procedures. Moreover, as fabrication of large, volumetric biological structures may require hours and even days to accomplish, we have demonstrated that the hybrid medium can support prolonged, precise printing for at least 18 hours. All these qualities make it a promising support medium for 3D printing of tissues and organs.
AUTHOR Iordache, F. and Alexandru, D. and Pisoschi, A. M. and PoP, A.
Title 3D Bioprinting of Blood Vessel Model Using Collagen-Hyaluronic Acid Hydrogel [Abstract]
Year 2019
Journal/Proceedings AgroLife Scientific Journal
Reftype
DOI/URL URL
Abstract
3D bioprinting is a technology that supports fabrication of biomimetic tissues with complex architecture. It has application in drug discovery, tissue development, and regenerative medicine. The aim of this study was to create a blood vessel model correlating properties of collagen-hyaluronic acid hydrogel with bioprinter parameters such as speed rate, pressure, number of layers, nozzle diameter, and temperature. The blood vessel model was created using BioCAD software and bioprinted by extrusion technology using collagen-hyaluronic acid hydrogel. We analyzed the water uptake, enzymatic degradation and morphology by scanning electron microscopy and after staining with Hematoxylin and Eosin (H&E) and Trichromic Masson dyes. The results showed that the blood vessel constructs have 2.46 mm (±0.41) mean diameter, 1.4 mm (±0.10) mean thick wall, and 2.8 mm (±0.05) mean height which is appropriate with the model created in the BioCAD software. The optimal parameters for these constructs were: 1.1 bar pressure, 1mm/sec speed rate, 18°C temperature, 0.2 mm nozzle diameter, and 10 numbers of layers. Increasing hydrogel weight by 22% at 2 hours after immersion in PBS suggesting that is hydrophilic. Furthermore, decreasing by up to 47.2% in the presence of collagenase (50 μg/ml) shows that is biodegradable. H&E and Trichromic Masson staining showed that collagen-hyaluronic acid hydrogel organized in a network with pores dimension that could support cells growth and differentiation. In conclusion, our scaffold mimics the blood vessel structure, further experiment will be addressed for study the biocompatibility of these scaffold with mesenchymal stem cells.
AUTHOR Marques, C. F. and Diogo, G. S. and Pina, S. and Oliveira, J. M. and Silva, T. H. and Reis, R. L.
Title Collagen-based bioinks for hard tissue engineering applications: a comprehensive review [Abstract]
Year 2019
Journal/Proceedings Journal of Materials Science: Materials in Medicine
Reftype
DOI/URL DOI
Abstract
In the last few years, additive manufacturing (AM) has been gaining great interest in the fabrication of complex structures for soft-to-hard tissues regeneration, with tailored porosity, and boosted structural, mechanical, and biological properties. 3D printing is one of the most known AM techniques in the field of biofabrication of tissues and organs. This technique opened up opportunities over the conventional ones, with the capability of creating replicable, customized, and functional structures that can ultimately promote effectively different tissues regeneration. The uppermost component of 3D printing is the bioink, i.e. a mixture of biomaterials that can also been laden with different cell types, and bioactive molecules. Important factors of the fabrication process include printing fidelity, stability, time, shear-thinning properties, mechanical strength and elasticity, as well as cell encapsulation and cell-compatible conditions. Collagen-based materials have been recognized as a promising choice to accomplish an ideal mimetic bioink for regeneration of several tissues with high cell-activating properties. This review presents the state-of-art of the current achievements on 3D printing using collagen-based materials for hard tissue engineering, particularly on the development of scaffolds for bone and cartilage repair/regeneration. The ultimate aim is to shed light on the requirements to successfully print collagen-based inks and the most relevant properties exhibited by the so fabricated scaffolds. In this regard, the adequate bioprinting parameters are addressed, as well as the main materials properties, namely physicochemical and mechanical properties, cell compatibility and commercial availability, covering hydrogels, microcarriers and decellularized matrix components. Furthermore, the fabrication of these bioinks with and without cells used in inkjet printing, laser-assisted printing, and direct in writing technologies are also overviewed. Finally, some future perspectives of novel bioinks are given.
AUTHOR Filardo, G. and Petretta, M. and Cavallo, C. and Roseti, L. and Durante, S. and Albisinni, U. and Grigolo, B.
Title Patient-specific meniscus prototype based on 3D bioprinting of human cell-laden scaffold [Abstract]
Year 2019
Journal/Proceedings Bone and Joint Research
Reftype
DOI/URL DOI
Abstract
Objectives Meniscal injuries are often associated with an active lifestyle. The damage of meniscal tissue puts young patients at higher risk of undergoing meniscal surgery and, therefore, at higher risk of osteoarthritis. In this study, we undertook proof-of-concept research to develop a cellularized human meniscus by using 3D bioprinting technology. Methods A 3D model of bioengineered medial meniscus tissue was created, based on MRI scans of a human volunteer. The Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) data from these MRI scans were processed using dedicated software, in order to obtain an STL model of the structure. The chosen 3D Discovery printing tool was a microvalve-based inkjet printhead. Primary mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were isolated from bone marrow and embedded in a collagen-based bio-ink before printing. LIVE/DEAD assay was performed on realized cell-laden constructs carrying MSCs in order to evaluate cell distribution and viability. Results This study involved the realization of a human cell-laden collagen meniscus using 3D bioprinting. The meniscus prototype showed the biological potential of this technology to provide an anatomically shaped, patient-specific construct with viable cells on a biocompatible material. Conclusion This paper reports the preliminary findings of the production of a custom-made, cell-laden, collagen-based human meniscus. The prototype described could act as the starting point for future developments of this collagen-based, tissue-engineered structure, which could aid the optimization of implants designed to replace damaged menisci. Cite this article: G. Filardo, M. Petretta, C. Cavallo, L. Roseti, S. Durante, U. Albisinni, B. Grigolo. Patient-specific meniscus prototype based on 3D bioprinting of human cell-laden scaffold. Bone Joint Res 2019;8:101–106. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.82.BJR-2018-0134.R1.
