REGENHU-Switzerland-3d-bioprinting-instrument-bio-3d-bioprinter-DevelopmentTeam-0006

SCIENTIFIC PUBLICATIONS

You are researching: Chondrocytes
Matching entries: 30 /30
All Groups
AUTHOR Daly, Andrew C. and Kelly, Daniel J.
Title Biofabrication of spatially organised tissues by directing the growth of cellular spheroids within 3D printed polymeric microchambers [Abstract]
Year 2019
Journal/Proceedings Biomaterials
Reftype
DOI/URL URL DOI
Abstract
Successful tissue engineering requires the generation of human scale implants that mimic the structure, composition and mechanical properties of native tissues. Here, we report a novel biofabrication strategy that enables the engineering of structurally organised tissues by guiding the growth of cellular spheroids within arrays of 3D printed polymeric microchambers. With the goal of engineering stratified articular cartilage, inkjet bioprinting was used to deposit defined numbers of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) and chondrocytes into pre-printed microchambers. These jetted cell suspensions rapidly underwent condensation within the hydrophobic microchambers, leading to the formation of organised arrays of cellular spheroids. The microchambers were also designed to provide boundary conditions to these spheroids, guiding their growth and eventual fusion, leading to the development of stratified cartilage tissue with a depth-dependant collagen fiber architecture that mimicked the structure of native articular cartilage. Furthermore, the composition and biomechanical properties of the bioprinted cartilage was also comparable to the native tissue. Using multi-tool biofabrication, we were also able to engineer anatomically accurate, human scale, osteochondral templates by printing this microchamber system on top of a hypertrophic cartilage region designed to support endochondral bone formation and then maintaining the entire construct in long-term bioreactor culture to enhance tissue development. This bioprinting strategy provides a versatile and scalable approach to engineer structurally organised cartilage tissues for joint resurfacing applications.
AUTHOR Kessel, Benjamin and Lee, Mihyun and Bonato, Angela and Tinguely, Yann and Tosoratti, Enrico and Zenobi-Wong, Marcy
Title 3D Bioprinting of Macroporous Materials Based on Entangled Hydrogel Microstrands [Abstract]
Year 2020
Journal/Proceedings Advanced Science
Reftype
DOI/URL DOI
Abstract
Abstract Hydrogels are excellent mimetics of mammalian extracellular matrices and have found widespread use in tissue engineering. Nanoporosity of monolithic bulk hydrogels, however, limits mass transport of key biomolecules. Microgels used in 3D bioprinting achieve both custom shape and vastly improved permissivity to an array of cell functions, however spherical-microbead-based bioinks are challenging to upscale, are inherently isotropic, and require secondary crosslinking. Here, bioinks based on high-aspect-ratio hydrogel microstrands are introduced to overcome these limitations. Pre-crosslinked, bulk hydrogels are deconstructed into microstrands by sizing through a grid with apertures of 40–100 µm. The microstrands are moldable and form a porous, entangled structure, stable in aqueous medium without further crosslinking. Entangled microstrands have rheological properties characteristic of excellent bioinks for extrusion bioprinting. Furthermore, individual microstrands align during extrusion and facilitate the alignment of myotubes. Cells can be placed either inside or outside the hydrogel phase with >90% viability. Chondrocytes co-printed with the microstrands deposit abundant extracellular matrix, resulting in a modulus increase from 2.7 to 780.2 kPa after 6 weeks of culture. This powerful approach to deconstruct bulk hydrogels into advanced bioinks is both scalable and versatile, representing an important toolbox for 3D bioprinting of architected hydrogels.
AUTHOR Fisch, Philipp and Broguiere, Nicolas and Finkielsztein, Sergio and Linder, Thomas and Zenobi-Wong, Marcy
Title Bioprinting of Cartilaginous Auricular Constructs Utilizing an Enzymatically Crosslinkable Bioink [Abstract]
Year 2021
Journal/Proceedings Advanced Functional Materials
Reftype
DOI/URL DOI
Abstract
Abstract Bioprinting of functional tissues could overcome tissue shortages and allow a more rapid response for treatments. However, despite recent progress in bioprinting, and its outstanding ability to position cells and biomaterials in a precise 3D manner, its success has been limited, due to insufficient maturation of constructs into functional tissue. Here, a novel calcium-triggered enzymatic crosslinking (CTEC) mechanism for bioinks based on the activation cascade of Factor XIII is presented and utilized for the biofabrication of cartilaginous constructs. Hyaluronan transglutaminase (HA-TG), an enzymatically crosslinkable material, has shown excellent characteristics for chondrogenesis and builds the basis of the CTEC bioink. The bioink supports tissue maturation with neocartilage formation and stiffening of constructs up to 400 kPa. Bioprinted constructs remain stable in vivo for 24 weeks and bioprinted auricular constructs transform into cartilaginous grafts. A major limitation of the current study is the deposition of collagen I, indicating the maturation toward fibrocartilage rather than elastic cartilage. Shifting the maturation process toward elastic cartilage will therefore be essential in order for the developed bioinks to offer a novel tissue engineered treatment for microtia patients. CTEC bioprinting furthermore opens up use of enzymatically crosslinkable biopolymers and their modularity to support a multitude of tissues.
AUTHOR De Moor, Lise and Minne, Mendy and Tytgat, Liesbeth and Vercruysse, Chris and Dubruel, Peter and Van Vlierberghe, Sandra and Declercq, Heidi
Title Tuning the Phenotype of Cartilage Tissue Mimics by Varying Spheroid Maturation and Methacrylamide-Modified Gelatin Hydrogel Characteristics [Abstract]
Year 2021
Journal/Proceedings Macromolecular Bioscience
Reftype
DOI/URL DOI
Abstract
Abstract In hybrid bioprinting of cartilage tissue constructs, spheroids are used as cellular building blocks and combined with biomaterials for dispensing. However, biomaterial intrinsic cues can deeply affect cell fate and to date, the influence of hydrogel encapsulation on spheroid viability and phenotype has received limited attention. This study assesses this need and unravels 1) how the phenotype of spheroid-laden constructs can be tuned through adjusting the hydrogel physico–chemical properties and 2) if the spheroid maturation stage prior to encapsulation is a determining factor for the construct phenotype. Articular chondrocyte spheroids with a cartilage specific extracellular matrix (ECM) are generated and different maturation stages, early-, mid-, and late-stage (3, 7, and 14 days, respectively), are harvested and encapsulated in 10, 15, or 20 w/v% methacrylamide-modified gelatin (gelMA) for 14 days. The encapsulation of immature spheroids do not lead to a cartilage-like ECM production but when more mature mid- or late-stage spheroids are combined with a certain concentration of gelMA, a fibrocartilage-like as well as a hyaline cartilage-like phenotype can be induced. As a proof of concept, late-stage spheroids are bioprinted using a 10 w/v% gelMA–Irgacure 2959 solution with the aim to test the processing potential of the spheroid-laden bioink.
