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You are researching: Poly Lactic-co-Glycolic Acid (PLGA)
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AUTHOR Zamani, Yasaman and Amoabediny, Ghassem and Mohammadi, Javad and Zandieh-Doulabi, Behrouz and Klein-Nulend, Jenneke and Helder, Marco N.
Title Increased Osteogenic Potential of Pre-Osteoblasts on Three-Dimensional Printed Scaffolds Compared to Porous Scaffolds for Bone Regeneration [Abstract]
Year 2021
Journal/Proceedings Iranian Biomedical Journal
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Abstract
Background: One of the main challenges with conventional scaffold fabrication methods is the inability to control scaffold architecture. Recently, scaffolds with controlled shape and architecture have been fabricated using three-dimensional printing (3DP). Herein, we aimed to determine whether the much tighter control of microstructure of 3DP poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid/β-tricalcium phosphate (PLGA/β-TCP) scaffolds is more effective in promoting osteogenesis than porous scaffolds produced by solvent casting/porogen leaching. Methods: Physical and mechanical properties of porous and 3DP scaffolds were studied. The response of pre-osteoblasts to the scaffolds was analyzed after 14 days. Results: The 3DP scaffolds had a smoother surface (Ra: 22 ± 3 µm) relative to the highly rough surface of porous scaffolds (Ra: 110 ± 15 µm). Water contact angle was 112 ± 4° on porous and 76 ± 6° on 3DP scaffolds. Porous and 3DP scaffolds had the pore size of 408 ± 90 and 315 ± 17 µm and porosity of 85 ± 5% and 39 ± 7%, respectively. Compressive strength of 3DP scaffolds (4.0 ± 0.3 MPa) was higher than porous scaffolds (1.7 ± 0.2 MPa). Collagenous matrix deposition was similar on both scaffolds. Cells proliferated from day 1 to day 14 by fourfold in porous and by 3.8-fold in 3DP scaffolds. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity was 21-fold higher in 3DP scaffolds than porous scaffolds. Conclusion: The 3DP scaffolds show enhanced mechanical properties and ALP activity compared to porous scaffolds in vitro, suggesting that 3DP PLGA/β-TCP scaffolds are possibly more favorable for bone formation.
AUTHOR Critchley, Susan and Sheehy, Eamon J. and Cunniffe, Gráinne and Diaz-Payno, Pedro and Carroll, Simon F. and Jeon, Oju and Alsberg, Eben and Brama, Pieter A. J. and Kelly, Daniel J.
Title 3D printing of fibre-reinforced cartilaginous templates for the regeneration of osteochondral defects [Abstract]
Year 2020
Journal/Proceedings Acta Biomaterialia
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Successful osteochondral defect repair requires regenerating the subchondral bone whilst simultaneously promoting the development of an overlying layer of articular cartilage that is resistant to vascularization and endochondral ossification. During skeletal development articular cartilage also functions as a surface growth plate, which postnatally is replaced by a more spatially complex bone-cartilage interface. Motivated by this developmental process, the hypothesis of this study is that bi-phasic, fibre-reinforced cartilaginous templates can regenerate both the articular cartilage and subchondral bone within osteochondral defects created in caprine joints. To engineer mechanically competent implants, we first compared a range of 3D printed fibre networks (PCL, PLA and PLGA) for their capacity to mechanically reinforce alginate hydrogels whilst simultaneously supporting mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) chondrogenesis in vitro. These mechanically reinforced, MSC-laden alginate hydrogels were then used to engineer the endochondral bone forming phase of bi-phasic osteochondral constructs, with the overlying chondral phase consisting of cartilage tissue engineered using a co-culture of infrapatellar fat pad derived stem/stromal cells (FPSCs) and chondrocytes. Following chondrogenic priming and subcutaneous implantation in nude mice, these bi-phasic cartilaginous constructs were found to support the development of vascularised endochondral bone overlaid by phenotypically stable cartilage. These fibre-reinforced, bi-phasic cartilaginous templates were then evaluated in clinically relevant, large animal (caprine) model of osteochondral defect repair. Although the quality of repair was variable from animal-to-animal, in general more hyaline-like cartilage repair was observed after 6 months in animals treated with bi-phasic constructs compared to animals treated with commercial control scaffolds. This variability in the quality of repair points to the need for further improvements in the design of 3D bioprinted implants for joint regeneration. Statement of Significance Successful osteochondral defect repair requires regenerating the subchondral bone whilst simultaneously promoting the development of an overlying layer of articular cartilage. In this study, we hypothesised that bi-phasic, fibre-reinforced cartilaginous templates could be leveraged to regenerate both the articular cartilage and subchondral bone within osteochondral defects. To this end we used 3D printed fibre networks to mechanically reinforce engineered transient cartilage, which also contained an overlying layer of phenotypically stable cartilage engineered using a co-culture of chondrocytes and stem cells. When chondrogenically primed and implanted into caprine osteochondral defects, these fibre-reinforced bi-phasic cartilaginous grafts were shown to spatially direct tissue development during joint repair. Such developmentally inspired tissue engineering strategies, enabled by advances in biofabrication and 3D printing, could form the basis of new classes of regenerative implants in orthopaedic medicine.
AUTHOR Zamani, Yasaman and Mohammadi, Javad and Amoabediny, Ghassem and Helder, Marco N. and Zandieh-Doulabi, Behrouz and Klein-Nulend, Jenneke
Title Bioprinting of Alginate-Encapsulated Pre-osteoblasts in PLGA/β-TCP Scaffolds Enhances Cell Retention but Impairs Osteogenic Differentiation Compared to Cell Seeding after 3D-Printing [Abstract]
Year 2020
Journal/Proceedings Regenerative Engineering and Translational Medicine
Reftype Zamani2020
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In tissue engineering, cellularization of scaffolds has typically been performed by seeding the cells after scaffold fabrication. 3D-printing technology now allows bioprinting of cells encapsulated in a hydrogel simultaneously with the scaffold material. Here, we aimed to investigate whether bioprinting or cell seeding post-printing is more effective in enhancing responses of pre-osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cell line derived from mouse calvaria.
