REGENHU-Switzerland-3d-bioprinting-instrument-bio-3d-bioprinter-DevelopmentTeam-0006

SCIENTIFIC PUBLICATIONS

You are researching: Spheroids
Matching entries: 9 /9
All Groups
AUTHOR Nothdurfter, Daniel and Ploner, Christian and Coraça-Huber, Débora C. and Wilflingseder, Doris and Müller, Thomas and Hermann, Martin and Hagenbuchner, Judith and Ausserlechner, Michael J.
Title 3D bioprinted, vascularized neuroblastoma tumor environment in fluidic chip devices for precision medicine drug testing [Abstract]
Year 2022
Journal/Proceedings Biofabrication
Reftype
DOI/URL DOI
Abstract
Neuroblastoma is an extracranial solid tumor which develops in early childhood and still has a poor prognosis. One strategy to increase cure rates is the identification of patient-specific drug responses in tissue models that mimic the interaction between patient cancer cells and tumor environment. We therefore developed a perfused and micro-vascularized tumor-environment model that is directly bioprinted into custom-manufactured fluidic chips. A gelatin-methacrylate/fibrin-based matrix containing multiple cell types mimics the tumor-microenvironment that promotes spontaneous micro-vessel formation by embedded endothelial cells. We demonstrate that both, adipocyte- and iPSC-derived mesenchymal stem cells can guide this process. Bioprinted channels are coated with endothelial cells post printing to form a dense vessel - tissue barrier. The tissue model thereby mimics structure and function of human soft tissue with endothelial cell-coated larger vessels for perfusion and micro-vessel networks within the hydrogel-matrix. Patient-derived neuroblastoma spheroids are added to the matrix during the printing process and grown for more than two weeks. We demonstrate that micro-vessels are attracted by and grow into tumor spheroids and that neuroblastoma cells invade the tumor-environment as soon as the spheroids disrupt. In summary, we describe the first bioprinted, micro-vascularized neuroblastoma – tumor-environment model directly printed into fluidic chips and a novel medium-throughput biofabrication platform suitable for studying tumor angiogenesis and metastasis in precision medicine approaches in future.
AUTHOR Dufour, A. and Gallostra, X. Barceló and O'Keeffe, C. and Eichholz, K. and Von Euw, S. and Garcia, O. and Kelly, D. J.
Title Integrating melt electrowriting and inkjet bioprinting for engineering structurally organized articular cartilage [Abstract]
Year 2022
Journal/Proceedings Biomaterials
Reftype
DOI/URL URL DOI
Abstract
Successful cartilage engineering requires the generation of biological grafts mimicking the structure, composition and mechanical behaviour of the native tissue. Here melt electrowriting (MEW) was used to produce arrays of polymeric structures whose function was to orient the growth of cellular aggregates spontaneously generated within these structures, and to provide tensile reinforcement to the resulting tissues. Inkjet printing was used to deposit defined numbers of cells into MEW structures, which self-assembled into an organized array of spheroids within hours, ultimately generating a hybrid tissue that was hyaline-like in composition. Structurally, the engineered cartilage mimicked the histotypical organization observed in skeletally immature synovial joints. This biofabrication framework was then used to generate scaled-up (50 mm × 50 mm) cartilage implants containing over 3,500 cellular aggregates in under 15 min. After 8 weeks in culture, a 50-fold increase in the compressive stiffness of these MEW reinforced tissues were observed, while the tensile properties were still dominated by the polymer network, resulting in a composite construct demonstrating tension-compression nonlinearity mimetic of the native tissue. Helium ion microscopy further demonstrated the development of an arcading collagen network within the engineered tissue. This hybrid bioprinting strategy provides a versatile and scalable approach to engineer cartilage biomimetic grafts for biological joint resurfacing.