AUTHOR Critchley, Susan and Sheehy, Eamon J. and Cunniffe, Gráinne and Diaz-Payno, Pedro and Carroll, Simon F. and Jeon, Oju and Alsberg, Eben and Brama, Pieter A. J. and Kelly, Daniel J.
Title 3D printing of fibre-reinforced cartilaginous templates for the regeneration of osteochondral defects [Abstract]
Year 2020
Journal/Proceedings Acta Biomaterialia
Reftype
DOI/URL URL DOI
Abstract
Successful osteochondral defect repair requires regenerating the subchondral bone whilst simultaneously promoting the development of an overlying layer of articular cartilage that is resistant to vascularization and endochondral ossification. During skeletal development articular cartilage also functions as a surface growth plate, which postnatally is replaced by a more spatially complex bone-cartilage interface. Motivated by this developmental process, the hypothesis of this study is that bi-phasic, fibre-reinforced cartilaginous templates can regenerate both the articular cartilage and subchondral bone within osteochondral defects created in caprine joints. To engineer mechanically competent implants, we first compared a range of 3D printed fibre networks (PCL, PLA and PLGA) for their capacity to mechanically reinforce alginate hydrogels whilst simultaneously supporting mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) chondrogenesis in vitro. These mechanically reinforced, MSC-laden alginate hydrogels were then used to engineer the endochondral bone forming phase of bi-phasic osteochondral constructs, with the overlying chondral phase consisting of cartilage tissue engineered using a co-culture of infrapatellar fat pad derived stem/stromal cells (FPSCs) and chondrocytes. Following chondrogenic priming and subcutaneous implantation in nude mice, these bi-phasic cartilaginous constructs were found to support the development of vascularised endochondral bone overlaid by phenotypically stable cartilage. These fibre-reinforced, bi-phasic cartilaginous templates were then evaluated in clinically relevant, large animal (caprine) model of osteochondral defect repair. Although the quality of repair was variable from animal-to-animal, in general more hyaline-like cartilage repair was observed after 6 months in animals treated with bi-phasic constructs compared to animals treated with commercial control scaffolds. This variability in the quality of repair points to the need for further improvements in the design of 3D bioprinted implants for joint regeneration. Statement of Significance Successful osteochondral defect repair requires regenerating the subchondral bone whilst simultaneously promoting the development of an overlying layer of articular cartilage. In this study, we hypothesised that bi-phasic, fibre-reinforced cartilaginous templates could be leveraged to regenerate both the articular cartilage and subchondral bone within osteochondral defects. To this end we used 3D printed fibre networks to mechanically reinforce engineered transient cartilage, which also contained an overlying layer of phenotypically stable cartilage engineered using a co-culture of chondrocytes and stem cells. When chondrogenically primed and implanted into caprine osteochondral defects, these fibre-reinforced bi-phasic cartilaginous grafts were shown to spatially direct tissue development during joint repair. Such developmentally inspired tissue engineering strategies, enabled by advances in biofabrication and 3D printing, could form the basis of new classes of regenerative implants in orthopaedic medicine.
AUTHOR Moxon, Sam and Ferreira, Miguel and Santos, Patricia and Popa, Bogdan and Gloria, Antonio and Katsarava, Ramaz and Tugushi, David and Serra, Armenio and Hooper, Nigel and Kimber, Susan and Fonseca, Ana and Domingos, Marco
Title A Preliminary Evaluation of the Pro-Chondrogenic Potential of 3D-Bioprinted Poly(ester Urea) Scaffolds
Year 2020
Journal/Proceedings Polymers
Reftype
DOI/URL DOI
AUTHOR Li, Zuxi and Zhang, Xiao and Yuan, Tao and Zhang, Yi and Luo, Chunyang and Zhang, Jiyong and Liu, Yang and Fan, Weimin
Title Addition of Platelet-Rich Plasma to Silk Fibroin Hydrogel Bioprinting for Cartilage Regeneration [Abstract]
Year 2020
Journal/Proceedings Tissue Engineering Part A
Reftype
DOI/URL DOI
Abstract
The recent advent of 3D bioprinting of biopolymers provides a novel method for fabrication of tissue-engineered scaffolds and also offers a potentially promising avenue in cartilage regeneration. Silk fibroin (SF) is one of the most popular biopolymers used for 3D bioprinting, but further application of SF is hindered by its limited biological activities. Incorporation of growth factors (GFs) has been identified as a solution to improve biological function. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is an autologous resource of GFs, which has been widely used in clinic. In this study, we have developed SF-based bioinks incorporated with different concentrations of PRP (12.5%, 25%, and 50%; vol/vol). Release kinetic studies show that SF-PRP bioinks could achieve controlled release of GFs. Subsequently, SF-PRP bioinks were successfully fabricated into scaffolds by bioprinting. Our results revealed that SF-PRP scaffolds possessed proper internal pore structure, good biomechanical properties, and a suitable degradation rate for cartilage regeneration. Live/dead staining showed that 3D, printed SF-PRP scaffolds were biocompatible. Moreover, in vitro studies revealed that tissue-engineered cartilage from the SF-PRP group exhibited improved qualities compared with the pure SF controls, according to histological and immunohistochemical findings. Biochemical evaluations confirmed that SF-PRP (50% PRP, v/v) scaffolds allowed the largest increases in collagen and glycosaminoglycan concentrations, when compared with the pure SF group. These findings suggest that 3D, printed SF-PRP scaffolds could be potential candidates for cartilage tissue engineering.
AUTHOR Fisch, Philipp and Holub, Martin and Zenobi-Wong, Marcy
Title Improved accuracy and precision of bioprinting through progressive cavity pump-controlled extrusion [Abstract]
Year 2020
Journal/Proceedings bioRxiv
Reftype
DOI/URL URL DOI
Abstract
3D bioprinting has seen a tremendous growth in recent years in a variety of fields such as tissue and organ models, drug testing and regenerative medicine. This growth has led researchers and manufacturers to continuously advance and develop novel bioprinting techniques and materials. Although new bioprinting methods are emerging (e.g. contactless and volumetric bioprinting), micro-extrusion bioprinting remains the most widely used method. Micro-extrusion bioprinting, however, is still largely dependent on the conventional pneumatic extrusion process, which relies heavily on homogenous biomaterial inks and bioinks to maintain a constant material flowrate. Augmenting the functionality of the bioink with the addition of nanoparticles, cells or biopolymers can induce inhomogeneities resulting in uneven material flow during printing and/or clogging of the nozzle, leading to defects in the printed construct. In this work, we evaluated a novel extrusion technique based on a miniaturized progressive cavity pump. We compared the accuracy and precision of this system to the pneumatic extrusion system and tested both for their effect on cell viability after extrusion. The progressive cavity pump achieved a significantly higher accuracy and precision compared to the pneumatic system while maintaining good viability and was able to maintain its reliability independently of the bioink composition, printing speed or nozzle size. Progressive cavity pumps are a promising tool for bioprinting and could help provide standardized and validated bioprinted constructs while leaving the researcher more freedom in the design of the bioinks with increased functionality.