AUTHOR Abu Awwad, Hosam Al-Deen M. and Thiagarajan, Lalitha and Kanczler, Janos M. and Amer, Mahetab H. and Bruce, Gordon and Lanham, Stuart and Rumney, Robin M. H. and Oreffo, Richard O. C. and Dixon, James E.
Title Genetically-programmed, mesenchymal stromal cell-laden & mechanically strong 3D bioprinted scaffolds for bone repair [Abstract]
Year 2020
Journal/Proceedings Journal of Controlled Release
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Additive manufacturing processes used to create regenerative bone tissue engineered implants are not biocompatible, thereby restricting direct use with stem cells and usually require cell seeding post-fabrication. Combined delivery of stem cells with the controlled release of osteogenic factors, within a mechanically-strong biomaterial combined during manufacturing would replace injectable defect fillers (cements) and allow personalized implants to be rapidly prototyped by 3D bioprinting. Through the use of direct genetic programming via the sustained release of an exogenously delivered transcription factor RUNX2 (delivered as recombinant GET-RUNX2 protein) encapsulated in PLGA microparticles (MPs), we demonstrate that human mesenchymal stromal (stem) cells (hMSCs) can be directly fabricated into a thermo-sintered 3D bioprintable material and achieve effective osteogenic differentiation. Importantly we observed osteogenic programming of gene expression by released GET-RUNX2 (8.2-, 3.3- and 3.9-fold increases in OSX, RUNX2 and OPN expression, respectively) and calcification (von Kossa staining) in our scaffolds. The developed biodegradable PLGA/PEG paste formulation augments high-density bone development in a defect model (~2.4-fold increase in high density bone volume) and can be used to rapidly prototype clinically-sized hMSC-laden implants within minutes using mild, cytocompatible extrusion bioprinting. The ability to create mechanically strong 'cancellous bone-like’ printable implants for tissue repair that contain stem cells and controlled-release of programming factors is innovative, and will facilitate the development of novel localized delivery approaches to direct cellular behaviour for many regenerative medicine applications including those for personalized bone repair.
AUTHOR Aied, Ahmed and Song, Wenhui and Wang, Wenxin and Baki, Abdulrahman and Sigen, A.
Title 3D Bioprinting of stimuli-responsive polymers synthesised from DE-ATRP into soft tissue replicas [Abstract]
Year 2018
Journal/Proceedings Bioprinting
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Synthetic polymers possess more reproducible physical and chemical properties than their naturally occurring counterparts. They have also emerged as an important alternative for fabricating tissue substitutes because they can be molecularly tailored to have vast array of molecular weights, block structures, active functional groups, and mechanical properties. To this date however, there has been very few successful and fully functional synthetic tissue and organ substitutes and with the rapidly spreading 3D printing technology beginning to reshape the tissue engineering and regenerative field, the need for an effective, safe, and bio printable biomaterial is becoming more and more urgent. Here, we have developed a synthetic polymer from controlled living radical polymerisation that can be printed into well-defined structures. The polymer showed low cytotoxicity before and after printing. Additionally, the incorporation of gelatine-methacrylate coated PLGA microparticles within the hydrogel provided cell adhesion surfaces for cell proliferation. The results point to possible application of the microparticle seeded, synthetic hydrogel as a direct printable tissue or organ substitute.
AUTHOR Liao, Zhiyu and Sinjab, Faris and Nommeots-Nomm, Amy and Jones, Julian and Ruiz-Cantu, Laura and Yang, Jing and Rose, Felicity and Notingher, Ioan
Title Feasibility of Spatially Offset Raman Spectroscopy for in Vitro and in Vivo Monitoring Mineralization of Bone Tissue Engineering Scaffolds [Abstract]
Year 2017
Journal/Proceedings Analytical Chemistry
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We investigated the feasibility of using spatially offset Raman spectroscopy (SORS) for nondestructive characterization of bone tissue engineering scaffolds. The deep regions of these scaffolds, or scaffolds implanted subcutaneously in live animals, are typically difficult to measure by confocal Raman spectroscopy techniques because of the limited depth penetration of light caused by the high level of light scattering. Layered samples consisting of bioactive glass foams (IEIC16), three-dimensional (3D)-printed biodegradable poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) scaffolds (PLGA), and hydroxyapatite powder (HA) were used to mimic nondestructive detection of biomineralization for intact real-size 3D tissue engineering constructs. SORS spectra were measured with a new SORS instrument using a digital micromirror device (DMD) to allow software selection of the spatial offsets. The results show that HA can be reliably detected at depths of 0–2.3 mm, which corresponds to the maximum accessible spatial offset of the current instrument. The intensity ratio of Raman bands associated with the scaffolds and HA with the spatial offset depended on the depth at which HA was located. Furthermore, we show the feasibility for in vivo monitoring mineralization of scaffold implanted subcutaneously by demonstrating the ability to measure transcutaneously Raman signals of the scaffolds and HA (fresh chicken skin used as a top layer). The ability to measure spectral depth profiles at high speed (5 s acquisition time) and the ease of implementation make SORS a promising approach for noninvasive characterization of cell/tissue development in vitro, and for long-term in vivo monitoring the mineralization in 3D scaffolds subcutaneously implanted in small animals.