AUTHOR Benmeridja, Lara and De Moor, Lise and De Maere, Elisabeth and Vanlauwe, Florian and Ryx, Michelle and Tytgat, Liesbeth and Vercruysse, Chris and Dubruel, Peter and Van Vlierberghe, Sandra and Blondeel, Phillip and Declercq, Heidi
Title High-throughput fabrication of vascularized adipose microtissues for 3D bioprinting [Abstract]
Year 2020
Journal/Proceedings Journal of Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine
Reftype
DOI/URL DOI
Abstract
Abstract For patients with soft tissue defects, repair with autologous in vitro engineered adipose tissue could be a promising alternative to current surgical therapies. A volume-persistent engineered adipose tissue construct under in vivo conditions can only be achieved by early vascularization after transplantation. The combination of 3D bioprinting technology with self-assembling microvascularized units as building blocks can potentially answer the need for a microvascular network. In the present study, co-culture spheroids combining adipose-derived stem cells (ASC) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were created with an ideal geometry for bioprinting. When applying the favourable seeding technique and condition, compact viable spheroids were obtained, demonstrating high adipogenic differentiation and capillary-like network formation after 7 and 14 days of culture, as shown by live/dead analysis, immunohistochemistry and RT-qPCR. Moreover, we were able to successfully 3D bioprint the encapsulated spheroids, resulting in compact viable spheroids presenting capillary-like structures, lipid droplets and spheroid outgrowth after 14 days of culture. This is the first study that generates viable high-throughput (pre-)vascularized adipose microtissues as building blocks for bioprinting applications using a novel ASC/HUVEC co-culture spheroid model, which enables both adipogenic differentiation while simultaneously supporting the formation of prevascular-like structures within engineered tissues in vitro.
AUTHOR Daly, Andrew C. and Kelly, Daniel J.
Title Biofabrication of spatially organised tissues by directing the growth of cellular spheroids within 3D printed polymeric microchambers [Abstract]
Year 2019
Journal/Proceedings Biomaterials
Reftype
DOI/URL URL DOI
Abstract
Successful tissue engineering requires the generation of human scale implants that mimic the structure, composition and mechanical properties of native tissues. Here, we report a novel biofabrication strategy that enables the engineering of structurally organised tissues by guiding the growth of cellular spheroids within arrays of 3D printed polymeric microchambers. With the goal of engineering stratified articular cartilage, inkjet bioprinting was used to deposit defined numbers of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) and chondrocytes into pre-printed microchambers. These jetted cell suspensions rapidly underwent condensation within the hydrophobic microchambers, leading to the formation of organised arrays of cellular spheroids. The microchambers were also designed to provide boundary conditions to these spheroids, guiding their growth and eventual fusion, leading to the development of stratified cartilage tissue with a depth-dependant collagen fiber architecture that mimicked the structure of native articular cartilage. Furthermore, the composition and biomechanical properties of the bioprinted cartilage was also comparable to the native tissue. Using multi-tool biofabrication, we were also able to engineer anatomically accurate, human scale, osteochondral templates by printing this microchamber system on top of a hypertrophic cartilage region designed to support endochondral bone formation and then maintaining the entire construct in long-term bioreactor culture to enhance tissue development. This bioprinting strategy provides a versatile and scalable approach to engineer structurally organised cartilage tissues for joint resurfacing applications.
AUTHOR Colle, Julien and Blondeel, Phillip and De Bruyne, Axelle and Bochar, Silke and Tytgat, Liesbeth and Vercruysse, Chris and Van Vlierberghe, Sandra and Dubruel, Peter and Declercq, Heidi
Title Bioprinting predifferentiated adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cell spheroids with methacrylated gelatin ink for adipose tissue engineering [Abstract]
Year 2020
Journal/Proceedings Journal of Materials Science: Materials in Medicine
Reftype Colle2020
DOI/URL DOI
Abstract
The increasing number of mastectomies results in a greater demand for breast reconstruction characterized by simplicity and a low complication profile. Reconstructive surgeons are investigating tissue engineering (TE) strategies to overcome the current surgical drawbacks. 3D bioprinting is the rising technique for the fabrication of large tissue constructs which provides a potential solution for unmet clinical needs in breast reconstruction building on decades of experience in autologous fat grafting, adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cell (ASC) biology and TE. A scaffold was bioprinted using encapsulated ASC spheroids in methacrylated gelatin ink (GelMA). Uniform ASC spheroids with an ideal geometry and diameter for bioprinting were formed, using a high-throughput non-adhesive agarose microwell system. ASC spheroids in adipogenic differentiation medium (ADM) were evaluated through live/dead staining, histology (HE, Oil Red O), TEM and RT-qPCR. Viable spheroids were obtained for up to 14 days post-printing and showed multilocular microvacuoles and successful differentiation toward mature adipocytes shown by gene expression analysis. Moreover, spheroids were able to assemble at random in GelMA, creating a macrotissue. Combining the advantage of microtissues to self-assemble and the controlled organization by bioprinting technologies, these ASC spheroids can be useful as building blocks for the engineering of soft tissue implants.