AUTHOR Ruiz-Cantu, Laura and Gleadall, Andrew and Faris, Callum and Segal, Joel and Shakesheff, Kevin and Yang, Jing
Title Multi-material 3D bioprinting of porous constructs for cartilage regeneration [Abstract]
Year 2020
Journal/Proceedings Materials Science and Engineering: C
Reftype
DOI/URL URL DOI
Abstract
The current gold standard for nasal reconstruction after rhinectomy or severe trauma includes transposition of autologous cartilage grafts in conjunction with coverage using an autologous skin flap. Harvesting autologous cartilage requires a major additional procedure that may create donor site morbidity. Major nasal reconstruction also requires sculpting autologous cartilages to form a cartilage framework, which is complex, highly skill-demanding and very time consuming. These limitations have prompted facial reconstructive surgeons to explore different techniques such as tissue engineered cartilage. This work explores the use of multi-material 3D bioprinting with chondrocyte-laden gelatin methacrylate (GelMA) and polycaprolactone (PCL) to fabricate constructs that can potentially be used for nasal reconstruction. In this study, we have investigated the effect of 3D manufacturing parameters including temperature, needle gauge, UV exposure time, and cell carrier formulation (GelMA) on the viability and functionality of chondrocytes in bioprinted constructs. Furthermore, we printed chondrocyte-laden GelMA and PCL into composite constructs to combine biological and mechanical properties. It was found that 20% w/v GelMA was the best concentration for the 3D bioprinting of the chondrocytes without comprising the scaffold's porous structure and cell functionality. In addition, the 3D bioprinted constructs showed neocartilage formation and similar mechanical properties to nasal alar cartilage after a 50-day culture period. Neocartilage formation was also observed in the composite constructs evidenced by the presence of glycosaminoglycans and collagen type II. This study shows the feasibility of manufacturing neocartilage using chondrocytes/GelMA/PCL 3D bioprinted porous constructs which could be applied as a method for fabricating implants for nose reconstruction.
AUTHOR Lee, Mihyun and Bae, Kraun and Levinson, Clara and Zenobi-Wong, Marcy
Title Nanocomposite bioink exploits dynamic covalent bonds between nanoparticles and polysaccharides for precision bioprinting [Abstract]
Year 2020
Journal/Proceedings Biofabrication
Reftype
DOI/URL DOI
Abstract
The field of bioprinting has made significant recent progress towards engineering tissues with increasing complexity and functionality. It remains challenging, however, to develop bioinks with optimal biocompatibility and good printing fidelity. Here, we demonstrate enhanced printability of a polymer-based bioink based on dynamic covalent linkages between nanoparticles (NPs) and polymers, which retains good biocompatibility. Amine-presenting silica NPs (ca. 45 nm) were added to a polymeric ink containing oxidized alginate (OxA). The formation of reversible imine bonds between amines on the NPs and aldehydes of OxA lead to significantly improved rheological properties and high printing fidelity. In particular, the yield stress increased with increasing amounts of NPs (14.5 Pa without NPs, 79 Pa with 2 wt% NPs). In addition, the presence of dynamic covalent linkages in the gel provided improved mechanical stability over 7 d compared to ionically crosslinked gels. The nanocomposite ink retained high printability and mechanical strength, resulting in generation of centimeter-scale porous constructs and an ear structure with overhangs and high structural fidelity. Furthermore, the nanocomposite ink supported both in vitro and in vivo maturation of bioprinted gels containing chondrocytes. This approach based on simple oxidation can be applied to any polysaccharide, thus the widely applicability of the method is expected to advance the field towards the goal of precision bioprinting.
AUTHOR Schipani, Rossana and Scheurer, Stefan and Florentin, Romain and Critchley, Susan E. and Kelly, Daniel John
Title Reinforcing interpenetrating network hydrogels with 3D printed polymer networks to engineer cartilage mimetic composites [Abstract]
Year 2020
Journal/Proceedings Biofabrication
Reftype
DOI/URL DOI
Abstract
Engineering constructs that mimic the complex structure, composition and biomechanics of the articular cartilage represents a promising route to joint regeneration. Such tissue engineering strategies require the development of biomaterials that mimic the mechanical properties of articular cartilage whilst simultaneously providing an environment supportive of chondrogenesis. Here three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting is used to develop polycaprolactone (PCL) fibre networks to mechanically reinforce interpenetrating network (IPN) hydrogels consisting of alginate and gelatin methacryloyl (GelMA). Inspired by the significant tension-compression nonlinearity of the collagen network in articular cartilage, we printed reinforcing PCL networks with different ratios of tensile to compressive modulus. Synergistic increases in compressive modulus were observed when IPN hydrogels were reinforced with PCL networks that were relatively soft in compression and stiff in tension. The resulting composites possessed equilibrium and dynamic mechanical properties that matched or approached that of native articular cartilage. Finite Element (FE) modelling revealed that the reinforcement of IPN hydrogels with specific PCL networks limited radial expansion and increased the hydrostatic pressure generated within the IPN upon the application of compressive loading. Next, multiple-tool biofabrication techniques were used to 3D bioprint PCL reinforced IPN hydrogels laden with a co-culture of bone marrow-derived stromal cells (BMSCs) and chondrocytes (CCs). The bioprinted biomimetic composites were found to support robust chondrogenesis, with encapsulated cells producing hyaline-like cartilage that stained strongly for sGAG and type II collagen deposition, and negatively for type X collagen and calcium deposition. Taken together, these results demonstrate how 3D bioprinting can be used to engineer constructs that are both pro-chondrogenic and biomimetic of the mechanical properties of articular cartilage.