AUTHOR Ng, Wei Long and Goh, Min Hao and Yeong, Wai Yee and Naing, May Win
Title Applying macromolecular crowding to 3D bioprinting: fabrication of 3D hierarchical porous collagen-based hydrogel constructs [Abstract]
Year 2018
Journal/Proceedings Biomaterials Science
Reftype
DOI/URL DOI
Abstract
Native tissues and/or organs possess complex hierarchical porous structures that confer highly-specific cellular functions. Despite advances in fabrication processes{,} it is still very challenging to emulate the hierarchical porous collagen architecture found in most native tissues. Hence{,} the ability to recreate such hierarchical porous structures would result in biomimetic tissue-engineered constructs. Here{,} a single-step drop-on-demand (DOD) bioprinting strategy is proposed to fabricate hierarchical porous collagen-based hydrogels. Printable macromolecule-based bio-inks (polyvinylpyrrolidone{,} PVP) have been developed and printed in a DOD manner to manipulate the porosity within the multi-layered collagen-based hydrogels by altering the collagen fibrillogenesis process. The experimental results have indicated that hierarchical porous collagen structures could be achieved by controlling the number of macromolecule-based bio-ink droplets printed on each printed collagen layer. This facile single-step bioprinting process could be useful for the structural design of collagen-based hydrogels for various tissue engineering applications.
AUTHOR D'Amora, Ugo and D'Este, Matteo and Eglin, David and Safari, Fatemeh and Sprecher, Christoph and Gloria, Antonio and De Santis, Roberto and Alini, Mauro and Ambrosio, Luigi
Title Collagen Density Gradient on 3D Printed Poly(ε-Caprolactone) Scaffolds for Interface Tissue Engineering
Year 2017
Journal/Proceedings Journal of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine
Reftype
DOI/URL DOI
AUTHOR Visscher, Dafydd O. and Bos, Ernst J. and Peeters, Mirte and Kuzmin, Nikolay V. and Groot, Marie Louise and Helder, Marco N. and van Zuijlen, Paul P. M.
Title Cartilage Tissue Engineering: Preventing Tissue Scaffold Contraction Using a 3D-Printed Polymeric Cage. [Abstract]
Year 2016
Journal/Proceedings Tissue engineering Part C: Methods
Reftype
DOI/URL DOI
Abstract
Scaffold contraction is a common but underestimated problem in the field of tissue engineering. It becomes particularly problematic when creating anatomically complex shapes such as the ear. The aim of this study was to develop a contraction-free biocompatible scaffold construct for ear cartilage tissue engineering. To address this aim, we used three constructs: (i) a fibrin/hyaluronic acid (FB/HA) hydrogel, (ii) a FB/HA hydrogel combined with a collagen I/III scaffold, and (iii) a cage construct containing (ii) surrounded by a 3D-printed poly-varepsilon-caprolactone mold. A wide range of different cell types were tested within these constructs, including chondrocytes, perichondrocytes, adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells, and their combinations. After in vitro culturing for 1, 14, and 28 days, all constructs were analyzed. Macroscopic observation showed severe contraction of the cell-seeded hydrogel (i). This could be prevented, in part, by combining the hydrogel with the collagen scaffold (ii) and prevented in total using the 3D-printed cage construct (iii). (Immuno)histological analysis, multiphoton laser scanning microscopy, and biomechanical analysis showed extracellular matrix deposition and increased Young's modulus and thereby the feasibility of ear cartilage engineering. These results demonstrated that the 3D-printed cage construct is an adequate model for contraction-free ear cartilage engineering using a range of cell combinations.
AUTHOR Hou, Xiaochun and Liu, Shiying and Wang, Min and Wiraja, Christian and Huang, Wei and Chan, Peggy and Tan, Timothy and Xu, Chenjie
Title Layer-by-Layer 3D Constructs of Fibroblasts in Hydrogel for Examining Transdermal Penetration Capability of Nanoparticles [Abstract]
Year 2016
Journal/Proceedings Journal of Laboratory Automation
Reftype
DOI/URL URL DOI
Abstract
Nanoparticles are emerging transdermal delivery systems. Their size and surface properties determine their efficacy and efficiency to penetrate through the skin layers. This work utilizes three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting technology to generate a simplified artificial skin model to rapidly screen nanoparticles for their transdermal penetration ability. Specifically, this model is built through layer-by-layer alternate printing of blank collagen hydrogel and fibroblasts. Through controlling valve on-time, the spacing between printing lines could be accurately tuned, which could enable modulation of cell infiltration in the future. To confirm the effectiveness of this platform, a 3D construct with one layer of fibroblasts sandwiched between two layers of collagen hydrogel is used to screen silica nanoparticles with different surface charges for their penetration ability, with positively charged nanoparticles demonstrating deeper penetration, consistent with the observation from an existing study involving living skin tissue.