AUTHOR Staubli, Flurina and Stoddart, Martin J. and D'Este, Matteo and Schwab, Andrea
Title Pre-culture of human mesenchymal stromal cells in spheroids facilitates chondrogenesis at a low total cell count upon embedding in biomaterials to generate cartilage microtissues [Abstract]
Year 2022
Journal/Proceedings Acta Biomaterialia
Reftype
DOI/URL URL DOI
Abstract
Material-assisted cartilage tissue engineering has limited application in cartilage treatment due to hypertrophic tissue formation and high cell counts required. This study aimed at investigating the potential of human mesenchymal stromal cell (hMSC) spheroids embedded in biomaterials to study the effect of biomaterial composition on cell differentiation. Pre-cultured (3 days, chondrogenic differentiation media) spheroids (250 cells/spheroid) were embedded in tyramine-modified hyaluronic acid (THA) and collagen type I (Col) composite hydrogels (four combinations of THA (12.5 vs 16.7 mg/ml) and Col (2.5 vs 1.7 mg/ml) content) at a cell density of 5 × 106 cells/ml (2 × 104 spheroids/ml). Macropellets derived from single hMSCs (2.5 × 105 cells, ScMP) or hMSC spheroids (2.5 × 105 cells, 103 spheroids, SpMP) served as control. hMSC differentiation was analyzed using glycosaminoglycan (GAG) quantification, gene expression analysis and (immuno-)histology. Embedding of hMSC spheroids in THA-Col induced chondrogenic differentiation marked by upregulation of aggrecan (ACAN) and COL2A1, and the production of GAGs . Lower THA led to more pronounced chondrogenic phenotype compared to higher THA content. Col content had no significant influence on hMSC chondrogenesis. Pellet cultures showed an upregulation in chondrogenic-associated genes and production of GAGs with less upregulation of hypertrophic-associated genes in SpMP culture compared to ScMP group. This study presents hMSC pre-culture in spheroids as promising approach to study chondrogenic differentiation after biomaterial encapsulation at low total cell count (5 × 106/ml) without compromising chondrogenic matrix production. This approach can be applied to assemble microtissues in biomaterials to generate large cartilage construct. Statement of significance In vitro studies investigating the chondrogenic potential of biomaterials are limited due to the low cell-cell contact of encapsulated single cells. Here, we introduce the use of pre-cultured hMSC spheroids to study chondrogenesis upon encapsulation in a biomaterial. The use of spheroids takes advantage of the high cell-cell contact within each spheroid being critical in the early chondrogenesis of hMSCs. At a low seeding density of 5·106 cells/ml (2 × 104 spheroids/ml) we demonstrated hMSC chondrogenesis and cartilaginous matrix deposition. Our results indicate that the pre-culture might have a beneficial effect on hypertrophic gene expression without compromising chondrogenic differentiation. This approach has shown potential to assemble microtissues (here spheroids) in biomaterials to generate large cartilage constructs and to study the effect of biomaterial composition on cell alignment and migration.
AUTHOR Paindelli, Claudia and Casarin, Stefano and Wang, Feng and Diaz-Gomez, Luis and Zhang, Jianhua and Mikos, Antonios G. and Logothetis, Christopher J. and Friedl, Peter and Dondossola, Eleonora
Title Enhancing Radium 223 treatment efficacy by anti-beta 1 integrin targeting [Abstract]
Year 2021
Journal/Proceedings Journal of Nuclear Medicine
Reftype
DOI/URL URL DOI
Abstract
Radium 223 (223Ra) is an α-emitter approved for the treatment of bone metastatic prostate cancer (PCa), which exerts direct cytotoxicity towards PCa cells near the bone interface, whereas cells positioned in the core respond poorly, due to short α-particle penetrance. β1 integrin (β1I) interference has been shown to increase radiosensitivity and significantly enhance external beam radiation efficiency. We hypothesized that targeting β1I would improve 223Ra outcome. We tested the effect of combining 223Ra and anti-β1I antibody treatment in PC3 and C4-2B PCa cell models expressing high and low β1I levels, respectively. In vivo tumor growth was evaluated through bioluminescence. Cellular and molecular determinants of response were analyzed by ex vivo three-dimensional imaging of bone lesions, proteomic analysis and further confirmed by computational modeling and in vitro functional analysis in tissue-engineered bone mimetic systems. Interference with β1I combined with 223Ra reduced PC3 cell growth in bone and significantly improved overall mouse survival, while no change was achieved in C4-2B tumors. Anti-β1I treatment decreased PC3 tumor cell mitosis index and spatially expanded 223Ra lethal effects two-fold, in vivo and in silico. Regression was paralleled by decreased expression of radio-resistance mediators. Targeting β1I significantly improves 223Ra outcome and points towards combinatorial application in PCa tumors with high β1I expression.