AUTHOR Apelgren, Peter and Karabulut, Erdem and Amoroso, Matteo and Mantas, Athanasios and Martínez Ávila, Héctor and Kölby, Lars and Kondo, Tetsuo and Toriz, Guillermo and Gatenholm, Paul
Title In Vivo Human Cartilage Formation in Three-Dimensional Bioprinted Constructs with a Novel Bacterial Nanocellulose Bioink [Abstract]
Year 2019
Journal/Proceedings ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering
Reftype
DOI/URL DOI
Abstract
Bacterial nanocellulose (BNC) is a 3D network of nanofibrils exhibiting excellent biocompatibility. Here, we present the aqueous counter collision (ACC) method of BNC disassembly to create bioink with suitable properties for cartilage-specific 3D-bioprinting. BNC was disentangled by ACC, and fibril characteristics were analyzed. Bioink printing fidelity and shear-thinning properties were evaluated. Cell-laden bioprinted grid constructs (5 × 5 × 1 mm3) containing human nasal chondrocytes (10 M mL-1) were implanted in nude mice and explanted after 30 and 60 days. Both ACC and hydrolysis resulted in significantly reduced fiber lengths, with ACC resulting in longer fibrils and fewer negative charges relative to hydrolysis. Moreover, ACC-BNC bioink showed outstanding printability, postprinting mechanical stability, and structural integrity. In vivo, cell-laden structures were rapidly integrated, maintained structural integrity, and showed chondrocyte proliferation, with 32.8 ± 13.8 cells per mm2 observed after 30 days and 85.6 ± 30.0 cells per mm2 at day 60 (p = 0.002). Furthermore, a full-thickness skin graft was attached and integrated completely on top of the 3D-bioprinted construct. The novel ACC disentanglement technique makes BNC biomaterial highly suitable for 3D-bioprinting and clinical translation, suggesting cell-laden 3D-bioprinted ACC-BNC as a promising solution for cartilage repair. Bacterial nanocellulose (BNC) is a 3D network of nanofibrils exhibiting excellent biocompatibility. Here, we present the aqueous counter collision (ACC) method of BNC disassembly to create bioink with suitable properties for cartilage-specific 3D-bioprinting. BNC was disentangled by ACC, and fibril characteristics were analyzed. Bioink printing fidelity and shear-thinning properties were evaluated. Cell-laden bioprinted grid constructs (5 × 5 × 1 mm3) containing human nasal chondrocytes (10 M mL-1) were implanted in nude mice and explanted after 30 and 60 days. Both ACC and hydrolysis resulted in significantly reduced fiber lengths, with ACC resulting in longer fibrils and fewer negative charges relative to hydrolysis. Moreover, ACC-BNC bioink showed outstanding printability, postprinting mechanical stability, and structural integrity. In vivo, cell-laden structures were rapidly integrated, maintained structural integrity, and showed chondrocyte proliferation, with 32.8 ± 13.8 cells per mm2 observed after 30 days and 85.6 ± 30.0 cells per mm2 at day 60 (p = 0.002). Furthermore, a full-thickness skin graft was attached and integrated completely on top of the 3D-bioprinted construct. The novel ACC disentanglement technique makes BNC biomaterial highly suitable for 3D-bioprinting and clinical translation, suggesting cell-laden 3D-bioprinted ACC-BNC as a promising solution for cartilage repair.
AUTHOR Petta, D. and Armiento, A. R. and Grijpma, D. and Alini, M. and Eglin, D. and D'Este, M.
Title 3D bioprinting of a hyaluronan bioink through enzymatic-and visible light-crosslinking [Abstract]
Year 2018
Journal/Proceedings Biofabrication
Reftype
DOI/URL DOI
Abstract
Extrusion-based three-dimensional bioprinting relies on bioinks engineered to combine viscoelastic properties for extrusion and shape retention, and biological properties for cytocompatibility and tissue regeneration. To satisfy these conflicting requirements, bioinks often utilize either complex mixtures or complex modifications of biopolymers. In this paper we introduce and characterize a bioink exploiting a dual crosslinking mechanism, where an enzymatic reaction forms a soft gel suitable for cell encapsulation and extrusion, while a visible light photo-crosslinking allows shape retention of the printed construct. The influence of cell density and cell type on the rheological and printability properties was assessed correlating the printing outcomes with the damping factor, a rheological characteristic independent of the printing system. Stem cells, chondrocytes and fibroblasts were encapsulated, and their viability was assessed up to 14 days with live/dead, alamar blue and trypan blue assays. Additionally, the impact of the printing parameters on cell viability was investigated. Owing to its straightforward preparation, low modification, presence of two independent crosslinking mechanisms for tuning shear-thinning independently of the final shape fixation, the use of visible green instead of UV light, the possibility of encapsulating and sustaining the viability of different cell types, the hyaluronan bioink here presented is a valid biofabrication tool for producing 3D printed tissue-engineered constructs.
AUTHOR Mouser, Vivian H. M. and Levato, Riccardo and Mensinga, Anneloes and Dhert, Wouter J. A. and Gawlitta, Debby and Malda, Jos
Title Bio-ink development for three-dimensional bioprinting of hetero-cellular cartilage constructs [Abstract]
Year 2018
Journal/Proceedings Connective Tissue Research
Reftype
DOI/URL DOI
Abstract
ABSTRACTBioprinting is a promising tool to fabricate organized cartilage. This study aimed to investigate the printability of gelatin-methacryloyl/gellan gum (gelMA/gellan) hydrogels with and without methacrylated hyaluronic acid (HAMA), and to explore (zone-specific) chondrogenesis of chondrocytes, articular cartilage progenitor cells (ACPCs), and multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) embedded in these bio-inks.The incorporating of HAMA in gelMA/gellan bio-ink increased filament stability, as measured using a filament collapse assay, but did not influence (zone-specific) chondrogenesis of any of the cell types. Highest chondrogenic potential was observed for MSCs, followed by ACPCs, which displayed relatively high proteoglycan IV mRNA levels. Therefore, two-zone constructs were printed with gelMA/gellan/HAMA containing ACPCs in the superficial region and MSCs in the middle/deep region. Chondrogenic differentiation was confirmed, however, printing influence cellular differentiation.ACPC- and MSC-laden gelMA/gellan/HAMA hydrogels are of interest for the fabrication of cartilage constructs. Nevertheless, this study underscores the need for careful evaluation of the effects of printing on cellular differentiation.
AUTHOR Visscher, D. O. and Gleadall, A. and Buskermolen, J. K. and Burla, F. and Segal, J. and Koenderink, G. H. and Helder, M. N. and van Zuijlen, P. P. M.
Title Design and fabrication of a hybrid alginate hydrogel/poly(ε-caprolactone) mold for auricular cartilage reconstruction [Abstract]
Year 2018
Journal/Proceedings Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B: Applied Biomaterials
Reftype
DOI/URL DOI
Abstract
Abstract The aim of this study was to design and manufacture an easily assembled cartilage implant model for auricular reconstruction. First, the printing accuracy and mechanical properties of 3D-printed poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL) scaffolds with varying porosities were determined to assess overall material properties. Next, the applicability of alginate as cell carrier for the cartilage implant model was determined. Using the optimal outcomes of both experiments (in terms of (bio)mechanical properties, cell survival, neocartilage formation, and printing accuracy), a hybrid auricular implant model was developed. PCL scaffolds with 600 μm distances between strands exhibited the best mechanical properties and most optimal printing quality for further exploration. In alginate, chondrocytes displayed high cell survival (~83% after 21 days) and produced cartilage-like matrix in vitro. Alginate beads cultured in proliferation medium exhibited slightly higher compressive moduli (6 kPa) compared to beads cultured in chondrogenic medium (3.5 kPa, p > .05). The final auricular mold could be printed with 300 μm pores and high fidelity, and the injected chondrocytes survived the culture period of 21 days. The presented hybrid auricular mold appears to be an adequate model for cartilage tissue engineering and may provide a novel approach to auricular cartilage regeneration for facial reconstruction. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res B Part B: Appl Biomater, 2018.
AUTHOR Lee, Mihyun and Bae, Kraun and Guillon, Pierre and Chang, Jin and Arlov, Øystein and Zenobi-Wong, Marcy
Title Exploitation of Cationic Silica Nanoparticles for Bioprinting of Large-Scale Constructs with High Printing Fidelity [Abstract]
Year 2018
Journal/Proceedings ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces
Reftype
DOI/URL DOI
Abstract
Three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting allows the fabrication of 3D structures containing living cells whose 3D shape and architecture are matched to a patient. The feature is desirable to achieve personalized treatment of trauma or diseases. However, realization of this promising technique in the clinic is greatly hindered by inferior mechanical properties of most biocompatible bioink materials. Here, we report a novel strategy to achieve printing large constructs with high printing quality and fidelity using an extrusion-based printer. We incorporate cationic nanoparticles in an anionic polymer mixture, which significantly improves mechanical properties, printability, and printing fidelity of the polymeric bioink due to electrostatic interactions between the nanoparticles and polymers. Addition of cationic-modified silica nanoparticles to an anionic polymer mixture composed of alginate and gellan gum results in significantly increased zero-shear viscosity (1062%) as well as storage modulus (486%). As a result, it is possible to print a large (centimeter-scale) porous structure with high printing quality, whereas the use of the polymeric ink without the nanoparticles leads to collapse of the printed structure during printing. We demonstrate such a mechanical enhancement is achieved by adding nanoparticles within a certain size range (90%) and extracellular matrix secretion are observed for cells printed with nanocomposite inks. The design principle demonstrated can be applied for various anionic polymer-based systems, which could lead to achievement of 3D bioprinting-based personalized treatment.
AUTHOR Mouser, V. H. M. and Abbadessa, A. and Levato, R. and Hennink, W. E. and Vermonden, T. and Gawlitta, D. and Malda, J.
Title Development of a thermosensitive HAMA-containing bio-ink for the fabrication of composite cartilage repair constructs [Abstract]
Year 2017
Journal/Proceedings Biofabrication
Reftype
DOI/URL URL
Abstract
Fine-tuning of bio-ink composition and material processing parameters is crucial for the development of biomechanically relevant cartilage constructs. This study aims to design and develop cartilage constructs with tunable internal architectures and relevant mechanical properties. More specifically, the potential of methacrylated hyaluronic acid (HAMA) added to thermosensitive hydrogels composed of methacrylated poly[ N -(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide mono/dilactate] (pHPMA-lac)/polyethylene glycol (PEG) triblock copolymers, to optimize cartilage-like tissue formation by embedded chondrocytes, and enhance printability was explored. Additionally, co-printing with polycaprolactone (PCL) was performed for mechanical reinforcement. Chondrocyte-laden hydrogels composed of pHPMA-lac-PEG and different concentrations of HAMA (0%–1% w/w) were cultured for 28 d in vitro and subsequently evaluated for the presence of cartilage-like matrix. Young’s moduli were determined for hydrogels with the different HAMA concentrations. Additionally, hydrogel/PCL constructs with different internal architectures were co-printed and analyzed for their mechanical properties. The results of this study demonstrated a dose-dependent effect of HAMA concentration on cartilage matrix synthesis by chondrocytes. Glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and collagen type II content increased with intermediate HAMA concentrations (0.25%–0.5%) compared to HAMA-free controls, while a relatively high HAMA concentration (1%) resulted in increased fibrocartilage formation. Young’s moduli of generated hydrogel constructs ranged from 14 to 31 kPa and increased with increasing HAMA concentration. The pHPMA-lac-PEG hydrogels with 0.5% HAMA were found to be optimal for cartilage-like tissue formation. Therefore, this hydrogel system was co-printed with PCL to generate porous or solid constructs with different mesh sizes. Young’s moduli of these composite constructs were in the range of native cartilage (3.5–4.6 MPa). Interestingly, the co-printing procedure influenced the mechanical properties of the final constructs. These findings are relevant for future bio-ink development, as they demonstrate the importance of selecting proper HAMA concentrations, as well as appropriate print settings and construct designs for optimal cartilage matrix deposition and final mechanical properties of constructs, respectively.
AUTHOR Bertlein, Sarah and Brown, Gabriella and Lim, Khoon and Jungst, Tomasz and Boeck, Thomas and Blunk, Torsten and Tessmar, Joerg and J. Hooper, Gary and Woodfield, Tim and Groll, Jürgen
Title Thiol-Ene Clickable Gelatin: A Platform Bioink for Multiple 3D Biofabrication Technologies [Abstract]
Year 2017
Journal/Proceedings Advanced Materials
Reftype
DOI/URL DOI
Abstract
Bioprinting can be defined as the art of combining materials and cells to fabricate designed, hierarchical 3D hybrid constructs. Suitable materials, so called bioinks, have to comply with challenging rheological processing demands and rapidly form a stable hydrogel postprinting in a cytocompatible manner. Gelatin is often adopted for this purpose, usually modified with (meth-)acryloyl functionalities for postfabrication curing by free radical photopolymerization, resulting in a hydrogel that is cross-linked via nondegradable polymer chains of uncontrolled length. The application of allylated gelatin (GelAGE) as a thiol-ene clickable bioink for distinct biofabrication applications is reported. Curing of this system occurs via dimerization and yields a network with flexible properties that offer a wider biofabrication window than (meth-)acryloyl chemistry, and without additional nondegradable components. An in-depth analysis of GelAGE synthesis is conducted, and standard UV-initiation is further compared with a recently described visible-light-initiator system for GelAGE hydrogel formation. It is demonstrated that GelAGE may serve as a platform bioink for several biofabrication technologies by fabricating constructs with high shape fidelity via lithography-based (digital light processing) 3D printing and extrusion-based 3D bioprinting, the latter supporting long-term viability postprinting of encapsulated chondrocytes.