AUTHOR De Moor, Lise and Minne, Mendy and Tytgat, Liesbeth and Vercruysse, Chris and Dubruel, Peter and Van Vlierberghe, Sandra and Declercq, Heidi
Title Tuning the Phenotype of Cartilage Tissue Mimics by Varying Spheroid Maturation and Methacrylamide-Modified Gelatin Hydrogel Characteristics [Abstract]
Year 2021
Journal/Proceedings Macromolecular Bioscience
Reftype
DOI/URL DOI
Abstract
Abstract In hybrid bioprinting of cartilage tissue constructs, spheroids are used as cellular building blocks and combined with biomaterials for dispensing. However, biomaterial intrinsic cues can deeply affect cell fate and to date, the influence of hydrogel encapsulation on spheroid viability and phenotype has received limited attention. This study assesses this need and unravels 1) how the phenotype of spheroid-laden constructs can be tuned through adjusting the hydrogel physico–chemical properties and 2) if the spheroid maturation stage prior to encapsulation is a determining factor for the construct phenotype. Articular chondrocyte spheroids with a cartilage specific extracellular matrix (ECM) are generated and different maturation stages, early-, mid-, and late-stage (3, 7, and 14 days, respectively), are harvested and encapsulated in 10, 15, or 20 w/v% methacrylamide-modified gelatin (gelMA) for 14 days. The encapsulation of immature spheroids do not lead to a cartilage-like ECM production but when more mature mid- or late-stage spheroids are combined with a certain concentration of gelMA, a fibrocartilage-like as well as a hyaline cartilage-like phenotype can be induced. As a proof of concept, late-stage spheroids are bioprinted using a 10 w/v% gelMA–Irgacure 2959 solution with the aim to test the processing potential of the spheroid-laden bioink.
AUTHOR De Moor, Lise and Fernandez, Sélina and Vercruysse, Chris and Tytgat, Liesbeth and Asadian, Mahtab and De Geyter, Nathalie and Van Vlierberghe, Sandra and Dubruel, Peter and Declercq, Heidi
Title Hybrid Bioprinting of Chondrogenically Induced Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell Spheroids [Abstract]
Year 2020
Journal/Proceedings Frontiers in Bioengineering and Biotechnology
Reftype
DOI/URL DOI
Abstract
To date, the treatment of articular cartilage lesions remains challenging. A promising strategy for the development of new regenerative therapies is hybrid bioprinting, combining the principles of developmental biology, biomaterial science, and 3D bioprinting. In this approach, scaffold-free cartilage microtissues with small diameters are used as building blocks, combined with a photo-crosslinkable hydrogel and subsequently bioprinted. Spheroids of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBM-MSC) are created using a high-throughput microwell system and chondrogenic differentiation is induced during 42 days by applying chondrogenic culture medium and low oxygen tension (5%). Stable and homogeneous cartilage spheroids with a mean diameter of 116 ± 2.80 μm, which is compatible with bioprinting, were created after 14 days of culture and a glycosaminoglycans (GAG)- and collagen II-positive extracellular matrix (ECM) was observed. Spheroids were able to assemble at random into a macrotissue, driven by developmental biology tissue fusion processes, and after 72 h of culture, a compact macrotissue was formed. In a directed assembly approach, spheroids were assembled with high spatial control using the bio-ink based extrusion bioprinting approach. Therefore, 14-day spheroids were combined with a photo-crosslinkable methacrylamide-modified gelatin (gelMA) as viscous printing medium to ensure shape fidelity of the printed construct. The photo-initiators Irgacure 2959 and Li-TPO-L were evaluated by assessing their effect on bio-ink properties and the chondrogenic phenotype. The encapsulation in gelMA resulted in further chondrogenic maturation observed by an increased production of GAG and a reduction of collagen I. Moreover, the use of Li-TPO-L lead to constructs with lower stiffness which induced a decrease of collagen I and an increase in GAG and collagen II production. After 3D bioprinting, spheroids remained viable and the cartilage phenotype was maintained. Our findings demonstrate that hBM-MSC spheroids are able to differentiate into cartilage microtissues and display a geometry compatible with 3D bioprinting. Furthermore, for hybrid bioprinting of these spheroids, gelMA is a promising material as it exhibits favorable properties in terms of printability and it supports the viability and chondrogenic phenotype of hBM-MSC microtissues. Moreover, it was shown that a lower hydrogel stiffness enhances further chondrogenic maturation after bioprinting.