AUTHOR {{'{A}}}vila, H{'{e}}ctor Mart{'{i}}nez and Schwarz, Silke and Rotter, Nicole and Gatenholm, Paul
Title 3D bioprinting of human chondrocyte-laden nanocellulose hydrogels for patient-specific auricular cartilage regeneration [Abstract]
Year 2016
Journal/Proceedings Bioprinting
Reftype
DOI/URL URL DOI
Abstract
Abstract Auricular cartilage tissue engineering (TE) aims to provide an effective treatment for patients with acquired or congenital auricular defects. Bioprinting has gained attention in several {TE} strategies for its ability to spatially control the placement of cells, biomaterials and biological molecules. Although considerable advances have been made to bioprint complex 3D tissue analogues, the development of hydrogel bioinks with good printability and bioactive properties must improve in order to advance the translation of 3D bioprinting into the clinic. In this study, the biological functionality of a bioink composed of nanofibrillated cellulose and alginate (NFC-A) is extensively evaluated for auricular cartilage TE. 3D bioprinted auricular constructs laden with human nasal chondrocytes (hNC) are cultured for up to 28 days and the redifferentiation capacity of hNCs in NFC-A is studied on gene expression as well as on protein levels. 3D bioprinting with NFC-A bioink facilitates the biofabrication of cell-laden, patient-specific auricular constructs with an open inner structure, high cell density and homogenous cell distribution. The cell-laden NFC-A constructs exhibit an excellent shape and size stability as well as an increase in cell viability and proliferation during in vitro culture. Furthermore, NFC-A bioink supports the redifferentiation of hNCs and neo-synthesis of cartilage-specific extracellular matrix components. This demonstrated that NFC-A bioink supports redifferentiation of hNCs while offering proper printability in a biologically relevant aqueous 3D environment, making it a promising tool for auricular cartilage {TE} and many other biomedical applications.
AUTHOR Abbadessa, Anna and Mouser, Vivian H. M. and Blokzijl, Maarten M. and Gawlitta, Debby and Dhert, Wouter J. A. and Hennink, Wim E. and Malda, Jos and Vermonden, Tina
Title A Synthetic Thermosensitive Hydrogel for Cartilage Bioprinting and Its Biofunctionalization with Polysaccharides [Abstract]
Year 2016
Journal/Proceedings Biomacromolecules
Reftype
DOI/URL DOI
Abstract
Hydrogels based on triblock copolymers of polyethylene glycol and partially methacrylated poly[N-(2-hydroxypropyl) methacrylamide mono/dilactate] make up an attractive class of biomaterials because of their biodegradability, cytocompatibility, and tunable thermoresponsive and mechanical properties. If these properties are fine-tuned, the hydrogels can be three-dimensionally bioprinted, to generate, for instance, constructs for cartilage repair. This study investigated whether hydrogels based on the polymer mentioned above with a 10% degree of methacrylation (M10P10) support cartilage formation by chondrocytes and whether the incorporation of methacrylated chondroitin sulfate (CSMA) or methacrylated hyaluronic acid (HAMA) can improve the mechanical properties, long-term stability, and printability. Chondrocyte-laden M10P10 hydrogels were cultured for 42 days to evaluate chondrogenesis. M10P10 hydrogels with or without polysaccharides were evaluated for their mechanical properties (before and after UV photo-cross-linking), degradation kinetics, and printability. Extensive cartilage matrix production occurred in M10P10 hydrogels, highlighting their potential for cartilage repair strategies. The incorporation of polysaccharides increased the storage modulus of polymer mixtures and decreased the degradation kinetics in cross-linked hydrogels. Addition of HAMA to M10P10 hydrogels improved printability and resulted in three-dimensional constructs with excellent cell viability. Hence, this novel combination of M10P10 with HAMA forms an interesting class of hydrogels for cartilage bioprinting.
AUTHOR Abbadessa, A. and Blokzijl, M. M. and Mouser, V. H. M. and Marica, P. and Malda, J. and Hennink, W. E. and Vermonden, T.
Title A thermo-responsive and photo-polymerizable chondroitin sulfate-based hydrogel for 3D printing applications [Abstract]
Year 2016
Journal/Proceedings Carbohydrate Polymers
Reftype
DOI/URL URL DOI
Abstract
Abstract The aim of this study was to design a hydrogel system based on methacrylated chondroitin sulfate (CSMA) and a thermo-sensitive poly(N-(2-hydroxypropyl) methacrylamide-mono/dilactate)-polyethylene glycol triblock copolymer (M15P10) as a suitable material for additive manufacturing of scaffolds. {CSMA} was synthesized by reaction of chondroitin sulfate with glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) in dimethylsulfoxide at 50 °C and its degree of methacrylation was tunable up to 48.5%, by changing reaction time and {GMA} feed. Unlike polymer solutions composed of {CSMA} alone (20% w/w), mixtures based on 2% w/w of {CSMA} and 18% of {M15P10} showed strain-softening, thermo-sensitive and shear-thinning properties more pronounced than those found for polymer solutions based on {M15P10} alone. Additionally, they displayed a yield stress of 19.2 ± 7.0 Pa. The 3D printing of this hydrogel resulted in the generation of constructs with tailorable porosity and good handling properties. Finally, embedded chondrogenic cells remained viable and proliferating over a culture period of 6 days. The hydrogel described herein represents a promising biomaterial for cartilage 3D printing applications.
AUTHOR M{"u}ller, Michael and {"O}zt{"u}rk, Ece and Arlov, {O}ystein and Gatenholm, Paul and Zenobi-Wong, Marcy
Title Alginate Sulfate--Nanocellulose Bioinks for Cartilage Bioprinting Applications [Abstract]
Year 2016
Journal/Proceedings Annals of Biomedical Engineering
Reftype
DOI/URL DOI
Abstract
One of the challenges of bioprinting is to identify bioinks which support cell growth, tissue maturation, and ultimately the formation of functional grafts for use in regenerative medicine. The influence of this new biofabrication technology on biology of living cells, however, is still being evaluated. Recently we have identified a mitogenic hydrogel system based on alginate sulfate which potently supports chondrocyte phenotype, but is not printable due to its rheological properties (no yield point). To convert alginate sulfate to a printable bioink, it was combined with nanocellulose, which has been shown to possess very good printability. The alginate sulfate/nanocellulose ink showed good printing properties and the non-printed bioink material promoted cell spreading, proliferation, and collagen II synthesis by the encapsulated cells. When the bioink was printed, the biological performance of the cells was highly dependent on the nozzle geometry. Cell spreading properties were maintained with the lowest extrusion pressure and shear stress. However, extruding the alginate sulfate/nanocellulose bioink and chondrocytes significantly compromised cell proliferation, particularly when using small diameter nozzles and valves.
AUTHOR Visscher, Dafydd O. and Bos, Ernst J. and Peeters, Mirte and Kuzmin, Nikolay V. and Groot, Marie Louise and Helder, Marco N. and van Zuijlen, Paul P. M.
Title Cartilage Tissue Engineering: Preventing Tissue Scaffold Contraction Using a 3D-Printed Polymeric Cage. [Abstract]
Year 2016
Journal/Proceedings Tissue engineering Part C: Methods
Reftype
DOI/URL DOI
Abstract
Scaffold contraction is a common but underestimated problem in the field of tissue engineering. It becomes particularly problematic when creating anatomically complex shapes such as the ear. The aim of this study was to develop a contraction-free biocompatible scaffold construct for ear cartilage tissue engineering. To address this aim, we used three constructs: (i) a fibrin/hyaluronic acid (FB/HA) hydrogel, (ii) a FB/HA hydrogel combined with a collagen I/III scaffold, and (iii) a cage construct containing (ii) surrounded by a 3D-printed poly-varepsilon-caprolactone mold. A wide range of different cell types were tested within these constructs, including chondrocytes, perichondrocytes, adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells, and their combinations. After in vitro culturing for 1, 14, and 28 days, all constructs were analyzed. Macroscopic observation showed severe contraction of the cell-seeded hydrogel (i). This could be prevented, in part, by combining the hydrogel with the collagen scaffold (ii) and prevented in total using the 3D-printed cage construct (iii). (Immuno)histological analysis, multiphoton laser scanning microscopy, and biomechanical analysis showed extracellular matrix deposition and increased Young's modulus and thereby the feasibility of ear cartilage engineering. These results demonstrated that the 3D-printed cage construct is an adequate model for contraction-free ear cartilage engineering using a range of cell combinations.
AUTHOR Ruiz-Cantu, Laura and Gleadall, Andrew and Faris, Callum and Segal, Joel and Shakesheff, Kevin and Yang, Jing
Title Characterisation of the surface structure of 3D printed scaffolds for cell infiltration and surgical suturing [Abstract]
Year 2016
Journal/Proceedings Biofabrication
Reftype
DOI/URL URL
Abstract
3D printing is of great interest for tissue engineering scaffolds due to the ability to form complex geometries and control internal structures, including porosity and pore size. The porous structure of scaffolds plays an important role in cell ingrowth and nutrition infusion. Although the internal porosity and pore size of 3D printed scaffolds have been frequently studied, the surface porosity and pore size, which are critical for cell infiltration and mass transport, have not been investigated. The surface geometry can differ considerably from the internal scaffold structure depending on the 3D printing process. It is vital to be able to control the surface geometry of scaffolds as well as the internal structure to fabricate optimal architectures. This work presents a method to control the surface porosity and pore size of 3D printed scaffolds. Six scaffold designs have been printed with surface porosities ranging from 3% to 21%. We have characterised the overall scaffold porosity and surface porosity using optical microscopy and microCT. It has been found that surface porosity has a significant impact on cell infiltration and proliferation. In addition, the porosity of the surface has been found to have an effect on mechanical properties and on the forces required to penetrate the scaffold with a surgical suturing needle. To the authors’ knowledge, this study is the first to investigate the surface geometry of extrusion-based 3D printed scaffolds and demonstrates the importance of surface geometry in cell infiltration and clinical manipulation.
AUTHOR Kesti, Matti and Fisch, Philipp and Pensalfini, Marco and Mazza, Edoardo and Zenobi-Wong, Marcy
Title Guidelines for standardization of bioprinting: a systematic study of process parameters and their effect on bioprinted structures [Abstract]
Year 2016
Journal/Proceedings BioNanoMaterials
Reftype
DOI/URL DOI
Abstract
Biofabrication techniques including three-dimensional bioprinting could be used one day to fabricate living, patient-specific tissues and organs for use in regenerative medicine. Compared to traditional casting and molding methods, bioprinted structures can be much more complex, containing for example multiple materials and cell types in controlled spatial arrangement, engineered porosity, reinforcement structures and gradients in mechanical properties. With this complexity and increased function, however, comes the necessity to develop guidelines to standardize the bioprinting process, so printed grafts can safely enter the clinics. The bioink material must firstly fulfil requirements for biocompatibility and flow. Secondly, it is important to understand how process parameters affect the final mechanical properties of the printed graft. Using a gellan-alginate physically crosslinked bioink as an example, we show shear thinning and shear recovery properties which allow good printing resolution. Printed tensile specimens were used to systematically assess effect of line spacing, printing direction and crosslinking conditions. This standardized testing allowed direct comparison between this bioink and three commercially-available products. Bioprinting is a promising, yet complex fabrication method whose outcome is sensitive to a range of process parameters. This study provides the foundation for highly needed best practice guidelines for reproducible and safe bioprinted grafts.
AUTHOR Melchels, Ferry P. W. and Blokzijl, Maarten M. and Levato, Riccardo and Peiffer, Quentin C. and de Ruijter, Myl{`{e}}ne and Hennink, Wim E. and Vermonden, Tina and Malda, Jos
Title Hydrogel-based reinforcement of 3D bioprinted constructs [Abstract]
Year 2016
Journal/Proceedings Biofabrication
Reftype
DOI/URL URL
Abstract
Progress within the field of biofabrication is hindered by a lack of suitable hydrogel formulations. Here, we present a novel approach based on a hybrid printing technique to create cellularized 3D printed constructs. The hybrid bioprinting strategy combines a reinforcing gel for mechanical support with a bioink to provide a cytocompatible environment. In comparison with thermoplastics such as IMG [http://ej.iop.org/images/1758-5090/8/3/035004/bfaa2f97ieqn1.gif] {$epsilon $} -polycaprolactone, the hydrogel-based reinforcing gel platform enables printing at cell-friendly temperatures, targets the bioprinting of softer tissues and allows for improved control over degradation kinetics. We prepared amphiphilic macromonomers based on poloxamer that form hydrolysable, covalently cross-linked polymer networks. Dissolved at a concentration of 28.6%w/w in water, it functions as reinforcing gel, while a 5%w/w gelatin-methacryloyl based gel is utilized as bioink. This strategy allows for the creation of complex structures, where the bioink provides a cytocompatible environment for encapsulated cells. Cell viability of equine chondrocytes encapsulated within printed constructs remained largely unaffected by the printing process. The versatility of the system is further demonstrated by the ability to tune the stiffness of printed constructs between 138 and 263 kPa, as well as to tailor the degradation kinetics of the reinforcing gel from several weeks up to more than a year.
AUTHOR Markstedt, Kajsa and Mantas, Athanasios and Tournier, Ivan and Mart{'{i}}nez {{'{A}}}vila, H{'{e}}ctor and H{"{a}}gg, Daniel and Gatenholm, Paul
Title 3D Bioprinting Human Chondrocytes with Nanocellulose-Alginate Bioink for Cartilage Tissue Engineering Applications [Abstract]
Year 2015
Journal/Proceedings Biomacromolecules
Reftype
DOI/URL DOI
Abstract
The introduction of 3D bioprinting is expected to revolutionize the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. The 3D bioprinter is able to dispense materials while moving in X, Y, and Z directions, which enables the engineering of complex structures from the bottom up. In this study, a bioink that combines the outstanding shear thinning properties of nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) with the fast cross-linking ability of alginate was formulated for the 3D bioprinting of living soft tissue with cells. Printability was evaluated with concern to printer parameters and shape fidelity. The shear thinning behavior of the tested bioinks enabled printing of both 2D gridlike structures as well as 3D constructs. Furthermore, anatomically shaped cartilage structures, such as a human ear and sheep meniscus, were 3D printed using MRI and CT images as blueprints. Human chondrocytes bioprinted in the noncytotoxic, nanocellulose-based bioink exhibited a cell viability of 73% and 86% after 1 and 7 days of 3D culture, respectively. On the basis of these results, we can conclude that the nanocellulose-based bioink is a suitable hydrogel for 3D bioprinting with living cells. This study demonstrates the potential use of nanocellulose for 3D bioprinting of living tissues and organs. The introduction of 3D bioprinting is expected to revolutionize the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. The 3D bioprinter is able to dispense materials while moving in X, Y, and Z directions, which enables the engineering of complex structures from the bottom up. In this study, a bioink that combines the outstanding shear thinning properties of nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) with the fast cross-linking ability of alginate was formulated for the 3D bioprinting of living soft tissue with cells. Printability was evaluated with concern to printer parameters and shape fidelity. The shear thinning behavior of the tested bioinks enabled printing of both 2D gridlike structures as well as 3D constructs. Furthermore, anatomically shaped cartilage structures, such as a human ear and sheep meniscus, were 3D printed using MRI and CT images as blueprints. Human chondrocytes bioprinted in the noncytotoxic, nanocellulose-based bioink exhibited a cell viability of 73% and 86% after 1 and 7 days of 3D culture, respectively. On the basis of these results, we can conclude that the nanocellulose-based bioink is a suitable hydrogel for 3D bioprinting with living cells. This study demonstrates the potential use of nanocellulose for 3D bioprinting of living tissues and organs.
AUTHOR Kesti, Matti and Eberhardt, Christian and Pagliccia, Guglielmo and Kenkel, David and Grande, Daniel and Boss, Andreas and Zenobi-Wong, Marcy
Title Bioprinting Complex Cartilaginous Structures with Clinically Compliant Biomaterials [Abstract]
Year 2015
Journal/Proceedings Advanced Functional Materials
Reftype
DOI/URL DOI
Abstract
Bioprinting is an emerging technology for the fabrication of patient-specific, anatomically complex tissues and organs. A novel bioink for printing cartilage grafts is developed based on two unmodified FDA-compliant polysaccharides, gellan and alginate, combined with the clinical product BioCartilage (cartilage extracellular matrix particles). Cell-friendly physical gelation of the bioink occurs in the presence of cations, which are delivered by co-extrusion of a cation-loaded transient support polymer to stabilize overhanging structures. Rheological properties of the bioink reveal optimal shear thinning and shear recovery properties for high-fidelity bioprinting. Tensile testing of the bioprinted grafts reveals a strong, ductile material. As proof of concept, 3D auricular, nasal, meniscal, and vertebral disk grafts are printed based on computer tomography data or generic 3D models. Grafts after 8 weeks in vitro are scanned using magnetic resonance imaging and histological evaluation is performed. The bioink containing BioCartilage supports proliferation of chondrocytes and, in the presence of transforming growth factor beta-3, supports strong deposition of cartilage matrix proteins. A clinically compliant bioprinting method is presented which yields patient-specific cartilage grafts with good mechanical and biological properties. The versatile method can be used with any type of tissue particles to create tissue-specific and bioactive scaffolds.
AUTHOR M{"{u}}ller, Michael and Becher, Jana and Schnabelrauch, Matthias and Zenobi-Wong, Marcy
Title Nanostructured Pluronic hydrogels as bioinks for 3D bioprinting [Abstract]
Year 2015
Journal/Proceedings Biofabrication
Reftype
DOI/URL URL
Abstract
Bioprinting is an emerging technology in the field of tissue engineering as it allows the precise positioning of biologically relevant materials in 3D, which more resembles the native tissue in our body than current homogenous, bulk approaches. There is however a lack of materials to be used with this technology and materials such as the block copolymer Pluronic have good printing properties but do not allow long-term cell culture. Here we present an approach called nanostructuring to increase the biocompatibility of Pluronic gels at printable concentrations. By mixing acrylated with unmodified Pluronic F127 it was possible to maintain the excellent printing properties of Pluronic and to create stable gels via UV crosslinking. By subsequent elution of the unmodified Pluronic from the crosslinked network we were able to increase the cell viability of encapsulated chondrocytes at day 14 from 62% for a pure acrylated Pluronic hydrogel to 86% for a nanostructured hydrogel. The mixed Pluronic gels also showed good printability when cells where included in the bioink. The nanostructured gels were, with a compressive modulus of 1.42 kPa, mechanically weak, but we were able to increase the mechanical properties by the addition of methacrylated hyaluronic acid. Our nanostructuring approach enables Pluronic hydrogels to have the desired set of properties in all stages of the bioprinting process.
AUTHOR Kesti, Matti and M{"{u}}ller, Michael and Becher, Jana and Schnabelrauch, Matthias and D{textquoteright}Este, Matteo and Eglin, David and Zenobi-Wong, Marcy
Title A versatile bioink for three-dimensional printing of cellular scaffolds based on thermally and photo-triggered tandem gelation [Abstract]
Year 2014
Journal/Proceedings Acta Biomaterialia
Reftype
DOI/URL URL DOI
Abstract
Abstract Layer-by-layer bioprinting is a logical choice for the fabrication of stratified tissues like articular cartilage. Printing of viable organ replacements, however, is dependent on bioinks with appropriate rheological and cytocompatible properties. In cartilage engineering, photocrosslinkable glycosaminoglycan-based hydrogels are chondrogenic, but alone have generally poor printing properties. By blending the thermoresponsive polymer poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) grafted hyaluronan (HA-pNIPAAM) with methacrylated hyaluronan (HAMA), high-resolution scaffolds with good viability were printed. HA-pNIPAAM provided fast gelation and immediate post-printing structural fidelity, while {HAMA} ensured long-term mechanical stability upon photocrosslinking. The bioink was evaluated for rheological properties, swelling behavior, printability and biocompatibility of encapsulated bovine chondrocytes. Elution of HA-pNIPAAM from the scaffold was necessary to obtain good viability. HA-pNIPAAM can therefore be used to support extrusion of a range of biopolymers which undergo tandem gelation, thereby facilitating the printing of cell-laden, stratified cartilage constructs with zonally varying composition and stiffness.